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Planet – Movs.World
Tonga islands in lockdown following detection of two Covid-19 cases
Greenland’s ice sheet has lost 4.7 trillion tonnes since 2002
“Coffee gets foamy”
two discourses oppose each other in the face of the challenge of ecological transition
after more than two months of closure, Morocco will reopen its airspace on February 7
twelve days after the volcanic eruption, inhabitants of the Tonga islands testify
“Epidemics can never be reduced to biological causes”
France’s energy independence thanks to nuclear power? A statistical sleight of hand and 100% import
the struggle of agricultural workers in Nicaragua taken to French justice
clashes between demonstrators and police in Brussels

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                    [title] => Tonga islands in lockdown following detection of two Covid-19 cases
                    [link] => https://movs.world/planet/tonga-islands-in-lockdown-following-detection-of-two-covid-19-cases/
                    [dc] => Array
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                            [creator] => Susan Hally
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                    [pubdate] => Wed, 02 Feb 2022 01:03:28 +0000
                    [category] => PlanetcasesCovid19DetectionIslandslockdownTonga
                    [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/tonga-islands-in-lockdown-following-detection-of-two-covid-19-cases/
                    [description] => The team of the Australian ship “Adelaide”, in Nuku’alofa, January 27, 2022. CPL ROBERT WHITMORE / AFP The Tonga Islands will enter confinement on Wednesday February 2 due to the detection of two cases of Covid-19, a new blow for this Pacific kingdom which is struggling to recover from the devastating volcanic eruption and tsunami ... Read more
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The Tonga Islands will enter confinement on Wednesday February 2 due to the detection of two cases of Covid-19, a new blow for this Pacific kingdom which is struggling to recover from the devastating volcanic eruption and tsunami of the mid-January, officials said.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers “It was apocalyptic”: twelve days after the volcanic eruption, inhabitants of the Tonga islands testify

The island nation was so far one of the few places on the planet to have been spared the virus, but Prime Minister Siaosi Sovaleni said the two men who tested positive this week in Nuku’alofa had worked in the port of the capital, where humanitarian aid has been pouring in from all over the world since January 15. The volcanic eruption, one of the largest in decades, blanketed Tonga in toxic ash, killing three people.

Only one case of Covid-19 in October 2021

The archipelago closed its borders at the beginning of 2020, due to the pandemic caused by the coronavirus. Since then, this country of 100,000 inhabitants had recorded only one case of Covid-19, that of a man who arrived from New Zealand in October 2021 and who has since fully recovered.

After the volcanic eruption and tsunami, ships from the Australian, New Zealand, United States, French and British navies delivered aid. All deliveries were made in accordance with strict protocols of « non-contact » to keep the virus at bay.

Mr Sovaleni said the two men affected were asymptomatic and doubly vaccinated, like about 85% of the population of Tonga.

The Australian ship Adelaide docked in Nuku’alofa last week to unload aid, when around 20 members of her crew were infected with the virus.

The World with AFP

) [summary] => The team of the Australian ship “Adelaide”, in Nuku’alofa, January 27, 2022. CPL ROBERT WHITMORE / AFP The Tonga Islands will enter confinement on Wednesday February 2 due to the detection of two cases of Covid-19, a new blow for this Pacific kingdom which is struggling to recover from the devastating volcanic eruption and tsunami ... Read more [atom_content] =>

The Tonga Islands will enter confinement on Wednesday February 2 due to the detection of two cases of Covid-19, a new blow for this Pacific kingdom which is struggling to recover from the devastating volcanic eruption and tsunami of the mid-January, officials said.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers “It was apocalyptic”: twelve days after the volcanic eruption, inhabitants of the Tonga islands testify

The island nation was so far one of the few places on the planet to have been spared the virus, but Prime Minister Siaosi Sovaleni said the two men who tested positive this week in Nuku’alofa had worked in the port of the capital, where humanitarian aid has been pouring in from all over the world since January 15. The volcanic eruption, one of the largest in decades, blanketed Tonga in toxic ash, killing three people.

Only one case of Covid-19 in October 2021

The archipelago closed its borders at the beginning of 2020, due to the pandemic caused by the coronavirus. Since then, this country of 100,000 inhabitants had recorded only one case of Covid-19, that of a man who arrived from New Zealand in October 2021 and who has since fully recovered.

After the volcanic eruption and tsunami, ships from the Australian, New Zealand, United States, French and British navies delivered aid. All deliveries were made in accordance with strict protocols of « non-contact » to keep the virus at bay.

Mr Sovaleni said the two men affected were asymptomatic and doubly vaccinated, like about 85% of the population of Tonga.

The Australian ship Adelaide docked in Nuku’alofa last week to unload aid, when around 20 members of her crew were infected with the virus.

The World with AFP

[date_timestamp] => 1643763808 ) [1] => Array ( [title] => Greenland’s ice sheet has lost 4.7 trillion tonnes since 2002 [link] => https://movs.world/planet/greenlands-ice-sheet-has-lost-4-7-trillion-tonnes-since-2002/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Tue, 01 Feb 2022 15:02:33 +0000 [category] => PlanetGreenlandsicelostsheettonnestrillion [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/greenlands-ice-sheet-has-lost-4-7-trillion-tonnes-since-2002/ [description] => Apusiajik Glacier, near Kulusuk, on the southeast coast of Greenland, August 17, 2019. JONATHAN NACKSTRAND / AFP This is one of the illustrations of global warming. Greenland’s huge ice cap has lost 4.7 trillion tonnes in 20 years, alone contributing to a 1.2 centimeter rise in the oceans, according to new data released this week ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

This is one of the illustrations of global warming. Greenland’s huge ice cap has lost 4.7 trillion tonnes in 20 years, alone contributing to a 1.2 centimeter rise in the oceans, according to new data released this week by the Polar Portal, an organization umbrella of the Danish Arctic Institutes.

This volume of melted ice is particularly important on the coasts of the Danish autonomous territory, according to this study based on satellite observations from the Grace program.

“The data show that the majority of ice loss is occurring at the edges of the ice sheet, where independent observations show ice is shrinking, glacial fronts are receding into fjords and onshore, and melting is stronger on the surface of the ice », points out the Polar Portal. The west coast of Greenland is particularly affected, according to its data.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Global warming is destabilizing the poles more than ever

Acceleration of global warming

Global warming is particularly alarming in the Arctic, where it has occurred in recent decades at a rate three or even four times higher than the rest of the planet, according to the latest scientific studies.

According to a study published at the end of January by NASA, the accelerated melting near the coasts is explained by the warming of the waters of the Arctic Ocean, which contributes “at least as much as the air at the surface” to the decline of the Greenland ice cap.

The melting of the ice in Greenland is currently the main factor in the rise of the oceans on Earth and the glaciers of the territory are now retreating six to seven times faster than twenty-five years ago, according to the American agency.

According to climatologists, the Greenland ice cap contains a total of enough to raise the oceans by more than 7 meters, and Antarctica by almost 50 meters, even if the melting processes are very slow phenomena.

At the same time, the Arctic sea ice – the melting of which, on the other hand, has no effect on the level of the oceans – has also retreated considerably, losing on average almost 13% of its surface every ten years.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Climate: the last seven years are the hottest on record

The World with AFP

) [summary] => Apusiajik Glacier, near Kulusuk, on the southeast coast of Greenland, August 17, 2019. JONATHAN NACKSTRAND / AFP This is one of the illustrations of global warming. Greenland’s huge ice cap has lost 4.7 trillion tonnes in 20 years, alone contributing to a 1.2 centimeter rise in the oceans, according to new data released this week ... Read more [atom_content] =>

This is one of the illustrations of global warming. Greenland’s huge ice cap has lost 4.7 trillion tonnes in 20 years, alone contributing to a 1.2 centimeter rise in the oceans, according to new data released this week by the Polar Portal, an organization umbrella of the Danish Arctic Institutes.

This volume of melted ice is particularly important on the coasts of the Danish autonomous territory, according to this study based on satellite observations from the Grace program.

“The data show that the majority of ice loss is occurring at the edges of the ice sheet, where independent observations show ice is shrinking, glacial fronts are receding into fjords and onshore, and melting is stronger on the surface of the ice », points out the Polar Portal. The west coast of Greenland is particularly affected, according to its data.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Global warming is destabilizing the poles more than ever

Acceleration of global warming

Global warming is particularly alarming in the Arctic, where it has occurred in recent decades at a rate three or even four times higher than the rest of the planet, according to the latest scientific studies.

According to a study published at the end of January by NASA, the accelerated melting near the coasts is explained by the warming of the waters of the Arctic Ocean, which contributes “at least as much as the air at the surface” to the decline of the Greenland ice cap.

The melting of the ice in Greenland is currently the main factor in the rise of the oceans on Earth and the glaciers of the territory are now retreating six to seven times faster than twenty-five years ago, according to the American agency.

According to climatologists, the Greenland ice cap contains a total of enough to raise the oceans by more than 7 meters, and Antarctica by almost 50 meters, even if the melting processes are very slow phenomena.

At the same time, the Arctic sea ice – the melting of which, on the other hand, has no effect on the level of the oceans – has also retreated considerably, losing on average almost 13% of its surface every ten years.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Climate: the last seven years are the hottest on record

The World with AFP

[date_timestamp] => 1643727753 ) [2] => Array ( [title] => “Coffee gets foamy” [link] => https://movs.world/planet/coffee-gets-foamy/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Sun, 30 Jan 2022 12:57:32 +0000 [category] => Planetcoffeefoamy [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/coffee-gets-foamy/ [description] => Harvesting coffee cherries, in Espera Feliz (Minas Gerais), Brazil, in November 2017. MAURO PIMENTEL / AFP Preturn his little black guy to the counter? This will once again be a reality in cafes from February 16. The date, set by the government, is part of the timetable for the gradual lifting of anti-Covid restrictions. And ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

Preturn his little black guy to the counter? This will once again be a reality in cafes from February 16. The date, set by the government, is part of the timetable for the gradual lifting of anti-Covid restrictions. And since telework and gauges will no longer be required since February 2, bistro owners are betting on a more impulsive climate. But what will be the price to pay for the lover of the timed coffee break?

The question deserves to be asked, as the black grain has been roasted by speculation. In particular, its most prized variety, Arabica. In early December 2021, its price soared on the New York Stock Exchange and reached the bar of 2.50 dollars (2.24 euros) per pound. A ten-year high. At the close of the markets, on December 31, its price was up 75% over one year.

Read also Covid-19: in bars and cafes, standing consumption prohibited from January 3 for three weeks

This blowback from investors coincided with the start of the harvest in Brazilian coffee fields. Even if the arabica collection was expected to be less overflowing than in 2020, given the two-year production rate of the trees, Mother Nature finally pressed the “ristretto” button. With the lack of water linked to an acute episode of drought, the coffee found itself thirsty. Production of black beans in Brazil, the world’s leading producer and exporter, has fallen by 24% compared to the record harvest of 2020, according to the National Supply Company (Conab).

“Freight Problems”

“The coffee market, like that of other tropical products, such as cotton, has also been disrupted by freight problems and the lack of containers, explains Philippe Chalmin, president of CyclOpe, a think tank on natural resource markets and professor at Paris-Dauphine University. However, if there is one certainty, it is that the logistics crisis will continue until the second half of the year, or even until 2023.

CyclOpe has lent itself to the perilous exercise of forecasting 2022. While its index, reflecting the evolution of the average annual prices of the main listed commodities, has made a spectacular jump of 49% in 2021, it should only increase by 4 % This year. Sign of a return to normal, after a period marked by the health crisis. But some raw materials should stand out. The black grain is one of them, just capped on the wire by the gas, with an expected increase of 20%. The coffee is foaming… “There were frosts in July in the Brazilian plantations. We are in the process of evaluating their impact on future productions., says Chalmin.

You have 14.65% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

) [summary] => Harvesting coffee cherries, in Espera Feliz (Minas Gerais), Brazil, in November 2017. MAURO PIMENTEL / AFP Preturn his little black guy to the counter? This will once again be a reality in cafes from February 16. The date, set by the government, is part of the timetable for the gradual lifting of anti-Covid restrictions. And ... Read more [atom_content] =>

Preturn his little black guy to the counter? This will once again be a reality in cafes from February 16. The date, set by the government, is part of the timetable for the gradual lifting of anti-Covid restrictions. And since telework and gauges will no longer be required since February 2, bistro owners are betting on a more impulsive climate. But what will be the price to pay for the lover of the timed coffee break?

The question deserves to be asked, as the black grain has been roasted by speculation. In particular, its most prized variety, Arabica. In early December 2021, its price soared on the New York Stock Exchange and reached the bar of 2.50 dollars (2.24 euros) per pound. A ten-year high. At the close of the markets, on December 31, its price was up 75% over one year.

Read also Covid-19: in bars and cafes, standing consumption prohibited from January 3 for three weeks

This blowback from investors coincided with the start of the harvest in Brazilian coffee fields. Even if the arabica collection was expected to be less overflowing than in 2020, given the two-year production rate of the trees, Mother Nature finally pressed the “ristretto” button. With the lack of water linked to an acute episode of drought, the coffee found itself thirsty. Production of black beans in Brazil, the world’s leading producer and exporter, has fallen by 24% compared to the record harvest of 2020, according to the National Supply Company (Conab).

“Freight Problems”

“The coffee market, like that of other tropical products, such as cotton, has also been disrupted by freight problems and the lack of containers, explains Philippe Chalmin, president of CyclOpe, a think tank on natural resource markets and professor at Paris-Dauphine University. However, if there is one certainty, it is that the logistics crisis will continue until the second half of the year, or even until 2023.

CyclOpe has lent itself to the perilous exercise of forecasting 2022. While its index, reflecting the evolution of the average annual prices of the main listed commodities, has made a spectacular jump of 49% in 2021, it should only increase by 4 % This year. Sign of a return to normal, after a period marked by the health crisis. But some raw materials should stand out. The black grain is one of them, just capped on the wire by the gas, with an expected increase of 20%. The coffee is foaming… “There were frosts in July in the Brazilian plantations. We are in the process of evaluating their impact on future productions., says Chalmin.

You have 14.65% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

[date_timestamp] => 1643547452 ) [3] => Array ( [title] => two discourses oppose each other in the face of the challenge of ecological transition [link] => https://movs.world/planet/two-discourses-oppose-each-other-in-the-face-of-the-challenge-of-ecological-transition/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Fri, 28 Jan 2022 10:52:37 +0000 [category] => Planetchallengediscoursesecologicalfaceopposetransition [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/two-discourses-oppose-each-other-in-the-face-of-the-challenge-of-ecological-transition/ [description] => Delphine Batho and Bruno Le Maire, at the “World” Economy Club, in Paris, on January 27, 2022. CAMILLE MILLERAND / DIVERGENCE FOR “THE WORLD” Is the energy transition compatible with economic growth? Yes, assures the Minister of the Economy Bruno Le Maire; no, opposes him the former minister and ecologist deputy Delphine Batho. Arguments crossed. ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

Is the energy transition compatible with economic growth? Yes, assures the Minister of the Economy Bruno Le Maire; no, opposes him the former minister and ecologist deputy Delphine Batho. Arguments crossed.

The observation

Delphine Batho: A native of Deux-Sèvres, I observe a revolting social situation in the country, an increase in poverty, pessimism, a social shock linked to what is happening on the field of energy. I directly link this shock to climate inaction. People pay cash the consequences of the lack of investment in the transformation of our model, in particular towards energy sobriety.

Bruno The Mayor: Let’s not mix everything. Poverty is first and foremost unemployment. The best way to respond to this is to create jobs. That’s what we did. The year 2021 has been particularly prosperous in this regard…

The project

D. B. : I assume the term degrowth. Since I was born in 1973, GDP has doubled while well-being is completely stable. GDP is an obsolete indicator. There is a path to economic success that is no longer that of growth in the volume of economic activity. It is through this social project that we will remobilize France, that we will give a new horizon to the Republic and that we will be reconciled with the future. We environmentalists want to be judged on improving people’s quality of life, another compass as a driver of public action and as a driver of public policy.

Also read the column: Article reserved for our subscribers “Degrowth is neither a program nor even a theory, but an aspiration”

B.L.M. : Sorry to be simplistic, but if you go in this direction, you will produce less wealth and you will have more poor people. Or else you will impoverish everyone, in the name of an egalitarian logic which is not mine. When I hear some environmentalists suggest reducing travel by 30%, I think that would lead to tremendous injustices, in the truest sense of the word. The poorest will no longer be able to travel, but certainly not the richest. This is not my conception of a modern democratic society. The first pillar of the society in which I believe is freedom; the second is the ability to invest; the third is support for the most modest households in this transition.

D.B. : To make things clear, I am not for an administered economy, I am for the ecological regulation of the market economy. All public policies and aid must be based on ecological criteria, otherwise we will continue to put money and invest in things that are sawing the branch on which we are sitting.

You have 60.61% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

) [summary] => Delphine Batho and Bruno Le Maire, at the “World” Economy Club, in Paris, on January 27, 2022. CAMILLE MILLERAND / DIVERGENCE FOR “THE WORLD” Is the energy transition compatible with economic growth? Yes, assures the Minister of the Economy Bruno Le Maire; no, opposes him the former minister and ecologist deputy Delphine Batho. Arguments crossed. ... Read more [atom_content] =>

Is the energy transition compatible with economic growth? Yes, assures the Minister of the Economy Bruno Le Maire; no, opposes him the former minister and ecologist deputy Delphine Batho. Arguments crossed.

The observation

Delphine Batho: A native of Deux-Sèvres, I observe a revolting social situation in the country, an increase in poverty, pessimism, a social shock linked to what is happening on the field of energy. I directly link this shock to climate inaction. People pay cash the consequences of the lack of investment in the transformation of our model, in particular towards energy sobriety.

Bruno The Mayor: Let’s not mix everything. Poverty is first and foremost unemployment. The best way to respond to this is to create jobs. That’s what we did. The year 2021 has been particularly prosperous in this regard…

The project

D. B. : I assume the term degrowth. Since I was born in 1973, GDP has doubled while well-being is completely stable. GDP is an obsolete indicator. There is a path to economic success that is no longer that of growth in the volume of economic activity. It is through this social project that we will remobilize France, that we will give a new horizon to the Republic and that we will be reconciled with the future. We environmentalists want to be judged on improving people’s quality of life, another compass as a driver of public action and as a driver of public policy.

Also read the column: Article reserved for our subscribers “Degrowth is neither a program nor even a theory, but an aspiration”

B.L.M. : Sorry to be simplistic, but if you go in this direction, you will produce less wealth and you will have more poor people. Or else you will impoverish everyone, in the name of an egalitarian logic which is not mine. When I hear some environmentalists suggest reducing travel by 30%, I think that would lead to tremendous injustices, in the truest sense of the word. The poorest will no longer be able to travel, but certainly not the richest. This is not my conception of a modern democratic society. The first pillar of the society in which I believe is freedom; the second is the ability to invest; the third is support for the most modest households in this transition.

D.B. : To make things clear, I am not for an administered economy, I am for the ecological regulation of the market economy. All public policies and aid must be based on ecological criteria, otherwise we will continue to put money and invest in things that are sawing the branch on which we are sitting.

You have 60.61% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

[date_timestamp] => 1643367157 ) [4] => Array ( [title] => after more than two months of closure, Morocco will reopen its airspace on February 7 [link] => https://movs.world/planet/after-more-than-two-months-of-closure-morocco-will-reopen-its-airspace-on-february-7/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Fri, 28 Jan 2022 00:51:33 +0000 [category] => PlanetAirspaceclosureFebruarymonthsMoroccoreopen [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/after-more-than-two-months-of-closure-morocco-will-reopen-its-airspace-on-february-7/ [description] => The government of Morocco has decided to reopen, as of February 7, the country’s airspace to flights departing from and arriving in the kingdom, according to a press release released Thursday evening, January 27, by the official agency MAP. Authorities were under pressure from a bankrupt tourism sector and Moroccans stranded abroad as borders were ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

The government of Morocco has decided to reopen, as of February 7, the country’s airspace to flights departing from and arriving in the kingdom, according to a press release released Thursday evening, January 27, by the official agency MAP.

Authorities were under pressure from a bankrupt tourism sector and Moroccans stranded abroad as borders were closed on November 29, 2021 due to an outbreak of the Omicron variant.

“This decision comes in accordance with the legal provisions relating to the management of the state of health emergency and following the recommendations of the scientific and technical commission and taking into account the evolution of the epidemiological situation in the kingdom”, says the government. “To support the implementation of this decision, a technical commission is currently examining the measures to be adopted at border posts and the conditions required for travelers, which will be announced later”, the statement said.

Read also Covid-19: in Morocco, the dashed hopes of a revival of tourism

The border closures have hit the tourism, hotel and catering industry hard, a vital sector for the kingdom’s economy. Despite the announcement of a support plan of 2 billion dirhams (190 million euros), operators in the sector demonstrated on Wednesday to demand the reopening of borders.

The closure of the airspace had also raised strong protests from the large Moroccan diaspora, especially since some private jet companies were operating connections to Morocco at exorbitant prices – more than 10,000 euros per passenger for a one way – according to news sites and testimonials on social media.

Vaccine factory

If the peak of contaminations with the Omicron variant seems to have been reached during the week of January 17 to 23, according to the Ministry of Health, the authorities are nevertheless worried about an increase in cases in intensive care. With its 36 million inhabitants, the Maghreb country relies on its vaccination campaign and the “national solidarity” to stem the epidemic: more than 23 million people received a second dose.

Read also In the midst of a pandemic, Morocco generalizes its social security coverage

The authorities’ objective is to immunize 80% of the population, or some 30 million people, with the Sinopharm and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines.

On Thursday, King Mohammed VI inaugurated the construction site of an anti-Covid-19 vaccine manufacturing plant, which should start production in July, in Benslimane, in the region of Casablanca, the economic capital.

King Mohammed VI at the inauguration of the construction of an anti-Covid-19 vaccine manufacturing plant, January 27, 2022, in Benslimane.

Named Sensyo Pharmatech, this plant will be dedicated to “the manufacture and syringe of vaccines [anti-Covid-19 et autres vaccins] » and will have “three industrial lines whose combined production capacity will reach 116 million units in 2024”, details the MAP agency. This company, in partnership with the Swedish company Recipharm, “will ensure the kingdom’s self-sufficiency in vaccines”, according to the agency.

Read also After Western Sahara, the Covid-19 triggers a new quarrel between Rabat and Madrid

The objective is to manufacture between 2022 and 2025 “the active substance of more than twenty vaccines and biotherapeutic products, including three vaccines against the coronavirus, covering more than 70% of the needs of the kingdom and more than 60% of those of Africa”, reports the agency.

Morocco has already started the production of doses of the Chinese vaccine Sinopharm (more than three million each month). This monthly production should reach five million doses from next month and more than twenty million by the end of 2022.

The World with AFP

) [summary] => The government of Morocco has decided to reopen, as of February 7, the country’s airspace to flights departing from and arriving in the kingdom, according to a press release released Thursday evening, January 27, by the official agency MAP. Authorities were under pressure from a bankrupt tourism sector and Moroccans stranded abroad as borders were ... Read more [atom_content] =>

The government of Morocco has decided to reopen, as of February 7, the country’s airspace to flights departing from and arriving in the kingdom, according to a press release released Thursday evening, January 27, by the official agency MAP.

Authorities were under pressure from a bankrupt tourism sector and Moroccans stranded abroad as borders were closed on November 29, 2021 due to an outbreak of the Omicron variant.

“This decision comes in accordance with the legal provisions relating to the management of the state of health emergency and following the recommendations of the scientific and technical commission and taking into account the evolution of the epidemiological situation in the kingdom”, says the government. “To support the implementation of this decision, a technical commission is currently examining the measures to be adopted at border posts and the conditions required for travelers, which will be announced later”, the statement said.

Read also Covid-19: in Morocco, the dashed hopes of a revival of tourism

The border closures have hit the tourism, hotel and catering industry hard, a vital sector for the kingdom’s economy. Despite the announcement of a support plan of 2 billion dirhams (190 million euros), operators in the sector demonstrated on Wednesday to demand the reopening of borders.

The closure of the airspace had also raised strong protests from the large Moroccan diaspora, especially since some private jet companies were operating connections to Morocco at exorbitant prices – more than 10,000 euros per passenger for a one way – according to news sites and testimonials on social media.

Vaccine factory

If the peak of contaminations with the Omicron variant seems to have been reached during the week of January 17 to 23, according to the Ministry of Health, the authorities are nevertheless worried about an increase in cases in intensive care. With its 36 million inhabitants, the Maghreb country relies on its vaccination campaign and the “national solidarity” to stem the epidemic: more than 23 million people received a second dose.

Read also In the midst of a pandemic, Morocco generalizes its social security coverage

The authorities’ objective is to immunize 80% of the population, or some 30 million people, with the Sinopharm and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines.

On Thursday, King Mohammed VI inaugurated the construction site of an anti-Covid-19 vaccine manufacturing plant, which should start production in July, in Benslimane, in the region of Casablanca, the economic capital.

King Mohammed VI at the inauguration of the construction of an anti-Covid-19 vaccine manufacturing plant, January 27, 2022, in Benslimane.

Named Sensyo Pharmatech, this plant will be dedicated to “the manufacture and syringe of vaccines [anti-Covid-19 et autres vaccins] » and will have “three industrial lines whose combined production capacity will reach 116 million units in 2024”, details the MAP agency. This company, in partnership with the Swedish company Recipharm, “will ensure the kingdom’s self-sufficiency in vaccines”, according to the agency.

Read also After Western Sahara, the Covid-19 triggers a new quarrel between Rabat and Madrid

The objective is to manufacture between 2022 and 2025 “the active substance of more than twenty vaccines and biotherapeutic products, including three vaccines against the coronavirus, covering more than 70% of the needs of the kingdom and more than 60% of those of Africa”, reports the agency.

Morocco has already started the production of doses of the Chinese vaccine Sinopharm (more than three million each month). This monthly production should reach five million doses from next month and more than twenty million by the end of 2022.

The World with AFP

[date_timestamp] => 1643331093 ) [5] => Array ( [title] => twelve days after the volcanic eruption, inhabitants of the Tonga islands testify [link] => https://movs.world/planet/twelve-days-after-the-volcanic-eruption-inhabitants-of-the-tonga-islands-testify/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Thu, 27 Jan 2022 14:50:27 +0000 [category] => PlanetdayseruptioninhabitantsIslandstestifyTongatwelvevolcanic [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/twelve-days-after-the-volcanic-eruption-inhabitants-of-the-tonga-islands-testify/ [description] => In total, according to the authorities, 85% of the population of this country of just over 100,000 people was affected by the volcanic eruption or the tsunami that followed. PETTY OFFICER CHRIS WEISSENBORN / AFP It is sometimes necessary to dial their number more than ten times before finally hearing their voices. Chopped. Deaf. Distant. ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

It is sometimes necessary to dial their number more than ten times before finally hearing their voices. Chopped. Deaf. Distant. On January 15, when the violent eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano caused a tsunami on the Tonga Islands, the submarine cable connecting the Polynesian archipelago to the rest of the world was damaged, instantly interrupting all telephone communications and Internet. After five days of almost total silence, the operator Digicel was able to partially restore its telephone network. Since then, connections have remained fragile and erratic, but they allow more and more Tongans to bear witness to the drama they have experienced.

All their stories begin with the terrifying sound of explosions. “There were several, growing louder and louder, to the point of leaving us half deaf, says Marian Kupu, journalist. We immediately understood that something serious was happening, that we had to run, take shelter. » Outside, rolls are already forming on the ocean, which suddenly changes its appearance. The young woman, who lives in a village on the seafront a few kilometers from the capital, Nuku’alofa, jumps into a car to get away from the coast as quickly as possible with her family. Like her, a whole country is moving inland in a gigantic traffic jam.

Polluted water, destroyed crops

“That’s when the sky turned black and it started to rain. Not water, but ashes, pebbles. It was apocalyptic. We couldn’t see anything through our windshield.” says in turn Tulutulu Mafuaiolotele, a former policeman. With his wife, his son, his cousins, nephews and nieces, he manages to find refuge with his in-laws. There, without electricity, without a telephone, he clings like a lifeline to the 90FM radio, which will never stop broadcasting. “This is the only information that reached us. Luckily they were there. They are the ones who immediately warned us of the risk of a tsunami. » At the seaside, not everyone had time to flee. Some had no choice but to climb trees to escape the waves that reached up to 15 meters high. Miraculously, there were only three deaths.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The Tonga islands still cut off from the world, three days after the volcanic eruption

“We didn’t immediately realize the extent of the damage. It wasn’t until two days later, when we finally decided to go home, that we realized. Everything was covered in a thick mantle of ash, even the animals. Above all, the landscape was upside down: there were electric poles on the ground, uprooted coconut trees, houses on the wrong side of the road. Since then, we spend our time cleaning up,” testifies again Marian Kupu, who, for more than twenty-four hours, remained caulked at her brother-in-law’s house, not daring to go out, terrified at the idea of ​​inhaling this gray rain which never stopped falling.

You have 49.71% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

) [summary] => In total, according to the authorities, 85% of the population of this country of just over 100,000 people was affected by the volcanic eruption or the tsunami that followed. PETTY OFFICER CHRIS WEISSENBORN / AFP It is sometimes necessary to dial their number more than ten times before finally hearing their voices. Chopped. Deaf. Distant. ... Read more [atom_content] =>

It is sometimes necessary to dial their number more than ten times before finally hearing their voices. Chopped. Deaf. Distant. On January 15, when the violent eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano caused a tsunami on the Tonga Islands, the submarine cable connecting the Polynesian archipelago to the rest of the world was damaged, instantly interrupting all telephone communications and Internet. After five days of almost total silence, the operator Digicel was able to partially restore its telephone network. Since then, connections have remained fragile and erratic, but they allow more and more Tongans to bear witness to the drama they have experienced.

All their stories begin with the terrifying sound of explosions. “There were several, growing louder and louder, to the point of leaving us half deaf, says Marian Kupu, journalist. We immediately understood that something serious was happening, that we had to run, take shelter. » Outside, rolls are already forming on the ocean, which suddenly changes its appearance. The young woman, who lives in a village on the seafront a few kilometers from the capital, Nuku’alofa, jumps into a car to get away from the coast as quickly as possible with her family. Like her, a whole country is moving inland in a gigantic traffic jam.

Polluted water, destroyed crops

“That’s when the sky turned black and it started to rain. Not water, but ashes, pebbles. It was apocalyptic. We couldn’t see anything through our windshield.” says in turn Tulutulu Mafuaiolotele, a former policeman. With his wife, his son, his cousins, nephews and nieces, he manages to find refuge with his in-laws. There, without electricity, without a telephone, he clings like a lifeline to the 90FM radio, which will never stop broadcasting. “This is the only information that reached us. Luckily they were there. They are the ones who immediately warned us of the risk of a tsunami. » At the seaside, not everyone had time to flee. Some had no choice but to climb trees to escape the waves that reached up to 15 meters high. Miraculously, there were only three deaths.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers The Tonga islands still cut off from the world, three days after the volcanic eruption

“We didn’t immediately realize the extent of the damage. It wasn’t until two days later, when we finally decided to go home, that we realized. Everything was covered in a thick mantle of ash, even the animals. Above all, the landscape was upside down: there were electric poles on the ground, uprooted coconut trees, houses on the wrong side of the road. Since then, we spend our time cleaning up,” testifies again Marian Kupu, who, for more than twenty-four hours, remained caulked at her brother-in-law’s house, not daring to go out, terrified at the idea of ​​inhaling this gray rain which never stopped falling.

You have 49.71% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

[date_timestamp] => 1643295027 ) [6] => Array ( [title] => “Epidemics can never be reduced to biological causes” [link] => https://movs.world/planet/epidemics-can-never-be-reduced-to-biological-causes/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Tue, 25 Jan 2022 02:44:59 +0000 [category] => Planetbiologicalepidemicsreduced [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/epidemics-can-never-be-reduced-to-biological-causes/ [description] => Lecturer in the history of medicine and health at the University of Strasbourg, Frédéric Vagneron is particularly interested in the history of influenza and that of the relationship between human health and animal health. His current work focuses on the history of European health, the management of deaths in times of pandemic and the role ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

Lecturer in the history of medicine and health at the University of Strasbourg, Frédéric Vagneron is particularly interested in the history of influenza and that of the relationship between human health and animal health. His current work focuses on the history of European health, the management of deaths in times of pandemic and the role of international regulations in the face of the slowdown in innovation on antibiotics. According to him, the Covid-19 pandemic marks a turning point compared to previous epidemics, even if parallels exist with the past, in terms of management or the feelings of the populations.

How does the Covid-19 pandemic differ from past major epidemics?

It is unique, first, by the abundance of data on the disease. We have access to almost instantaneous knowledge of its planetary evolution, for example with the tracking of variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. In this, this pandemic differs from the Spanish flu of 1918-1919, the memory of which has been invoked a lot for two years, for which knowledge remained incomplete over whole sections of territory. To this scientific knowledge is now added information – or misinformation – which circulates with unprecedented scale on social networks and in the media.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Back to the Spanish flu: “We thought we were done with the major epidemics. And boom, 240,000 dead”

Another singularity: this pandemic is developing in an unprecedented globalization of trade, which offers the virus a unique space and speed of proliferation. Echoing this ultra-rapid diffusion, solutions, in particular vaccines, were put in place with unprecedented speed, even though nothing was known about this disease in December 2019.

Is the appearance of a new disease a rare phenomenon?

What seems “rare” to me is that knowledge about this new disease was built up in an extremely short time. First from knowledge of the virus, its genetic identity card and its spread. Only then, without previous experience with patients, did the doctors draw up the clinical picture of this disease, observed through the very varied damage to the body. It’s a new timeline. Often, throughout history, we faced epidemics of long-known diseases (plague, rabies, smallpox, etc.), but the germ in question was identified much later. Here the process has been reversed. So much so that the disease was named after the identification of the virus. Even for HIV-AIDS, a not so old pandemic, this was not the case: it took several years to determine the viral cause of the disease, in 1983, after the first scattered cases observed in June 1981. Let’s imagine the history of this pandemic if scientists had not identified the virus before 2022! She would have been quite different.

You have 88.91% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

) [summary] => Lecturer in the history of medicine and health at the University of Strasbourg, Frédéric Vagneron is particularly interested in the history of influenza and that of the relationship between human health and animal health. His current work focuses on the history of European health, the management of deaths in times of pandemic and the role ... Read more [atom_content] =>

Lecturer in the history of medicine and health at the University of Strasbourg, Frédéric Vagneron is particularly interested in the history of influenza and that of the relationship between human health and animal health. His current work focuses on the history of European health, the management of deaths in times of pandemic and the role of international regulations in the face of the slowdown in innovation on antibiotics. According to him, the Covid-19 pandemic marks a turning point compared to previous epidemics, even if parallels exist with the past, in terms of management or the feelings of the populations.

How does the Covid-19 pandemic differ from past major epidemics?

It is unique, first, by the abundance of data on the disease. We have access to almost instantaneous knowledge of its planetary evolution, for example with the tracking of variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. In this, this pandemic differs from the Spanish flu of 1918-1919, the memory of which has been invoked a lot for two years, for which knowledge remained incomplete over whole sections of territory. To this scientific knowledge is now added information – or misinformation – which circulates with unprecedented scale on social networks and in the media.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Back to the Spanish flu: “We thought we were done with the major epidemics. And boom, 240,000 dead”

Another singularity: this pandemic is developing in an unprecedented globalization of trade, which offers the virus a unique space and speed of proliferation. Echoing this ultra-rapid diffusion, solutions, in particular vaccines, were put in place with unprecedented speed, even though nothing was known about this disease in December 2019.

Is the appearance of a new disease a rare phenomenon?

What seems “rare” to me is that knowledge about this new disease was built up in an extremely short time. First from knowledge of the virus, its genetic identity card and its spread. Only then, without previous experience with patients, did the doctors draw up the clinical picture of this disease, observed through the very varied damage to the body. It’s a new timeline. Often, throughout history, we faced epidemics of long-known diseases (plague, rabies, smallpox, etc.), but the germ in question was identified much later. Here the process has been reversed. So much so that the disease was named after the identification of the virus. Even for HIV-AIDS, a not so old pandemic, this was not the case: it took several years to determine the viral cause of the disease, in 1983, after the first scattered cases observed in June 1981. Let’s imagine the history of this pandemic if scientists had not identified the virus before 2022! She would have been quite different.

You have 88.91% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

[date_timestamp] => 1643078699 ) [7] => Array ( [title] => France’s energy independence thanks to nuclear power? A statistical sleight of hand and 100% import [link] => https://movs.world/planet/frances-energy-independence-thanks-to-nuclear-power-a-statistical-sleight-of-hand-and-100-import/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Mon, 24 Jan 2022 16:43:33 +0000 [category] => PlanetenergyFranceshandimportindependencenuclearpowersleightStatistical [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/frances-energy-independence-thanks-to-nuclear-power-a-statistical-sleight-of-hand-and-100-import/ [description] => The Arlit mine in Niger, here in 2005, operated by the French group Orano. PIERRE VERDY / AFP To provide France with a nuclear fleet to reduce its dependence on oil imports, after the oil crisis of 1973, such was the objective of President Valéry Giscard-d’Estaing when he launched a program in 1974 which would ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

To provide France with a nuclear fleet to reduce its dependence on oil imports, after the oil crisis of 1973, such was the objective of President Valéry Giscard-d’Estaing when he launched a program in 1974 which would lead to the construction of 45 nuclear power plants.

The nuclear power plants operated by EDF then produce electricity thanks to the heat emitted by the fission of uranium atoms; a material extracted, imported, enriched and then transformed into fuel by several companies that will be later merged under the name Areva. Energy independence is high, even if not total. French production of natural uranium is at its best, rising from 1,250 tonnes in 1970 to 2,634 tonnes in 1980.

Read also How nuclear is needed in the 2022 presidential campaign

Franco-French uranium mining stops

At the end of the 1990s, the nuclear program slowed down: France stopped building new power plants. In the aftermath, the Franco-French extraction of uranium declines, before stopping completely. Since the early 2000s, the uranium used for French nuclear power plants has been entirely imported, even if it is often then enriched in France, a detail that is important.

However, in its annual report, the Ministry of Ecological Transition states that France’s energy independence stands at 55.3% in 2020 and 53.4% ​​in the summer of 2021 according to provisional data. This means that more than half of the energy consumed in France is produced on French soil. But then how do we arrive at this rate, when nuclear represents 70% of the electricity produced, and 100% of the fuel is imported?

An old statistical convention

The answer lies in a “statistical convention” from the statistics manual co-published by the International Energy Agency and by Eurostat, which recommends “counting” as primary energy the heat emitted by the reactor rather than the fuel used to operate it. This convention is old, and goes back “at the time when uranium was produced in France”, explains Bernard Laponche, nuclear physicist and president of the Global Chance association. “We have since stopped producing it and the French mines have been closed. » The statistical convention remains.

Moreover, in the “Energy balance sheet of France”, the word “uranium” appears only twice in 189 pages, in explanatory notes and on the way of producing heat in a power station. In this balance sheet, “we have details on the price of coal, its origin or its calorific value, while we consume very little, laments Mr. Laponche, but we have nothing on uranium, which is nevertheless used to create the heat with which we produce electricity”. As this heat is produced on the hexagonal ground, the uranium is thus naturalized French.

Without this statistical convention, France could only achieve a 10 to 12% rate of energy independence, as the Ministry for Ecological Transition concedes in its energy report:

“In the case of France, which relies entirely on imported fuels (used directly or after recycling), the rate of energy independence would drop around 40 percentage points, to stand at around 12% in 2019, if the he primary energy was considered to be nuclear fuel rather than the heat resulting from its reaction. »

Uranium from Kazakhstan, Niger, Uzbekistan or Australia

Currently, to operate its 56 nuclear reactors, spread over 18 power plants, EDF needs 8,000 to 10,000 tonnes of natural uranium on average each year. Since there is no longer any French extraction of the ore, EDF’s uranium supply policy can be summed up as “not all eggs in one basket”, by seeking to multiply sources of supply.

Over the sixteen-year period between 2005 and 2020, nearly three-quarters of the 138,230 tons of natural uranium imported into France came from four countries:

  1. Kazakhstan: 27,748 tonnes (i.e. 20.1%);
  2. Australia: 25,804 (18.7%);
  3. Niger : 24 787 (17,9 %) ;
  4. Uzbekistan: 22,197 (16.1%).

These figures, obtained from the Euratom Technical Committee (CTE), nevertheless show more the activity of Orano (ex-Areva focused on the activities of the uranium cycle) in terms of natural uranium enrichment than the origin details of the fuel loaded in French power plants.

Indeed, even if EDF obtains fuel mainly from Orano, the company can also deal with the few other companies that enrich uranium; in Europe (Netherlands, United Kingdom, Germany) or elsewhere in the world such as Russia, Japan or the United States.

Once enriched, uranium intended for use in power plants changes nationality to that of the country where it was enriched. Contacted by The world, EDF gave no details on the precise origin of the fuel loaded in its power plants, simply stating that “EDF’s uranium supplies are ensured over the long term by diversified contracts in terms of origins and suppliers, lasting up to twenty years”.

The nuclear sector defends the “security of supplies”

On the side of the French nuclear industry, the general manager of Orano, Philippe Knoche, explains in an article Mining Annals than France “control your supply” in uranium, because the resource “is not concentrated in a single region of the world”, and so is not “subject to geopolitical hazards”. Orano currently produces uranium in Kazakhstan (45%), Canada (30%) and Niger (25%).

Mr. Knoche points out that “nearly 44% of uranium resources are located in OECD countries”, which would shield imports from geopolitical blackmail. It happens, however, that strategic contracts are called into question with these States, as shown by the recent example of the French submarines sold – then canceled – to Australia. Moreover, among France’s other major suppliers, Kazakhstan, Niger and Uzbekistan are not examples of political stability.

According to the director of Orano, the known resources of uranium could make it possible to continue to operate power stations until “mid-next century”, even for two hundred and fifty years, “if estimated resources are included” at the current level of use.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Why Emmanuel Macron is slow to clarify his nuclear promises

) [summary] => The Arlit mine in Niger, here in 2005, operated by the French group Orano. PIERRE VERDY / AFP To provide France with a nuclear fleet to reduce its dependence on oil imports, after the oil crisis of 1973, such was the objective of President Valéry Giscard-d’Estaing when he launched a program in 1974 which would ... Read more [atom_content] =>

To provide France with a nuclear fleet to reduce its dependence on oil imports, after the oil crisis of 1973, such was the objective of President Valéry Giscard-d’Estaing when he launched a program in 1974 which would lead to the construction of 45 nuclear power plants.

The nuclear power plants operated by EDF then produce electricity thanks to the heat emitted by the fission of uranium atoms; a material extracted, imported, enriched and then transformed into fuel by several companies that will be later merged under the name Areva. Energy independence is high, even if not total. French production of natural uranium is at its best, rising from 1,250 tonnes in 1970 to 2,634 tonnes in 1980.

Read also How nuclear is needed in the 2022 presidential campaign

Franco-French uranium mining stops

At the end of the 1990s, the nuclear program slowed down: France stopped building new power plants. In the aftermath, the Franco-French extraction of uranium declines, before stopping completely. Since the early 2000s, the uranium used for French nuclear power plants has been entirely imported, even if it is often then enriched in France, a detail that is important.

However, in its annual report, the Ministry of Ecological Transition states that France’s energy independence stands at 55.3% in 2020 and 53.4% ​​in the summer of 2021 according to provisional data. This means that more than half of the energy consumed in France is produced on French soil. But then how do we arrive at this rate, when nuclear represents 70% of the electricity produced, and 100% of the fuel is imported?

An old statistical convention

The answer lies in a “statistical convention” from the statistics manual co-published by the International Energy Agency and by Eurostat, which recommends “counting” as primary energy the heat emitted by the reactor rather than the fuel used to operate it. This convention is old, and goes back “at the time when uranium was produced in France”, explains Bernard Laponche, nuclear physicist and president of the Global Chance association. “We have since stopped producing it and the French mines have been closed. » The statistical convention remains.

Moreover, in the “Energy balance sheet of France”, the word “uranium” appears only twice in 189 pages, in explanatory notes and on the way of producing heat in a power station. In this balance sheet, “we have details on the price of coal, its origin or its calorific value, while we consume very little, laments Mr. Laponche, but we have nothing on uranium, which is nevertheless used to create the heat with which we produce electricity”. As this heat is produced on the hexagonal ground, the uranium is thus naturalized French.

Without this statistical convention, France could only achieve a 10 to 12% rate of energy independence, as the Ministry for Ecological Transition concedes in its energy report:

“In the case of France, which relies entirely on imported fuels (used directly or after recycling), the rate of energy independence would drop around 40 percentage points, to stand at around 12% in 2019, if the he primary energy was considered to be nuclear fuel rather than the heat resulting from its reaction. »

Uranium from Kazakhstan, Niger, Uzbekistan or Australia

Currently, to operate its 56 nuclear reactors, spread over 18 power plants, EDF needs 8,000 to 10,000 tonnes of natural uranium on average each year. Since there is no longer any French extraction of the ore, EDF’s uranium supply policy can be summed up as “not all eggs in one basket”, by seeking to multiply sources of supply.

Over the sixteen-year period between 2005 and 2020, nearly three-quarters of the 138,230 tons of natural uranium imported into France came from four countries:

  1. Kazakhstan: 27,748 tonnes (i.e. 20.1%);
  2. Australia: 25,804 (18.7%);
  3. Niger : 24 787 (17,9 %) ;
  4. Uzbekistan: 22,197 (16.1%).

These figures, obtained from the Euratom Technical Committee (CTE), nevertheless show more the activity of Orano (ex-Areva focused on the activities of the uranium cycle) in terms of natural uranium enrichment than the origin details of the fuel loaded in French power plants.

Indeed, even if EDF obtains fuel mainly from Orano, the company can also deal with the few other companies that enrich uranium; in Europe (Netherlands, United Kingdom, Germany) or elsewhere in the world such as Russia, Japan or the United States.

Once enriched, uranium intended for use in power plants changes nationality to that of the country where it was enriched. Contacted by The world, EDF gave no details on the precise origin of the fuel loaded in its power plants, simply stating that “EDF’s uranium supplies are ensured over the long term by diversified contracts in terms of origins and suppliers, lasting up to twenty years”.

The nuclear sector defends the “security of supplies”

On the side of the French nuclear industry, the general manager of Orano, Philippe Knoche, explains in an article Mining Annals than France “control your supply” in uranium, because the resource “is not concentrated in a single region of the world”, and so is not “subject to geopolitical hazards”. Orano currently produces uranium in Kazakhstan (45%), Canada (30%) and Niger (25%).

Mr. Knoche points out that “nearly 44% of uranium resources are located in OECD countries”, which would shield imports from geopolitical blackmail. It happens, however, that strategic contracts are called into question with these States, as shown by the recent example of the French submarines sold – then canceled – to Australia. Moreover, among France’s other major suppliers, Kazakhstan, Niger and Uzbekistan are not examples of political stability.

According to the director of Orano, the known resources of uranium could make it possible to continue to operate power stations until “mid-next century”, even for two hundred and fifty years, “if estimated resources are included” at the current level of use.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Why Emmanuel Macron is slow to clarify his nuclear promises

[date_timestamp] => 1643042613 ) [8] => Array ( [title] => the struggle of agricultural workers in Nicaragua taken to French justice [link] => https://movs.world/planet/the-struggle-of-agricultural-workers-in-nicaragua-taken-to-french-justice/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Mon, 24 Jan 2022 06:43:43 +0000 [category] => PlanetagriculturalFrenchjusticeNicaraguastruggleworkers [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/the-struggle-of-agricultural-workers-in-nicaragua-taken-to-french-justice/ [description] => Demonstration by agricultural workers against companies that have been exposed to harmful pesticides in banana plantations, in Managua, Nicaragua, in 2007. MIGUEL ALVAREZ / AFP It is an international, sprawling and unique case that finds itself before the French courts. A billion-dollar public health case. This is the amount of compensation claimed by 1,234 former ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

It is an international, sprawling and unique case that finds itself before the French courts. A billion-dollar public health case. This is the amount of compensation claimed by 1,234 former Nicaraguan farm workers from three American agrochemical multinationals. Until 1983, The Dow Chemical Company, Occidental Chemical (now Oxy) and Shell Oil exported DBCP (Dibromo-chloropropane) to Central America, which was banned in the United States in 1977. This extremely polluting pesticide, which causes cancer and infertility in particular, was used without protection by the plaintiffs to eliminate worms harmful to the roots of banana trees. Monday, January 24, the magistrates of the Paris court will examine the request for summons from the three American groups within the framework of the procedure ofexequatur launched by the victims’ lawyers.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Pesticides: Nicaraguans turn to France to enforce a judgment

This aims to make enforceable in France, and in the other States of the European Union, a Nicaraguan court decision which condemned the American companies to pay 805 million dollars in compensation to these former workers. This judgment, pronounced in 2006, recognizes the responsibility of American groups in the import, distribution and use of DBCP on farms between 1977 and 1983. This was upheld on appeal and, in 2012, by the Supreme Court of Nicaragua. However, this judicial decision could never be executed. Dow Chemical Company, Occidental Chemical and Shell Oil are strongly contesting it and have withdrawn from the country without leaving any seizable assets behind.

Suspicions on the file

Attracted by this case as by a treasure, American lawyers – for some villainous – rushed to Chinandega in Nicaragua to identify more and more alleged victims of the DBCP. And this, in order to bring the case before the American justice. It has been shown that certain health data have been doctored by these lawyers, that alleged victims of infertility have had children. At the same time, the American giants in question have never ceased to use their financial and legal power and their influence through lobbying and investigation firms to discredit the justice of Nicaragua, the plaintiffs and their advice.

In 2010, Californian judge Victoria Chaney overturned a ruling in favor of six Nicaraguan farmworkers. This magistrate reputed to be close to the Republican Party then points to a “conspiracy” and concludes to a fraud made possible by “Nicaragua’s peculiar and bizarre social ecosystem”. This judgment dashed the hopes of justice and compensation for Nicaraguan victims. At least in the United States where the three multinationals have their headquarters: in New York for Oxy, in the State of Delaware – considered a small “Tax haven” – pour Shell Oil et Dow Chemical Company.

You have 45.11% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

) [summary] => Demonstration by agricultural workers against companies that have been exposed to harmful pesticides in banana plantations, in Managua, Nicaragua, in 2007. MIGUEL ALVAREZ / AFP It is an international, sprawling and unique case that finds itself before the French courts. A billion-dollar public health case. This is the amount of compensation claimed by 1,234 former ... Read more [atom_content] =>

It is an international, sprawling and unique case that finds itself before the French courts. A billion-dollar public health case. This is the amount of compensation claimed by 1,234 former Nicaraguan farm workers from three American agrochemical multinationals. Until 1983, The Dow Chemical Company, Occidental Chemical (now Oxy) and Shell Oil exported DBCP (Dibromo-chloropropane) to Central America, which was banned in the United States in 1977. This extremely polluting pesticide, which causes cancer and infertility in particular, was used without protection by the plaintiffs to eliminate worms harmful to the roots of banana trees. Monday, January 24, the magistrates of the Paris court will examine the request for summons from the three American groups within the framework of the procedure ofexequatur launched by the victims’ lawyers.

Read also Article reserved for our subscribers Pesticides: Nicaraguans turn to France to enforce a judgment

This aims to make enforceable in France, and in the other States of the European Union, a Nicaraguan court decision which condemned the American companies to pay 805 million dollars in compensation to these former workers. This judgment, pronounced in 2006, recognizes the responsibility of American groups in the import, distribution and use of DBCP on farms between 1977 and 1983. This was upheld on appeal and, in 2012, by the Supreme Court of Nicaragua. However, this judicial decision could never be executed. Dow Chemical Company, Occidental Chemical and Shell Oil are strongly contesting it and have withdrawn from the country without leaving any seizable assets behind.

Suspicions on the file

Attracted by this case as by a treasure, American lawyers – for some villainous – rushed to Chinandega in Nicaragua to identify more and more alleged victims of the DBCP. And this, in order to bring the case before the American justice. It has been shown that certain health data have been doctored by these lawyers, that alleged victims of infertility have had children. At the same time, the American giants in question have never ceased to use their financial and legal power and their influence through lobbying and investigation firms to discredit the justice of Nicaragua, the plaintiffs and their advice.

In 2010, Californian judge Victoria Chaney overturned a ruling in favor of six Nicaraguan farmworkers. This magistrate reputed to be close to the Republican Party then points to a “conspiracy” and concludes to a fraud made possible by “Nicaragua’s peculiar and bizarre social ecosystem”. This judgment dashed the hopes of justice and compensation for Nicaraguan victims. At least in the United States where the three multinationals have their headquarters: in New York for Oxy, in the State of Delaware – considered a small “Tax haven” – pour Shell Oil et Dow Chemical Company.

You have 45.11% of this article left to read. The following is for subscribers only.

[date_timestamp] => 1643006623 ) [9] => Array ( [title] => clashes between demonstrators and police in Brussels [link] => https://movs.world/planet/clashes-between-demonstrators-and-police-in-brussels/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Susan Hally ) [pubdate] => Sun, 23 Jan 2022 20:41:52 +0000 [category] => PlanetBrusselsclashesdemonstratorspolice [guid] => https://movs.world/planet/clashes-between-demonstrators-and-police-in-brussels/ [description] => During the demonstration against health restrictions, in Brussels, on January 23, 2022. GEERT VANDEN WIJNGAERT / AP Clashes opposed the police and people hostile to the restrictions linked to the Covid-19 pandemic, during a demonstration which brought together tens of thousands of people, in Brussels, on Sunday January 23. According to the authorities, around 50,000 ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

Clashes opposed the police and people hostile to the restrictions linked to the Covid-19 pandemic, during a demonstration which brought together tens of thousands of people, in Brussels, on Sunday January 23.

According to the authorities, around 50,000 people marched in the Belgian capital, some from other European countries. This is the largest in a series of protests in the city over the past few months.

Clashes erupted near European Union headquarters as police used water cannons and tear gas to push back protesters who were throwing cobblestones and firecrackers. According to RTL radio, masked protesters smashed a window at the entrance to the EU foreign affairs headquarters.

The participants in this parade, more crowded than previous processions, carried placards criticizing the Belgian Prime Minister, Alexander De Croo, as well as the sanitary pass.

Demonstrations against the health certificate – required to access restaurants and cultural events in particular – have been taking place regularly for several weeks in the Belgian capital. Some of the previous rallies had already been marked by clashes with the police.

Protesters from several countries

A demonstration against health restrictions, in Brussels, on January 23, 2022.

Organizers, including the World Wide Demonstration for Freedom and Europeans United for Freedom movements, had invited protesters from other European countries to participate on Sunday. Dutch, Polish, French and Romanian flags were visible in the procession.

The protest comes as some governments move towards reducing health restrictions, despite the persistence of the Omicron variant. The latter is now dominant in the European Union, announced the European Health Agency on Friday.

Belgium has seen a jump in daily cases above 60,000 in the past week, with authorities citing a « tsunami ». But the less deleterious effects of the Omicron variant and a high rate of vaccination have allowed the health system to be less under pressure than during previous waves. In this context, the Prime Minister announced on Friday that restaurants and bars could extend their opening hours. Nightclubs will remain closed.

In France, the government announced Thursday evening the lifting, in February, of most of the restrictions taken to curb the epidemic: end of wearing a mask outdoors and compulsory teleworking, reopening of nightclubs and return of standing concerts.

Read also: The timetable for lifting restrictions revealed

The World with AFP

) [summary] => During the demonstration against health restrictions, in Brussels, on January 23, 2022. GEERT VANDEN WIJNGAERT / AP Clashes opposed the police and people hostile to the restrictions linked to the Covid-19 pandemic, during a demonstration which brought together tens of thousands of people, in Brussels, on Sunday January 23. According to the authorities, around 50,000 ... Read more [atom_content] =>

Clashes opposed the police and people hostile to the restrictions linked to the Covid-19 pandemic, during a demonstration which brought together tens of thousands of people, in Brussels, on Sunday January 23.

According to the authorities, around 50,000 people marched in the Belgian capital, some from other European countries. This is the largest in a series of protests in the city over the past few months.

Clashes erupted near European Union headquarters as police used water cannons and tear gas to push back protesters who were throwing cobblestones and firecrackers. According to RTL radio, masked protesters smashed a window at the entrance to the EU foreign affairs headquarters.

The participants in this parade, more crowded than previous processions, carried placards criticizing the Belgian Prime Minister, Alexander De Croo, as well as the sanitary pass.

Demonstrations against the health certificate – required to access restaurants and cultural events in particular – have been taking place regularly for several weeks in the Belgian capital. Some of the previous rallies had already been marked by clashes with the police.

Protesters from several countries

A demonstration against health restrictions, in Brussels, on January 23, 2022.

Organizers, including the World Wide Demonstration for Freedom and Europeans United for Freedom movements, had invited protesters from other European countries to participate on Sunday. Dutch, Polish, French and Romanian flags were visible in the procession.

The protest comes as some governments move towards reducing health restrictions, despite the persistence of the Omicron variant. The latter is now dominant in the European Union, announced the European Health Agency on Friday.

Belgium has seen a jump in daily cases above 60,000 in the past week, with authorities citing a « tsunami ». But the less deleterious effects of the Omicron variant and a high rate of vaccination have allowed the health system to be less under pressure than during previous waves. In this context, the Prime Minister announced on Friday that restaurants and bars could extend their opening hours. Nightclubs will remain closed.

In France, the government announced Thursday evening the lifting, in February, of most of the restrictions taken to curb the epidemic: end of wearing a mask outdoors and compulsory teleworking, reopening of nightclubs and return of standing concerts.

Read also: The timetable for lifting restrictions revealed

The World with AFP

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