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20.10.2011., četvrtak

SURROUNDINGS FLOWERS NEW YORK - SURROUNDINGS FLOWERS


Surroundings flowers new york - Ruby red enamel ring with vintage cz flower design - Popular flowers for valentines day



Surroundings Flowers New York





surroundings flowers new york






    surroundings
  • The things and conditions around a person or thing

  • milieu: the environmental condition

  • environment: the area in which something exists or lives; "the country--the flat agricultural surround"

  • In science and engineering, a system is the part of the universe that is being studied, while the environment is the remainder of the universe that lies outside the boundaries of the system. It is also known as the surroundings, and in thermodynamics, as the reservoir.





    new york
  • A state in the northeastern US, on the Canadian border and Lake Ontario in the northwest, as well as on the Atlantic coast in the southeast; pop. 18,976,457; capital, Albany; statehood, July 26, 1788 (11). Originally settled by the Dutch, it was surrendered to the British in 1664. New York was one of the original thirteen states

  • A major city and port in southeastern New York, situated on the Atlantic coast at the mouth of the Hudson River; pop. 7,322,564. It is situated mainly on islands, linked by bridges, and consists of five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island. Manhattan is the economic and cultural heart of the city, containing the stock exchange on Wall Street and the headquarters of the United Nations

  • the largest city in New York State and in the United States; located in southeastern New York at the mouth of the Hudson river; a major financial and cultural center

  • a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies

  • one of the British colonies that formed the United States





    flowers
  • (of a plant) Produce flowers; bloom

  • (flower) bloom: produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed"

  • (flower) a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms

  • (flower) reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts

  • Induce (a plant) to produce flowers

  • Be in or reach an optimum stage of development; develop fully and richly











surroundings flowers new york - Barrier Breakers:




Barrier Breakers: Ignite Your Faith, Stir Your Spirit, Destroy the Works of the Devil Surrounding Your Life


Barrier Breakers: Ignite Your Faith, Stir Your Spirit, Destroy the Works of the Devil Surrounding Your Life



You were born to succeed! Discover what is holding you back from moving forward in life into a joyful world of “more than enough.”

Developing a breakthrough spirit is the key to overcoming all the barriers placed in front of you by financial troubles, physical limitations, family problems, emotional stress, career concerns—and yourself!

These things I [Jesus] have spoken to you, that in Me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation; but be of good cheer, I have overcome the world (John 16:33 NKJV).

Barrier Breaker is an action phrase, meaning you can do something to improve your life and circumstances. The Living God is dwelling inside you—you possess the same Spirit that heals the sick, brings power to the weak, and knows peace indescribable.

You will learn how to:
See yourself as God sees you—a champion!
How to recognize and destroy the works of the devil.
Embrace power and supernatural ability through Jesus.
Ignite your faith, stir your spirit, and take your place as a Barrier Breaker!

Choose to be a Barrier Breaker—and you choose to enter into God’s supernatural destiny designed uniquely for you.










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New York Botanical Garden Library Building, Fountain of Life, and Tulip Tree Allee




New York Botanical Garden Library Building, Fountain of Life, and Tulip Tree Allee





New York Botanical Garden, Fordham, The Bronx, New York City, New York, United States

The grand neo-Renaissance style New York Botanical Garden Museum Building, along with the Fountain of Life and Tulip Tree Allee, form a distinguished and monumental Beaux-Arts civic space within the largest and most renowned botanical garden in the country. Founded in 1891 and located within Bronx Park, the Botanical Garden showcases one of the world’s great collections of plants and serves as an educational center for gardening and horticulture.

The Museum (now Library) Building, designed in 1896 by architect Robert W. Gibson and constructed in 1898-1901, originally housed the Garden’s preserved botanical specimens and was the first American museum devoted solely to botany. The long four-story structure, clad in greyish-buff brick and buff terra cotta, features a symmetrical design and classically-inspired ornament characteristic of Beaux-Arts civic buildings at the turn of the century, with a rusticated and pedimented central pavilion with monumental columns and copper-clad saucer dome, flanked by sections and end pavilions with monumental pilasters. The energetic bronze sculptural group of the Fountain of Life (1903-05), designed by Carl (Charles) E. Tefft for Gibson’s marble plinth and basins, depicts a cherub astride a dolphin atop a globe and two web-footed plunging horses being restrained by a female and a boy, surprising a merman and mermaid in the basin below. The fountain was restored in 2005. The Tulip Tree Allee, consisting of trees lining both sides of the drives leading to the fountain, was planted in 1903-11 at the direction of Nathaniel Lord Britton, first director of the Garden.
New York Botanical Garden in Bronx Park

As early as 1888, the Torrey Botanical Club, the largest such American society, took on the mission of establishing a great botanical garden for New York City. The club was reportedly inspired by the description of Elizabeth Gertrude Knight Britton, and her husband, Nathaniel Lord Britton, both academics and botanists, of a recent visit to the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, England. A committee of the club, and the Brittons, in particular, promoted the idea, gaining the support of newspapers and influential New Yorkers. By the following year, club members had selected Bronx Park in the Bronx as a favorable location; the park land had been acquired by New York City in 1884 in anticipation of Consolidation. This was part of the vast former land holdings (beginning in 1792 until 1870) of the Lorillard family of tobacco fortune fame. According to the censuses of 1800 and 1810, Peter Lorillard owned one slave. It is unknown whether or not slaves were used in their Bronx operations, but tobacco production in the South would have been based on slave labor.

After an act was drawn up by Addison Brown and Charles Daly, two federal judges with botanical/horticultural interests, the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) was established by the New York State Legislature in 1891 (with an amendment in 1894) for

the purpose of establishing and maintaining a botanical garden and museum and arboretum therein, for the collection and culture of plants, flowers, shrubs and trees, the advancement of botanical science and knowledge and the prosecution of original researches therein and in kindred subjects, for affording instruction in the same, for the prosecution and exhibition of ornamental and decorative horticulture and gardening, and for the entertainment, recreation and instruction of the people.

NYBG was to be managed by a Board of Directors, consisting of the president of Columbia College, and its professors of botany, geology, and chemistry; the president of the Torrey Botanical Club; the president of the New York City Board of Education; the mayor; and the president of the Board of Commissioners of the Dept. of Public Parks; along with nine elected members. The legislation stipulated that when sufficient funds (not less than $250,000) were raised within five years of its passage, the Board was authorized to appropriate a portion of Bronx Park, not to exceed 250 acres, as well as to construct “a suitable fireproof building for such botanical museum and herbarium, with lecture rooms and laboratories for instruction”4 and other necessary structures. The City was then to issue bonds for $500,000.

In June 1895, it was announced that the $250,000 goal had been met, with major contributions from such titans as Andrew Carnegie, J.P. Morgan, J.D. Rockefeller, and Cornelius Vanderbilt II (president of the Board). At that time it was noted that “the scientific Directors have appointed a committee to confer with the experts of the Park Board in regard to the location to be chosen for the garden in Bronx Park.”5 The Board of Directors thus referred the question of site selection to Calvert Vaux, one of the city’s most eminent landscape architects since his first collaboration with Frederick Law Olmsted in Cent











Fountain of Life and New York Botanical Garden Library Building




Fountain of Life and New York Botanical Garden Library Building





New York Botanical Garden, Fordham, Bronx, New York City, New York, United States

The grand neo-Renaissance style New York Botanical Garden Museum Building, along with the Fountain of Life and Tulip Tree Allee, form a distinguished and monumental Beaux-Arts civic space within the largest and most renowned botanical garden in the country. Founded in 1891 and located within Bronx Park, the Botanical Garden showcases one of the world’s great collections of plants and serves as an educational center for gardening and horticulture.

The Museum (now Library) Building, designed in 1896 by architect Robert W. Gibson and constructed in 1898-1901, originally housed the Garden’s preserved botanical specimens and was the first American museum devoted solely to botany. The long four-story structure, clad in greyish-buff brick and buff terra cotta, features a symmetrical design and classically-inspired ornament characteristic of Beaux-Arts civic buildings at the turn of the century, with a rusticated and pedimented central pavilion with monumental columns and copper-clad saucer dome, flanked by sections and end pavilions with monumental pilasters. The energetic bronze sculptural group of the Fountain of Life (1903-05), designed by Carl (Charles) E. Tefft for Gibson’s marble plinth and basins, depicts a cherub astride a dolphin atop a globe and two web-footed plunging horses being restrained by a female and a boy, surprising a merman and mermaid in the basin below. The fountain was restored in 2005. The Tulip Tree Allee, consisting of trees lining both sides of the drives leading to the fountain, was planted in 1903-11 at the direction of Nathaniel Lord Britton, first director of the Garden.
New York Botanical Garden in Bronx Park

As early as 1888, the Torrey Botanical Club, the largest such American society, took on the mission of establishing a great botanical garden for New York City. The club was reportedly inspired by the description of Elizabeth Gertrude Knight Britton, and her husband, Nathaniel Lord Britton, both academics and botanists, of a recent visit to the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, England. A committee of the club, and the Brittons, in particular, promoted the idea, gaining the support of newspapers and influential New Yorkers. By the following year, club members had selected Bronx Park in the Bronx as a favorable location; the park land had been acquired by New York City in 1884 in anticipation of Consolidation. This was part of the vast former land holdings (beginning in 1792 until 1870) of the Lorillard family of tobacco fortune fame. According to the censuses of 1800 and 1810, Peter Lorillard owned one slave. It is unknown whether or not slaves were used in their Bronx operations, but tobacco production in the South would have been based on slave labor.

After an act was drawn up by Addison Brown and Charles Daly, two federal judges with botanical/horticultural interests, the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) was established by the New York State Legislature in 1891 (with an amendment in 1894) for

the purpose of establishing and maintaining a botanical garden and museum and arboretum therein, for the collection and culture of plants, flowers, shrubs and trees, the advancement of botanical science and knowledge and the prosecution of original researches therein and in kindred subjects, for affording instruction in the same, for the prosecution and exhibition of ornamental and decorative horticulture and gardening, and for the entertainment, recreation and instruction of the people.

NYBG was to be managed by a Board of Directors, consisting of the president of Columbia College, and its professors of botany, geology, and chemistry; the president of the Torrey Botanical Club; the president of the New York City Board of Education; the mayor; and the president of the Board of Commissioners of the Dept. of Public Parks; along with nine elected members. The legislation stipulated that when sufficient funds (not less than $250,000) were raised within five years of its passage, the Board was authorized to appropriate a portion of Bronx Park, not to exceed 250 acres, as well as to construct “a suitable fireproof building for such botanical museum and herbarium, with lecture rooms and laboratories for instruction”4 and other necessary structures. The City was then to issue bonds for $500,000.

In June 1895, it was announced that the $250,000 goal had been met, with major contributions from such titans as Andrew Carnegie, J.P. Morgan, J.D. Rockefeller, and Cornelius Vanderbilt II (president of the Board). At that time it was noted that “the scientific Directors have appointed a committee to confer with the experts of the Park Board in regard to the location to be chosen for the garden in Bronx Park.”5 The Board of Directors thus referred the question of site selection to Calvert Vaux, one of the city’s most eminent landscape architects since his first collaboration with Frederick Law Olmsted in Central









surroundings flowers new york








surroundings flowers new york




The Power of Place: How Our Surroundings Shape Our Thoughts, Emotions, and Actions (P.S.)






Are New Yorkers and Californians so different because they live in such different settings? Why do some of us prefer the city to the country? How do urban settings increase crime? Why do we feel better after an experience in nature?
In this fascinating and enormously entertaining book, Winifred Gallagher explores the complex relationships between people and the places in which they live, love, and work. Drawing on the latest research on behavioral and environmental science, THE POWER OF PLACE examines our reactions to light, temperatiure, the seasons, and other natural phenomena, and explores the interactions between our external and internal worlds.
Gallagher's broad and dynamic definition of place includes mountaintops and the womb, Alaska's hinterlands and Manhattan's subways, and she relates these settings to everything from creativity to PMS, jet lag to tales of UFOs.
Full of complex information made totally accessible, THE POWER OF PLACE offers the latest insights into the many ways we can change our lives by changing the places we live.

There are reasons why most humans love the mountains and why the great outdoors can do so much to soothe the urban jitters. Winifred Gallagher explains the inner workings of environmental psychology in The Power of Place. Traveling from northernmost Alaska, where the need to stay indoors for so much of the year takes a heavy mental and physical toll on the locals, to the artificial canyons of Manhattan, Gallagher strips off one civilizing layer after another to reveal the human animal within us, the creature that requires open spaces and clear air to function as it should. If you ever wondered why mountaineers take the risks they do or why Michael Jackson spent all that money on a hyperbaric chamber, Gallagher has the answer.










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