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26.10.2011., srijeda

ASIAN GIRL BABY OIL. ASIAN GIRL


Asian Girl Baby Oil. Will The Real Sugar Baby Please Jump Up.



Asian Girl Baby Oil





asian girl baby oil






    baby oil
  • A mineral oil used to soften the skin

  • A mineral oil or liquid petroleum is a liquid by-product of the distillation of petroleum to produce gasoline and other petroleum based products from crude oil.

  • an ointment for babies

  • Mineral oil with added perfume. See Mineral oil





    asian
  • A native of Asia or a person of Asian descent

  • (asia) the largest continent with 60% of the earth's population; it is joined to Europe on the west to form Eurasia; it is the site of some of the world's earliest civilizations

  • a native or inhabitant of Asia

  • of or relating to or characteristic of Asia or the peoples of Asia or their languages or culture; "Asian countries"





    girl
  • A young or relatively young woman

  • daughter: a female human offspring; "her daughter cared for her in her old age"

  • female child: a youthful female person; "the baby was a girl"; "the girls were just learning to ride a tricycle"

  • A female child

  • A person's daughter, esp. a young one

  • a young woman; "a young lady of 18"











asian girl baby oil - Johnson's Baby




Johnson's Baby Oil with Aloe Vera & Vitamin E, 14 oz


Johnson's Baby Oil with Aloe Vera & Vitamin E, 14 oz



Mildness clinically proven. The way your skin looks and feels depends in part on how much moisture it contains. Discover an effective way to help protect your skin from dryness and the itching, flaking and ashiness that come with it. Johnson's Baby Oil with Aloe Vera & Vitamin E helps seal in vital moisture to keep your skin feeling soft, smooth and silky all day long. Pure aloe vera is an herbal extract long known for soothing your skin. Vitamin E is a natural skin conditioner. Johnson's baby oil with aloe vera & vitamin E is an effective way to moisturize and nourish your skin. Johnson's is dermatologist and allergy tested. Made in USA.










87% (19)





Chinese Rice dumpling prepared by mum 8 Jun 08




Chinese Rice dumpling prepared by mum  8 Jun 08





These are some of the Chinese Rice dumpling prepared by Mum 8 Jun 08. Had two for breakfast this morning. I learnt how to wrap it when I was young thgh my skill isn't as good as hers. Used to make a lot of different kinds of rice dumpling when we lived in a Kampong-like estate where folks cooked food using charcoal stoves in the common backyard. About 20 households shared a common backyard where we cooked using charcoal stoves. The children bathed there with water from the gigantic ceramic pitcher and neighbours kept all kinds of pets (chickens, dogs, cats etc) that roamed the whole backyard (That's where I got my phobia towards cats). Since moving from that place to a flat when I was 13, Mum still prepared a lot of traditional Chinese food thgh long gone were the Kampong spirit ('Kampong' means 'village' in the Malay language) and associated festive mood. She did it illegally though at first, using gigantic oil tin to cook the dumpling along the corridor. This year, she prepared just a a handful using the gas stove. I have to say that she is a fantastic cook since she had been cooking and selling lots of traditional Chinese food to sell at streets when she was young. Didn't have much education cos people were mostly too poor to spend too many years in school, especially for girls. As she grew older each year, she cooked less and less and the taste kind of changed. I guess as people grow older, their preferences and cooking change as well. I have to say I'm not that enthusiastic about the traditional food now compared to the time when I was young. Maybe I no longer got to help prepare it personally or we just had too much good food now to appreciate things as we used to. I used to salivate over a bottle of coke, sipped hungrily from a small cup of chocolate milk (about once a month) or gobbled a bowl of instant noodles with egg hungrily that Mum prepared for the four of us in a big pot. Even toasted bread with butter and Kaya jam was a rare treat that made me not want to go home cos I got to eat it at breakfast at my relative's house during the few days I was there. Really missed the good old days of my childhood. :P

See the other pics for more rice dumplings and other Asian food at under Food Glorious Food set at my flickr.

About 2-3 months ago, I started having thoughts of making felt rice dumplings but still haven't got an uninterrupted time to experiment with the patterns. It'll be probably quite hard to find an 'adopter' for it so if I make it, I will probably keep it or give it as a gift eventually. Initially, I had lots of craze ideas for my felt stuffs too but realised that while people may find unusual designs cute, it may be easier to find people who're willing to pay n 'adopt' it. I also had crazy ideas about making felt toilet row on hanger in a series of work involving a conversation of a mother with her son, the way they did for comic strips (just that my pics are represented by handmade felt crafts instead). Well, for the same reasons, I will KIV that plan. Already, it was hard to find 'adopters' for my felt donuts & coasters thgh many flickrers and frens complimented them. See how.^^

While I am really a terrible cook, I am quite a foodie, being 'pampered' in the area of food. Esp so since i spent my childhood in a kampong-like estate where there were lots of old folks who spent their free time cooking lots of traditional food to sell, such as Indian Rojak, fried onion kuey, all kinds of kuey kuey, mee hoon, Loh Mai Fun, Fried Kuey Tiao etc. I only got to taste the 'commericalised' version of many traditional food at hawker centre when we moved out of that place by the end of Primary 6. I have to say that most of those that I have tried at hawker centres 'can't fight' with those that i have tried when i was young. Old folks carried food in wooden containers and a portable charcoal stove balanced on a wooden pole on their shoulder. Since these old folks were doing it to kill time or earn extra pocket money in our neighbourhood then, the prices were really cheap. I remembered an old uncle coming around 8pm in the evening once a week selling barbecued pork puff (a bit like Old Chang Kee curry puffs, just that the filling is barbecued pork, like those in Char Siew buns). Just 50cents for a piping hot one n we could just walk out to him from your door. Even my classmate went around selling mee hoon in an old baby pram. There was even an old uncle who went around door to door giving haircut at $3. Just put a stool at your front door and he will cut it for you on the spot.

Folks chilled out at the common front yard in the evening, chatting with one another under the stars. I used to have 'candlelight dinner' at the stone table outside my house whenever there was a blackout. Lot of fun for kids whenever there was a blackout. I got to bathe or read my textbook under the candle light too. Suddenly, the mood to bathe or read my book was there whenever the blackout came and the candles were used.











Chinese Rice dumpling prepared by mum 8 Jun 08




Chinese Rice dumpling prepared by mum  8 Jun 08





These are some of the Chinese Rice dumpling prepared by Mum 8 Jun 08. Had two for breakfast this morning. I learnt how to wrap it when I was young thgh my skill isn't as good as hers. Used to make a lot of different kinds of rice dumpling when we lived in a Kampong-like estate where folks cooked food using charcoal stoves in the common backyard. About 20 households shared a common backyard where we cooked using charcoal stoves. The children bathed there with water from the gigantic ceramic pitcher and neighbours kept all kinds of pets (chickens, dogs, cats etc) that roamed the whole backyard (That's where I got my phobia towards cats).

Since moving from that place to a flat when I was 13, Mum still prepare some of the traditional Chinese food thgh long gone were the Kampong spirit ('Kampong' means 'village' in the Malay language) and associated festive mood. She did it illegally though at first, using gigantic oil tin to cook the dumpling along the corridor.

This year, she prepared just a handful using the gas stove. I have to say that she is a fantastic cook since she had been cooking and selling lots of traditional Chinese food to sell at streets when she was young. Didn't have much education cos people were mostly too poor to spend too many years in school, especially for girls. As she grew older each year, she cooked less and less and the taste kind of changed. I guess as people grow older, their preferences and cooking change as well. I have to say I'm not that enthusiastic about the traditional food now compared to the time when I was young. Maybe I no longer got to help prepare it personally or we just had too much good food now to appreciate things as we used to. I used to salivate over a bottle of coke, sipped hungrily from a small cup of chocolate milk (about once a month) or gobbled a bowl of instant noodles with egg hungrily that Mum had prepared for the four of us in a big pot. Even toasted bread with butter and Kaya jam was a rare treat that made me not want to go home cos I got to eat it at breakfast at my relative's house during the few days I was there. Really missed the good old days of my childhood. :P

See the other pics for more rice dumplings and other Asian food at under Food Glorious Food set at my flickr.

About 2-3 months ago, I started having thoughts of making felt rice dumplings but still haven't got an uninterrupted time to experiment with the patterns. It'll be probably quite hard to find an 'adopter' for it so if I make it, I will probably keep it or give it as a gift eventually. Initially, I had lots of craze ideas for my felt stuffs too but realised that while people may find unusual designs cute, it may be easier to find people who're willing to pay n 'adopt' it. I also had crazy ideas about making felt toilet row on hanger in a series of work involving a conversation of a mother with her son, the way they did for comic strips (just that my pics are represented by handmade felt crafts instead). Well, for the same reasons, I will KIV that plan. Already, it was hard to find 'adopters' for my felt donuts & coasters thgh many flickrers and frens complimented them. See how.^^

While I am really a terrible cook, I am quite a foodie, being 'pampered' in the area of food. Esp so since i spent my childhood in a kampong-like estate where there were lots of old folks who spent their free time cooking lots of traditional food to sell, such as Indian Rojak, fried onion kuey, all kinds of kuey kuey, mee hoon, Loh Mai Fun, Fried Kuey Tiao etc. I only got to taste the 'commericalised' version of many traditional food at hawker centre when we moved out of that place by the end of Primary 6. I have to say that most of those that I have tried at hawker centres 'can't fight' with those that i have tried when i was young. Old folks carried food in wooden containers and a portable charcoal stove balanced on a wooden pole on their shoulder. Since these old folks were doing it to kill time or earn extra pocket money in our neighbourhood then, the prices were really cheap. I remembered an old uncle coming around 8pm in the evening once a week selling barbecued pork puff (a bit like Old Chang Kee curry puffs, just that the filling is barbecued pork, like those in Char Siew buns). Just 50cents for a piping hot one n we could just walk out to him from your door. Even my classmate went around selling mee hoon in an old baby pram. There was even an old uncle who went around door to door giving haircut at $3. Just put a stool at your front door and he will cut it for you on the spot.

Folks chilled out at the common front yard in the evening, chatting with one another under the stars. I used to have 'candlelight dinner' at the stone table outside my house whenever there was a blackout. Lot of fun for kids whenever there was a blackout. I got to bathe or read my textbook under the candle light too. Suddenly, the mood to bathe or read my book was there whenever the blackout came and the candles we









asian girl baby oil








asian girl baby oil




California Baby Calming Massage Oil Aromatherapy - 4.5 oz






Developed by a mother. California Baby has your child?s best interest at heart. Their vegan oils are cold pressed, which means that no solvents are used for their extraction. They use only high quality, traditionally recommended oils that are safe, gentle and effective. Directions: Dispense a quarter-sized amound of oil into the palm of your hand, rub hands together vigorously to heat the oil before applying. Massage onto skin using gentle, circular strokes over chest, neck, upper back and feet. Works wonders at nap and bedtime!










Related topics:

baby boy outfits

pregnancy and baby books

baby girls names list

cosco baby cribs

baby adoption announcement

baby supply rental

baby girl sonogram pictures

baby shower invitations duck




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