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ELECTRIC MOTOR REPAIR PARTS. REPAIR PARTS


Electric Motor Repair Parts. Scion Xd Repair Manual. Television Repair Store.



Electric Motor Repair Parts





electric motor repair parts






    electric motor
  • A device which changes electrical energy into rotational motion. In addition to the starter and windshield wiper motors, which were the first electric motors to be added to the automotive electrical system, modern cars include a large number of small motors for driving such items as the electric

  • An electric motor uses electrical energy to produce mechanical energy, very typically through the interaction of magnetic fields and current-carrying conductors. The reverse process, producing electrical energy from mechanical energy, is accomplished by an alternator, generator or dynamo.

  • a motor that converts electricity to mechanical work





    repair
  • the act of putting something in working order again

  • Put right (a damaged relationship or unwelcome situation)

  • Fix or mend (a thing suffering from damage or a fault)

  • Make good (such damage) by fixing or repairing it

  • restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken; "She repaired her TV set"; "Repair my shoes please"

  • a formal way of referring to the condition of something; "the building was in good repair"





    parts
  • the local environment; "he hasn't been seen around these parts in years"

  • (part) something determined in relation to something that includes it; "he wanted to feel a part of something bigger than himself"; "I read a portion of the manuscript"; "the smaller component is hard to reach"; "the animal constituent of plankton"

  • (of two things) Move away from each other

  • Divide to leave a central space

  • Cause to divide or move apart, leaving a central space

  • (part) separate: go one's own way; move apart; "The friends separated after the party"











Bristol Commercial Vehicles Ltd




Bristol Commercial Vehicles Ltd





Bristol Commercial Vehicles Ltd - The history of the company responsible for building the Bristol chassis goes back over a century to 1874. It was in that year a group of citizens formed the Bristol Tramways Company to operate a horse drawn tram service on track that was already being laid by the Bristol City Corporation.

The system opened to the public in August 1875 and was an immediate success, leading to extensions over the next few years. The trains were augmented with a cab service in 1886 with the formation of the Bristol Cab Company and the two companies merged the following year to form The Bristol Tramways & Carriage Company Ltd., a name that was to survive until 1957.

Horse buses were introduced to provide feeder services to the trains and the company became one of the pioneers of electric traction, with the first cars running in 1895. The whole system was electrified by 1900 and seven depots housed the trains.

The trains were augmented with a cab service in 1886 with the formation of the Bristol Cab Company and the two companies merged the following year to form The Bristol Tramways & Carriage Company Ltd., a name that was to survive until 1957.

Motor buses were also introduced at an early date with several Thornycrofts entering service in 1906, a depot and repair works being built at Filton on the out-skirts of the city to house the omnibuses.

Motor taxis appeared in 1908 and over 300 taxis and hire cars were purchased by the company in the next six years. A fleet of motor lorries available on hire or long term contract was also built up with over four dozen vehicles being purchased in 1912, making the company the largest motor and horse vehicle operator in the West of England.

The Brislington depot incorporated facilities for major mechanical and body repairs and, together with other bodyworks at Leek Lane in the city, was responsible for building many of the bodies on the new motor vehicles.

The enterprise shown by the company since its formation made it perhaps inevitable that an attempt would be made to build their own chassis, especially as the ones purchased initially were not trouble free.

The Brislington depot was to play an important part in the future manufacture of Bristol vehicles. Motor buses were also introduced at an early date with several Thornycrofts entering service in 1906, a depot and repair works being built at Filton on the out-skirts of the city to house the omnibuses.

The first Bristol chassis was produced at the Filton depot in 1908 and bore no makerís name on the radiator but had a notable resemblance to the Thornycrofts then being operated.

With the Bristol chassis now in production the company Chairman, Mr. George White, began to look for other ventures to satisfy his progressive nature and turned his attention to the new-fangled flying machine. He was instrumental in the formation of the British and Colonial Aeroplane Company in 1910 and was most adamant that chassis production should be moved as soon as possible from the Filton depot so that he could start building aircraft there.

This was achieved in 1912 when the bus company moved to new premises and the two iron sheds of the Filton depot developed into the large works and airfield of today.

The new works were at Brislington, just up the road from the tram depot, and became known as The Motor Constructional Works (M.C.W.).

The year 1929 marked the first connection of the Bristol firm with another when The Great Western Railway Company acquired a financial interest. In 1932 this was transferred to the Western National Omnibus Company Ltd., a subsidiary of the Thomas Tilling Group, who had a controlling interest.

Shortage of space at M.C.W. led to the purchase of additional works at Chatsworth Road in 1935. These works were situated to the city side of Brislington depot and the final assembly of chassis was moved there.

In 1943 a private company was formed with the object of eventually separating the manufacturing side of the company from its bus fleet operations. This company was Bristol Commercial Vehicles Ltd. (B.C.V.) but its formation was to have no immediate effect.

With the passing of the 1947 Transport Act and the resulting nationalisation, control of the company passed to the British Transport Commission and the sale of Bristol chassis was now limited to undertakings controlled by them. Bristol Commercial Vehicles finally became a working company in 1955 although it was still controlled by the British Transport Commission.

On October 1st 1965, The Leyland Motor Corporation acquired a 25 interest in B.C.V. and the Bristol chassis again became available on the open market. Leyland gained total control in 1983 and the Bristol works were closed within a year, adding another name to the list of ceased British chassis manufacturers. Bristol Commercial Vehicles in Bath Road Brislington had been building buses since 1912 later to be taken over by British Leyland - its customer bas











Bristol Commercial Vehicles Ltd BS4




Bristol Commercial Vehicles Ltd BS4





Flashback: B.C.V.'s Works in 1918

Bristol Commercial Vehicles Ltd. The Company History

The history of the company responsible for building the Bristol chassis goes back over a century to 1874. It was in that year a group of citizens formed the Bristol Tramways Company to operate a horse drawn tram service on track that was already being laid by the Bristol City Corporation. The system opened to the public in August 1875 and was an immediate success, leading to extensions over the next few years.

The trains were augmented with a cab service in 1886 with the formation of the Bristol Cab Company and the two companies merged the following year to form The Bristol Tramways & Carriage Company Ltd., a name that was to survive until 1957.

Horse buses were introduced to provide feeder services to the trains and the company became one of the pioneers of electric traction, with the first cars running in 1895. The whole system was electrified by 1900 and seven depots housed the trains. The Brislington depot was to play an important part in the future manufacture of Bristol vehicles.

Motor buses were also introduced at an early date with several Thornycrofts entering service in 1906, a depot and repair works being built at Filton on the out-skirts of the city to house the omnibuses.

Motor taxis appeared in 1908 and over 300 taxis and hire cars were purchased by the company in the next six years. A fleet of motor lorries available on hire or long term contract was also built up with over four dozen vehicles being purchased in 1912, making the company the largest motor and horse vehicle operator in the West of England.

The Brislington depot incorporated facilities for major mechanical and body repairs and, together with other bodyworks at Leek Lane in the city, was responsible for building many of the bodies on the new motor vehicles.

The enterprise shown by the company since its formation made it perhaps inevitable that an attempt would be made to build their own chassis, especially as the ones purchased initially were not trouble free.

The first Bristol chassis was produced at the Filton depot in 1908 and bore no makerís name on the radiator but had a notable resemblance to the Thornycrofts then being operated.

With the Bristol chassis now in production the company Chairman, Mr. George White, began to look for other ventures to satisfy his progressive nature and turned his attention to the new-fangled flying machine. He was instrumental in the formation of the British and Colonial Aeroplane Company in 1910 and was most adamant that chassis production should be moved as soon as possible from the Filton depot so that he could start building aircraft there.

This was achieved in 1912 when the bus company moved to new premises and the two iron sheds of the Filton depot developed into the large works and airfield of today.

The new works were at Brislington, just up the road from the tram depot, and became known as The Motor Constructional Works (M.C.W.).

The year 1929 marked the first connection of the Bristol firm with another when The Great Western Railway Company acquired a financial interest. In 1932 this was transferred to the Western National Omnibus Company Ltd., a subsidiary of the Thomas Tilling Group, who had a controlling interest.

Shortage of space at M.C.W. led to the purchase of additional works at Chatsworth Road in 1935. These works were situated to the city side of Brislington depot and the final assembly of chassis was moved there.

In 1943 a private company was formed with the object of eventually separating the manufacturing side of the company from its bus fleet operations. This company was Bristol Commercial Vehicles Ltd. (B.C.V.) but its formation was to have no immediate effect.

With the passing of the 1947 Transport Act and the resulting nationalisation, control of the company passed to the British Transport Commission and the sale of Bristol chassis was now limited to undertakings controlled by them. Bristol Commercial Vehicles finally became a working company in 1955 although it was still controlled by the British Transport Commission.

On October 1st 1965, The Leyland Motor Corporation acquired a 25% interest in B.C.V. and the Bristol chassis again became available on the open market.

Leyland gained total control in 1983 and the Bristol works were closed within a year, adding another name to the list of ceased British chassis manufacturers.

Bristol Commercial Vehicles in Bath Road Brislington had been building buses since 1912 later to be taken over by British Leyland - its customer base was world wide it closed down in 1983 with full order books?









electric motor repair parts







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Post je objavljen 04.11.2011. u 23:15 sati.