1 2 CCD CAMERA

26.10.2011., srijeda

LOW SPEED DOME CAMERA. DOME CAMERA


Low speed dome camera. Video camera mini dv tape.



Low Speed Dome Camera





low speed dome camera






    dome camera
  • A type of camera with dome cover. They may have fixed or vari-focal lenses. Some come with infrared lighting and some are designed to be tamper-proof (also referred to as vandal-resistant). Armor dome cameras are designed to resist vandalism by using a hi-impact reinforced polycarbonate dome casing.





    low speed
  • Outdated, obsolete, worthless (synonym of "high drag").

  • Gearing provided in an automobile which causes greater number of revolutions of engine as compared to driving wheel

  • The largest diesel engines are used to power ships. These monstrous engines have power outputs over 80,000 kW, turn at about 60 to 100 rpm, and are up to 15 m tall.











low speed dome camera - Aluminum Dome




Aluminum Dome Indoor Security Camera - 520 TV lines 3.6mm Len Wide Angle View. Good for Indoor Surveillance. 0 Lux Minimum Illumination


Aluminum Dome Indoor Security Camera - 520 TV lines 3.6mm Len Wide Angle View. Good for Indoor Surveillance. 0 Lux Minimum Illumination



Camera Specifications: Model GW726B Pick up Element Color 1/3" CCD Effective Picture Elements (H*V) NTSC: 811 x 508, PAL: 795 x 596 Horizontal Resolution 520TV Lines S/N Ratio More than 48dB Clock Frequency (MHZ) NTSC: 28.636, PAL: 28.375 Scanning System 2:1 interlace Minimum Illumination 0 Lux (with IR LED ON) Synchronous System Internal, Negative Sync. Auto Electronic Shutter NTSC: 1/60s~1/100,000s, PAL:1/50s~1/100,000s Gamma Characteristic 0.45 IR Project Distance 65.6 feet (with 23 unit infrared LED) IR Status Under 10 Lux by CDS IR Power On CDS Auto Control Video Output 1Vpp, 75? Auto Gain Control Auto Power/Current 12VDC(+/-10%)/300mA Lens 3.6mm Dimension (mm) ?94 x 68.5 Storage Temperature -30?C ~ +60?C Operating Temperature -10?C ~ +45?C










78% (11)





Upper Antelope slot canyon




Upper Antelope slot canyon





0 PHOTOGRAPH PARTICULARS 0

Our Navajo guide drove the tour pickup truck like a demolition race driver, but played the native flute in the slot canyon, like a prince. The three Japanese photographers, who completed the “client” group, with Ed and me - were fun, polite, and dedicated to their photography.

Upper Antelope slot canyon is a short canyon. It seemed little over 100 yards long to me, but the tour pamphlets list it as longer. I’m glad I went. The lighting in Upper Antelope was far too challenging for my photography skills and stubborn refusal to use a tripod. A sturdy full size tripod is pretty much a requirement to get “good” photographs in this canyon.

I’m not a “tour group” guy (I’m the antithesis), so I much preferred my 2008 experience with Lower Antelope slot canyon. It was prettier, better lighting, you could drive to it yourself, no guide required, and no time limit on how much time you spent in the slot canyon.

So, I offer up a few snapshots, taken hand held with a point and shoot Canon for my memories, and to give any thinking of doing the same tour, some glimpse of the experience.

0 ACTIVITIES DAY NINE OF TWELVE 0

Making one motel reservation after another and staying one night allowed us to cover a lot of territory. We stayed in Motel 6s whenever possible. It is easy to make reservations and if plans change, they have a generous and easy to achieve cancellation policy.

That said it was a real treat when we made reservations for two nights in a row. We did this at Moab and we did this at Page. You get a lot more quality use out of your rooms this way and it nice to break up the constant long distance travel each day, even if you are seeing lots of cool stuff.

So when we left our motel rooms Tuesday morning, we left most of our stuff at the motel and took only what we needed for the “Wave lottery” and the Upper Antelope slot canyon tour, with us in the Jeep.

There were some nice photo ops driving to the Paria River Rangers’ station that morning. The sky was clear and the morning sun is always great hitting the sandstone cliffs and mesas. We were not successful in winning a spot for Wednesday morning to hike the Wave. Only ten people get the walk in permit by lottery and there were 52 of us there hoping to get one. We shred off the attempt and headed for the tour guide headquarters for our Upper Antelope tour.

By the time we had finished the Upper Antelope tour I was disappointed and considered it the least desirable stop of the entire road trip, along with the Zuni Pueblo visit. But time puts things in perspective. Now I’m glad I went. The Martres photo guidebook I had along with me, warned that taking good photos in Upper Antelope was a “challenge” and I knew I would be using either my Canon G9 or G10 and stubbornly refuse to use a tripod, though I took a small metal tripod with me.

When the company switched us from the promised ride in the Suburban to the back of a bouncy exhaust fume filled pickup truck I was irritated, but not too much. The ride up the wash was kind of fun, despite the fumes. Then when we got inside Upper Antelope, Ed and the three Japanese clients with their expensive and cameras and tripods accepted that I was along for the hike and didn’t let it bother them at all that I was going to try to take photos with an advanced point and shoot rather than a DSLR with correct lens, and sturdy tripod.

Our guide however asked to see my camera when we were a short ways into Upper Antelope and before I knew what he was doing he started changing all the settings on my camera saying “too many automatic settings”. Well I kept my cool but it really made me mad. I asked him to return my camera and to return ALL the settings he had changed back to those I had on “my” camera, before he started making all the changes.

From then on all got better. The guide accepted me as an old stubborn, (probably stupid), hiker and snapshot artist, instead of a serious photographer. All of us got along famously and I was really pleased to see Ed in his element with some serious photography challenges and opportunities. The three Japanese were first class all the way, letting me take my turn at photo ops and always smiling and enjoying the canyon photo ops experience.

By the time our time was up in Upper Antelope Canyon we were all happy. Our guide played his flute inside the slot canyon and did a great job of it. The flute playing “fit” and added to the experience.

Out of the photos I took in Upper Antelope Canyon more than half of them were badly blurred, no matter how steady I thought I was holding my camera with the slow shutter speed required of the reduced and contrasting light. BUT the photos that did come out are memory makers for me. It will remind me of the fun time I had despite the “rocky” start.

In 2008, Ed, photographer friend John, and my youngest son, all visited Lower Antelope Canyon. Here you can drive your own vehicle to the trailhead; no guide required; no constra











"The group" Elephant rock










0 PHOTOGRAPH PARTICULARS 0

OMT left; Oldwranger (Ed) right; three nice Japanese photographers center. Notice the rock "elephants facing left right above us.

Our Navajo guide drove the tour pickup truck like a demolition race driver, but played the native flute in the slot canyon, like a prince. The three Japanese photographers, who completed the “client” group, with Ed and me - were fun, polite, and dedicated to their photography.

Upper Antelope slot canyon is a short canyon. It seemed little over 100 yards long to me, but the tour pamphlets list it as longer. I’m glad I went. The lighting in Upper Antelope was far too challenging for my photography skills and stubborn refusal to use a tripod. A sturdy full size tripod is pretty much a requirement to get “good” photographs in this canyon.

I’m not a “tour group” guy (I’m the antithesis), so I much preferred my 2008 experience with Lower Antelope slot canyon. It was prettier, better lighting, you could drive to it yourself, no guide required, and no time limit on how much time you spent in the slot canyon.

So, I offer up a few snapshots, taken hand held with a point and shoot Canon for my memories, and to give any thinking of doing the same tour, some glimpse of the experience.

0 ACTIVITIES DAY NINE OF TWELVE 0

Making one motel reservation after another and staying one night allowed us to cover a lot of territory. We stayed in Motel 6s whenever possible. It is easy to make reservations and if plans change, they have a generous and easy to achieve cancellation policy.

That said it was a real treat when we made reservations for two nights in a row. We did this at Moab and we did this at Page. You get a lot more quality use out of your rooms this way and it nice to break up the constant long distance travel each day, even if you are seeing lots of cool stuff.

So when we left our motel rooms Tuesday morning, we left most of our stuff at the motel and took only what we needed for the “Wave lottery” and the Upper Antelope slot canyon tour, with us in the Jeep.

There were some nice photo ops driving to the Paria River Rangers’ station that morning. The sky was clear and the morning sun is always great hitting the sandstone cliffs and mesas. We were not successful in winning a spot for Wednesday morning to hike the Wave. Only ten people get the walk in permit by lottery and there were 52 of us there hoping to get one. We shred off the attempt and headed for the tour guide headquarters for our Upper Antelope tour.

By the time we had finished the Upper Antelope tour I was disappointed and considered it the least desirable stop of the entire road trip, along with the Zuni Pueblo visit. But time puts things in perspective. Now I’m glad I went. The Martres photo guidebook I had along with me, warned that taking good photos in Upper Antelope was a “challenge” and I knew I would be using either my Canon G9 or G10 and stubbornly refuse to use a tripod, though I took a small metal tripod with me.

When the company switched us from the promised ride in the Suburban to the back of a bouncy exhaust fume filled pickup truck I was irritated, but not too much. The ride up the wash was kind of fun, despite the fumes. Then when we got inside Upper Antelope, Ed and the three Japanese clients with their expensive and cameras and tripods accepted that I was along for the hike and didn’t let it bother them at all that I was going to try to take photos with an advanced point and shoot rather than a DSLR with correct lens, and sturdy tripod.

Our guide however asked to see my camera when we were a short ways into Upper Antelope and before I knew what he was doing he started changing all the settings on my camera saying “too many automatic settings”. Well I kept my cool but it really made me mad. I asked him to return my camera and to return ALL the settings he had changed back to those I had on “my” camera, before he started making all the changes.

From then on all got better. The guide accepted me as an old stubborn, (probably stupid), hiker and snapshot artist, instead of a serious photographer. All of us got along famously and I was really pleased to see Ed in his element with some serious photography challenges and opportunities. The three Japanese were first class all the way, letting me take my turn at photo ops and always smiling and enjoying the canyon photo ops experience.

By the time our time was up in Upper Antelope Canyon we were all happy. Our guide played his flute inside the slot canyon and did a great job of it. The flute playing “fit” and added to the experience.

Out of the photos I took in Upper Antelope Canyon more than half of them were badly blurred, no matter how steady I thought I was holding my camera with the slow shutter speed required of the reduced and contrasting light. BUT the photos that did come out are memory makers for me. It will remind me of the fun time I had despite the “rocky” start.

In 2008, Ed, photographer friend John, and









low speed dome camera








low speed dome camera




Speco Technologies Indoor/Outdoor Color Speed Dome Camera






1/4" ExViewO color CCD with 480 lines of resolution
18x optical zoom with auto-focus, 12x digital zoom
0.01 lux minimum illumination with IR cut filter removed
Day/night operation with auto-iris and manual override keys
4.8" dome with 6"

The SPECO CVC-927PTZ Indoor/Outdoor Speed Dome Color Camera combines a responsive pan/tilt movement, auto focus, low-light sensitivity, and a powerful zoom with a rich feature set making it ideal for highly sophisticated surveillance and security systems that require orientation and focus on details. With its weather-resistant design allowing for indoor and outdoor use, and its automatic daytime-to-nighttime viewing functionality, the SPECO CVC-927PTZ is perfect for a wide range of applications including the monitoring of people and property in most any situation.
This integrated PTZ (pan/tilt/zoom) dome camera utilizes a 0.25-inch color Sony Exview HAD CCD (charge-coupled device) image sensor with a 4.1- to 73.8-millimeter varifocal lens with auto focus. The CVC-927PTZ achieves a high resolution with 480 horizontal TVL (TV lines) and up to 768-by-494 effective picture elements via the NTSC signal system. This unit includes an extraordinary 18x optical and 12x digital zoom that allows you can clearly pick out even the most distant objects, and a S/N (signal-to-noise) ratio of better than 60 dB. The SPECO CVC-927PTZ features a wide dynamic range of operation, and includes eight alarm inputs and four alarm for connecting external devices. Already sensitive to light with a minimum illumination of 0.7 Lux in color to infinity, this unit automatically switches to black-and-white in night-mode with a minimum illumination 0.15 Lux in nightmode. If further sensitivity is required, you can remove the IR (infrared) cut filter from the camera, causing the camera to only transmit B/W images and thereby lowering the camera's minimum illumination to 0.01 Lux.
The SPECO CVC-927PTZ has a full pan-angle range of 360 degrees with a tilt range from 0-90 degrees, and includes an auto-flip that rotates your picture 180-degrees at tilt's bottom (for continuous in-motion coverage as something passes beneath the camera). Speeds can range from 0.1 to 90-degrees per second, with a maximum turbo speed of 360-degrees per second panning. This unit features eight preset tours and allows other tours to be programmed with functions and preset locations, as well as eight auto-scans including vector scan, four patterns and eight privacy zones. The CVC-927PTZ also features an onscreen display of camera ID and area name, and an operating temperature of 32 to 122 degrees Fahrenheit. This camera also includes a built-in RS-485 connection for allowing remote operation from many devices such as controllers or DVRs, and runs on 24-volts of DC power with a built-in power-line surge.
Technical Features:
Sensitivity: minimum illumination of 0.7 Lux in color and 0.15 Lux in B/W, or 0.01 Lux without IR cut filter
Effective pixels: up to 768 by 494 pixels
Zoom: 18x optical and 12x digital
Pan/Tilt: 360-degrees of panning, 0-90 degree tilt with auto-flip function
Dimensions: 5 x 8 inches (diameter x depth)
The SPECO CVC-927PTZ surveillance camera is a reliable, economical and high-quality solution for demanding interactive surveillance. The CVC-927PTZ is designed to work with a wide variety of SPECO accessories such as an optional housing with a heater and blower for extremely cold environments, so you can integrate it in to virtually any system. User's should note, however, that the camera's image sensor may become permanently damaged if exposed to long hours of direct sunlight or halogen light, so the camera should not be mounted or pointed directly at the sun or other bright-light sources. This camera also requires a PC that is not included in this package in order to take advantage of the Internet functionality.
About Surveillance Camera Technical Features
Lux rating is the measurement used to indicate how sensitive a camera is to light, and stands for the level of light reflected off a piece of paper by a candle from one meter away. Thus a sensitivity of three Lux would mean a camera could generate an acceptable picture of a piece-of-paper-sized object that was illuminated by the equivalent of three candles from one meter away. The lower the Lux level, the better the camera's ability to work in low-light conditions. The camera's resolution should be greater than or equal to the resolution supported by the system's recorder or monitor. The S/N, or signal to noise ratio, is an important measure of a camera's quality. A poor camera, low-light conditions or poor wiring causes "noise" which consumes processing power and disk space. A camera with a wide dynamic range is ideal, especially for recording areas in which both indoor and outdoor light are present. CCD (charge-coupled device) sensors provide high-quality images that are less susceptible to noise. CMOS (complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor) sensors offer less image quality, but are usually more cost-effective and energy efficient.
About Pan/Tilt Cameras
A Pan/Tilt Camera has the ability to pan ("move" horizontally), or tilt ("move" vertically). IP cameras often have pan/tilt capability. A pan/tilt camera is ideal for monitoring of situations that need a continual real-time adjustment of the views.










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