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DECORATIVE PERFORATED METAL - DECORATIVE PERFORATED


Decorative perforated metal - Decorative wall paneling.



Decorative Perforated Metal





decorative perforated metal






    perforated metal
  • Expanded metal is a form of metal stock made by shearing a metal plate in a press, so that the metal stretches, leaving diamond-shaped voids surrounded by interlinked bars of the metal. The most common method of manufacture is to simultaneously slit and stretch the material with one motion.





    decorative
  • (decorativeness) an appearance that serves to decorate and make something more attractive

  • cosmetic: serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"

  • Serving to make something look more attractive; ornamental

  • Relating to decoration

  • (decoratively) in a decorative manner; "used decoratively at Christmas"











decorative perforated metal - Sono Wood




Sono Wood Pin Ice Cream Cap Perforated Metal Wrap With Mother Of Pearl Shell Inlay Hair Stick


Sono Wood Pin Ice Cream Cap Perforated Metal Wrap With Mother Of Pearl Shell Inlay Hair Stick



Hairsticks have been in use for thousands of years, and have been found in cultures of the Ancient Egyptians, Romans, Greeks and Japanese. They can be used in an assortment of different hair styles. Simply wind the hair around the stick and pin it in place, or you can thread it through a bun or other secured hair do. It is a timeless style that boasts organic elegance. They can be used on a daily basis or for an event of elaborate luxury. This hair stick is hand carved and polished to perfection. It's the perfefct hair accessory and will serve as a great gift for your lovely lady friends with long locks.










86% (18)





Hotel Theresa (Theresa Towers)




Hotel Theresa (Theresa Towers)





Harlem, Manhattan

The Hotel Theresa, built in 1912-13, was one of the major social centers of Harlem, serving from 1940 until its conversion into an office building in the late 1960s as one of the most important institutions for Harlem's African-American community. In addition to its historical importance, the hotel is a major work of the noted architectural firm of George & Edward Blum, and it exemplifies this firm's singular approach to ornamentation and inventive use of terra cotta. Although planned primarily as an apartment hotel, the Theresa also welcomed transient guests. In addition, the hotel contained a two-story dining room used for banquets, weddings, meetings, and other functions, and a bar and grill that became a major social center for Harlem's black celebrities during the 1940s and 1950s. During these decades, the Theresa was known as the "Waldorf of Harlem," playing host to many of America's most prominent black social, political, entertainment ,and sports figures as well as to many foreign dignitaries.

The Theresa was also home to important Harlem institutions, including the March Community Bookstore and Malcom X's Organization for Afro-American Unity. . The Theresa entered the national limelight in 1960 when Cuban premier Fidel Castro chose to stay at the hotel while visiting New York to speak at the United Nations General Assembly; while at the Theresa,, Castro hosted a visit from Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev. Encompassing the entire western blockfront of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Boulevard (originally Seventh Avenue), between West 124th and West 125th streets, the Theresa is one of the most visually striking structures in northern Manhattan with its projecting bays, arched surrounds and prominent gables.

Harlem and 125th Street: History and Development'

The village of Harlem, originally known as Nieuw Harlem (named for the Dutch city of Haarlem), was established by Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant in 1658. The village boundaries incorporated much of northern Manhattan, extending as far south as what is now East 74th Street near York Avenue. Although by 1683 Harlem was considered a part of the city and county of New York, it remained a relatively unpopulated area of farms and estates until after the Civil War. Major development was spurred by the opening of transit lines connecting the community with the larger city of New York to the south.

The earliest rail line to run through Harlem was the New York & Harlem Railroad (later incorporated into the New York Central Railroad), which started service along Fourth Avenue (now Park Avenue) in 1837. The advent of the elevated railroads provided Harlem residents with a relatively convenient means of commuting to downtown business and commercial districts. Three elevated lines inaugurated service to Harlem between 1878 and 1880, running along Second, Third, and Eighth avenues. The elevated lines were augmented in 1904 by service on New York City's first subway line. The Interborough Rapid Transit Company's subway ran from City Hall north to the Upper West Side, splitting at 96th Street into the Broadway Line to Washington Heights and the Lenox Line through Harlem (the present route of the Nos. 2 and 3 trains).

As Harlem became more closely linked to built-up parts of the metropolis, it generated interest from real estate speculators and builders. However, the entire Harlem area was not developed at one time. With the advantage of transit lines on Second, Third, and Fourth avenues, East Harlem was heavily developed by the mid-1880s, primarily with housing for working people. Central Harlem was far less developed in this period; single-family rowhouses, planned for affluent middle-class families, clustered on the blockfronts between 123rd and 135th streets east of Eighth Avenue, but virtually the entire area between Park Avenue and Ninth Avenue (now Morningside Avenue) from 110th to 123rd streets remained vacant until the 1890s and first years of the twentieth century.

During the era of major development in Harlem, following the opening of the elevated lines, 125th Street began to take on the character of a regional main street. Every one of the transit lines that ran through Harlem had a station on 125th Street. By 1885, several of Harlem's important institutional, cultural, and commercial organizations had built or rented space on the street. This was especially true in East Harlem where there were several important churches, the architecturally distinguished headquarters of the Mount Morris Bank (a designated New York City Landmark), and a number of civic installations, including a post office and courthouse in a building known as Harlem Hall. East 125th Street was also lined with many tenements and flats with stores at street level.

West 125th Street was less extensively built up than the eastern portion of the street. There were several prominent corner apartment houses, a number of rowhouses, and many mid-block











Hotel Theresa (Theresa Towers)




Hotel Theresa (Theresa Towers)





Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The Hotel Theresa, built in 1912-13, was one of the major social centers of Harlem, serving from 1940 until its conversion into an office building in the late 1960s as one of the most important institutions for Harlem's African-American community. In addition to its historical importance, the hotel is a major work of the noted architectural firm of George & Edward Blum, and it exemplifies this firm's singular approach to ornamentation and inventive use of terra cotta. Although planned primarily as an apartment hotel, the Theresa also welcomed transient guests. In addition, the hotel contained a two-story dining room used for banquets, weddings, meetings, and other functions, and a bar and grill that became a major social center for Harlem's black celebrities during the 1940s and 1950s. During these decades, the Theresa was known as the "Waldorf of Harlem," playing host to many of America's most prominent black social, political, entertainment ,and sports figures as well as to many foreign dignitaries.

The Theresa was also home to important Harlem institutions, including the March Community Bookstore and Malcom X's Organization for Afro-American Unity. . The Theresa entered the national limelight in 1960 when Cuban premier Fidel Castro chose to stay at the hotel while visiting New York to speak at the United Nations General Assembly; while at the Theresa,, Castro hosted a visit from Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev. Encompassing the entire western blockfront of Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Boulevard (originally Seventh Avenue), between West 124th and West 125th streets, the Theresa is one of the most visually striking structures in northern Manhattan with its projecting bays, arched surrounds and prominent gables.

Harlem and 125th Street: History and Development'

The village of Harlem, originally known as Nieuw Harlem (named for the Dutch city of Haarlem), was established by Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant in 1658. The village boundaries incorporated much of northern Manhattan, extending as far south as what is now East 74th Street near York Avenue. Although by 1683 Harlem was considered a part of the city and county of New York, it remained a relatively unpopulated area of farms and estates until after the Civil War. Major development was spurred by the opening of transit lines connecting the community with the larger city of New York to the south.

The earliest rail line to run through Harlem was the New York & Harlem Railroad (later incorporated into the New York Central Railroad), which started service along Fourth Avenue (now Park Avenue) in 1837. The advent of the elevated railroads provided Harlem residents with a relatively convenient means of commuting to downtown business and commercial districts. Three elevated lines inaugurated service to Harlem between 1878 and 1880, running along Second, Third, and Eighth avenues. The elevated lines were augmented in 1904 by service on New York City's first subway line. The Interborough Rapid Transit Company's subway ran from City Hall north to the Upper West Side, splitting at 96th Street into the Broadway Line to Washington Heights and the Lenox Line through Harlem (the present route of the Nos. 2 and 3 trains).

As Harlem became more closely linked to built-up parts of the metropolis, it generated interest from real estate speculators and builders. However, the entire Harlem area was not developed at one time. With the advantage of transit lines on Second, Third, and Fourth avenues, East Harlem was heavily developed by the mid-1880s, primarily with housing for working people. Central Harlem was far less developed in this period; single-family rowhouses, planned for affluent middle-class families, clustered on the blockfronts between 123rd and 135th streets east of Eighth Avenue, but virtually the entire area between Park Avenue and Ninth Avenue (now Morningside Avenue) from 110th to 123rd streets remained vacant until the 1890s and first years of the twentieth century.

During the era of major development in Harlem, following the opening of the elevated lines, 125th Street began to take on the character of a regional main street. Every one of the transit lines that ran through Harlem had a station on 125th Street. By 1885, several of Harlem's important institutional, cultural, and commercial organizations had built or rented space on the street. This was especially true in East Harlem where there were several important churches, the architecturally distinguished headquarters of the Mount Morris Bank (a designated New York City Landmark), and a number of civic installations, including a post office and courthouse in a building known as Harlem Hall. East 125th Street was also lined with many tenements and flats with stores at street level.

West 125th Street was less extensively built up than the eastern portion of the street. There were several prominent corner apartment houses, a









decorative perforated metal







See also:

decorate your room online

horse race decorations

western wall decorations

victorian christmas decorations

mexican table decor

decorations for the office

bear nursery decor

blog decorations





Post je objavljen 03.10.2011. u 20:21 sati.