AVERAGE CALORIES IN A DAY

27.10.2011., četvrtak

INTENSIVE WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAM. INTENSIVE WEIGHT


INTENSIVE WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAM. DOES APPLE CIDER VINEGAR HELP WITH WEIGHT LOSS



Intensive Weight Loss Program





intensive weight loss program






    weight loss
  • Weight Loss is a 2006 novel by Upamanyu Chatterjee.

  • "Weight Loss" is the fifth season premiere of the American comedy television series The Office, and the show's seventy-third (and seventy-fourth) episode overall.

  • Weight loss, in the context of medicine, health or physical fitness, is a reduction of the total body mass, due to a mean loss of fluid, body fat or adipose tissue and/or lean mass, namely bone mineral deposits, muscle, tendon and other connective tissue.





    intensive
  • intensifier: a modifier that has little meaning except to intensify the meaning it modifies; "`up' in `finished up' is an intensifier"; "`honestly' in `I honestly don't know' is an intensifier"

  • tending to give force or emphasis; "an intensive adverb"

  • (of agriculture) Aiming to achieve the highest possible level of production within a limited area, esp. by using chemical and technological aids

  • characterized by a high degree or intensity; often used as a combining form; "the questioning was intensive"; "intensive care"; "research-intensive"; "a labor-intensive industry"

  • Concentrated on a single area or subject or into a short time; very thorough or vigorous

  • (typically in business and economics) Concentrating on or making much use of a specified thing





    program
  • arrange a program of or for; "program the 80th birthday party"

  • plan: a series of steps to be carried out or goals to be accomplished; "they drew up a six-step plan"; "they discussed plans for a new bond issue"

  • Input (instructions for the automatic performance of a task) into a computer or other machine

  • Provide (a computer or other machine) with coded instructions for the automatic performance of a particular task

  • Cause (a person or animal) to behave in a predetermined way

  • write a computer program











intensive weight loss program - Minna -




Minna - Emergency Workout


Minna - Emergency Workout



"Lose weight and tone your body in just six weeks!" claims the back cover of Emergency Workout. Don't expect to look like gorgeous Minna Lessig, former Ms. Fitness USA and National Fitness champion, in that time, but do expect to have fun getting into shape with these two well-designed, high-energy, 30-minute workouts.
Remember the pre-hip-hop era of aerobic dance when we were doing cha cha, salsa, mambo, grapevines, and hip-swinging, feel-good combinations that kept our heart rates and moods up without taxing our minds terribly much? That's what Lessig gives us in the aerobic segment. The dance moves are just challenging enough to be fun and give us a sense of accomplishment, without being a major learning endeavor. Lessig teaches the routines smoothly and expertly, a move at a time. Her two female assistants, their faces animated, seem to be having a great time, too.
The second workout is a non-stop weight segment using dumbbells. Lessig's routine is an interesting mix of combination moves, such as biceps curls with lunges, or leg extensions with lateral raises, sometimes involving balance. The only problem is that you have no time to change weights between muscle groups, so you have to go light. Each workout has its own warm-up and cooldown, so you can alternate them on different days, or blitz yourself by doing the whole hour. A sample 1,100- to 1,200-calorie diet menu is included. --Joan Price










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Sarus Crane- Courtship




Sarus Crane- Courtship





Courtship and breeding
Sarus Cranes are known for their loud trumpeting calls. The loud trumpeting calls are like in other cranes possible by the elongated trachea that form coils within the sternal region.[15] Pairs may indulge in spectacular displays of calling in unison and posturing. These include "dancing" movements that are performed both during and outside the breeding season and involve a short series of jumping and bowing or going in circles. Dancing may also be shown as a displacement activity when the nest or young are threatened.[6] They breed during the monsoons in India (from July to October although there may be a second brood[10] and there are records of breeding at other times of the year-May[16] and February[17][18][19]),[5] and with the onset of the wet season in Australia. They build a large nests, platforms made of reeds and vegetation in wet marshes or paddy fields.[20] The platform nests can be more than two metres in diameter and nearly a metre high.[21] Pairs shows high fidelity to the nest site often reusing nests over as many as five years.[22] The clutch is 1 or 2 eggs (rarely 3) which are incubated by both sexes[23] for about 31 days (range 27-35 days). Eggs are chalky white and weigh about 240 grams.[6]The eggshells are removed by the parents after the chicks hatch either by carrying away the fragments or by swallowing them.[24] Chicks stay along with their parents for a long duration of more than three months.[


The Sarus Crane, Grus antigone is a large crane that is a resident breeding bird with disjunct populations that are found in parts of South Asia, Southeast Asia and Australia. Standing at a height of about 1.8 m,[3] the tallest of the flying birds, they are conspicuous and iconic[4] species of open marshlands. Their numbers have declined greatly in the last century and it has been estimated that the current population is only 10% or even just 2.5% of the numbers that existed in the 1850s. The stronghold of the species is in India, where it is traditionally revered and has adapted to live in close proximity with humans. The species has been extirpated in many parts of the large range.

Adults birds are very large with grey wings and body; a bare red head and part of the upper neck; a whitish crown; and a long dark pointed bill. In flight, the long neck is held straight, unlike a heron that folds it back, and the black wing tips can be seen; their long red or pink legs trail behind them. They have a grey ear covert patch, a reddish iris and a greenish grey bill. Juveniles have a pinkish base to the bill and the head is fully feathered and grey.[5] The bare head and neck has red skin that is brighter during the breeding season. The skin is rough and covered by papillae and a narrow area around behind the head is covered by black bristly feathers. The sexes do not differ in colour although males are larger on average than females; Indian males can attain a maximum height of approximately 200 cm (6.6 ft), with a wingspan of 250 cm (8.5 ft), making them the world's tallest living flying bird. The average weight of nominate race individuals is 6.8-7.8 kg, while five adult sharpii averaged 8.4 kg.[6] Across the range, weight can vary from 5 to 12 kg (11-26 lbs), height typically from 115 to 167 cm (45-69 in) and the wingspan from 220 to 280 cm (87-110 in). Birds from Australia tend to be smaller than birds from the north.

There were about an estimated 15-20,000 mature Sarus Cranes left in the wild in 2009.[1] The Indian population is less than 10,000 birds but is the strongest population. They are considered sacred and the birds are traditionally left unharmed[32] and in many areas they are unafraid of humans. They used to be found on occasion in Pakistan, but not seen since the late 1980s. The population has however declined.[1] Estimates of the global population sest that the population in 2000 was at best about 10% and at the worst just 2.5% of the numbers that existed in 1850.[33] Many farmers in India believe that these crane damage standing crops,[34] particularly rice, although studies show that direct feeding on rice grains resulted in losses amounting to less than 1 percent and trampling could account for grain loss of about 0.4-15 kilograms.[35] The attitude of farmers tends to be positive in spite of these damages and this has helped in conserving the species within agricultural areas. Compensating farmers for crop losses has been sested as a measure that may help.[25] The Australian population is higher than 5,000 birds and may be increasing,[8] however, the Southeast Asian subspecies has been decimated by war and habitat modification and destruction (such as intensive agriculture and draining of wetlands) and by the mid-20th century had disappeared from large parts of its range which once stretched up to southern China; some 1500–2000 birds are left in several fragmented subpopulations. The little-known Philippine population became extinct in the











Sarus-Crane




Sarus-Crane





The Sarus Crane, Grus antigone is a large crane that is a resident breeding bird with disjunct populations that are found in parts of South Asia, Southeast Asia and Australia. Standing at a height of about 1.8 m,[3] the tallest of the flying birds, they are conspicuous and iconic[4] species of open marshlands. Their numbers have declined greatly in the last century and it has been estimated that the current population is only 10% or even just 2.5% of the numbers that existed in the 1850s. The stronghold of the species is in India, where it is traditionally revered and has adapted to live in close proximity with humans. The species has been extirpated in many parts of the large range.

Adults birds are very large with grey wings and body; a bare red head and part of the upper neck; a whitish crown; and a long dark pointed bill. In flight, the long neck is held straight, unlike a heron that folds it back, and the black wing tips can be seen; their long red or pink legs trail behind them. They have a grey ear covert patch, a reddish iris and a greenish grey bill. Juveniles have a pinkish base to the bill and the head is fully feathered and grey.[5] The bare head and neck has red skin that is brighter during the breeding season. The skin is rough and covered by papillae and a narrow area around behind the head is covered by black bristly feathers. The sexes do not differ in colour although males are larger on average than females; Indian males can attain a maximum height of approximately 200 cm (6.6 ft), with a wingspan of 250 cm (8.5 ft), making them the world's tallest living flying bird. The average weight of nominate race individuals is 6.8-7.8 kg, while five adult sharpii averaged 8.4 kg.[6] Across the range, weight can vary from 5 to 12 kg (11-26 lbs), height typically from 115 to 167 cm (45-69 in) and the wingspan from 220 to 280 cm (87-110 in). Birds from Australia tend to be smaller than birds from the north.

There were about an estimated 15-20,000 mature Sarus Cranes left in the wild in 2009.[1] The Indian population is less than 10,000 birds but is the strongest population. They are considered sacred and the birds are traditionally left unharmed[32] and in many areas they are unafraid of humans. They used to be found on occasion in Pakistan, but not seen since the late 1980s. The population has however declined.[1] Estimates of the global population sest that the population in 2000 was at best about 10% and at the worst just 2.5% of the numbers that existed in 1850.[33] Many farmers in India believe that these crane damage standing crops,[34] particularly rice, although studies show that direct feeding on rice grains resulted in losses amounting to less than 1 percent and trampling could account for grain loss of about 0.4-15 kilograms.[35] The attitude of farmers tends to be positive in spite of these damages and this has helped in conserving the species within agricultural areas. Compensating farmers for crop losses has been sested as a measure that may help.[25] The Australian population is higher than 5,000 birds and may be increasing,[8] however, the Southeast Asian subspecies has been decimated by war and habitat modification and destruction (such as intensive agriculture and draining of wetlands) and by the mid-20th century had disappeared from large parts of its range which once stretched up to southern China; some 1500–2000 birds are left in several fragmented subpopulations. The little-known Philippine population became extinct in the late 1960s.[1]

As a species, the Sarus crane is classified as Vulnerable (A2cde + 3cde). This means that the global population has declined by about a third since 1980, and is expected to continue to do so until the late 2010s. Threats constitute habitat destruction and/or degradation, hunting and collecting, as well as environmental pollution and possibly diseases or competing species. Inbreeding effects should be monitored in the Australian population.[8]

The species has been extirpated in Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand. Reintroduction programs planned in Thailand have made use of birds from Cambodia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia









intensive weight loss program








intensive weight loss program




Certification and Core Review for Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing






The only exam review for the two leading neonatal critical-care nursing certification examinations, Certification and Core Review for Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing, 4th Edition prepares you for your exam with realistic questions and test simulation. Based on the blueprints of the AACN's CCRN-Neonatal exam and the NCC's Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing (RNC-NIC) exam, review questions cover the information in Core Curriculum for Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing, 3rd Edition, and reflect essential knowledge, the latest evidence, and best practices. A total of 600 questions and answers with rationales are provided both online and in the book. Online, you can choose either the AACN or NCC format, and review material either in Study mode or in Examination mode. Developed by the AACN, AWHONN, and NANN, this powerful review tool offers excellent preparation for your certification exam!


Endorsed by the three most authoritative associations in neonatal intensive care nursing: the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN); the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN); and the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN).

Answers are provided for each question, accompanied by rationales and references, to enhance your understanding of the material.

Realistic exam practice is offered through questions that mirror the certification exam content, the multiple-choice question format, and the distribution of content.



Online exam simulation, included free with this text, mirrors the test-taking experience with an interactive, timed format.

The online dual blueprint organization offers questions organized according to either of the two major certification examinations: the AACN's CCRN-Neonatal exam and the NCC's Neonatal Intensive Care (RNC-NIC) exam.

Updated questions reflect the information in Core Curriculum for Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing, 4th Edition, and the latest test plans by both AACN and NCC.

Two modes of online study let you choose whether to work through the questions in Study Mode or Examination Simulation.

A flexible format in online exams tailors the test plan and question format to the preferred examination, either the AACN or NCC.

Complete remediation includes rationales for both correct and incorrect answers.

A compact, portable size makes the book easier to study anytime, anywhere.










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