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CLEAN MOLD FROM BASEMENT WALLS - FROM BASEMENT WALLS


CLEAN MOLD FROM BASEMENT WALLS - CLEANING WHITE GROUT



Clean Mold From Basement Walls





clean mold from basement walls






    basement walls
  • (basement wall) A wall of a building that is mostly below grade.





    clean
  • clean and jerk: a weightlift in which the barbell is lifted to shoulder height and then jerked overhead

  • Make (something or someone) free of dirt, marks, or mess, esp. by washing, wiping, or brushing

  • free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits; "children with clean shining faces"; "clean white shirts"; "clean dishes"; "a spotlessly clean house"; "cats are clean animals"

  • Remove the innards of (fish or poultry) prior to cooking

  • make clean by removing dirt, filth, or unwanted substances from; "Clean the stove!"; "The dentist cleaned my teeth"





    mold
  • cast: the distinctive form in which a thing is made; "pottery of this cast was found throughout the region"

  • The upper soil of cultivated land, esp. when rich in organic matter

  • Soft loose earth

  • model: form in clay, wax, etc; "model a head with clay"

  • container into which liquid is poured to create a given shape when it hardens











clean mold from basement walls - Basements -




Basements - All About Basement Finishing


Basements - All About Basement Finishing



Easily And Quickly Learn How To Finally Enjoy Your Basement... Even If It's Wet, Cluttered, And Scary.

Do you want to make more out of your basement... but currently only use it for boxes and Christmas decorations?

Your Basement Has More Potential Than You Ever Thought It Did

To some they are sources of joy, with furnished rooms, comfortable atmospheres, and plenty of storage.

To others, they are dark storage spots.

But many have found the keys to a great basement.

They've learned that basements don't just have to be used for storage.

They can be great places to have "fun" rooms in their house.

Why Not Turn That Space Into the Room You've Always Wanted?

Basements don't have to be wet, dark, and somewhat scary places where you store boxes of stuff you never look at.

They can be changed into something great!

Lighting can be fixed, the temperature can be corrected, and bugs and rodents can be dealt with.

In fact, even wet, dank basements can be turned into something you're proud of.

It feels too overwhelming, but it doesn't have to be. You just have to know what you're doing...

Many basements stay the way they are because people don't have a vision for what they could be.

Just imagine what your basement could be if you put the effort into it.

Another living room? A downstairs bar? A craft room?

That's why I've written this book, Basements. I want everyone to know what I've learned about working with basements without all the trouble (and expense!) of trying to figure it out themselves.

Basements can take your homes to another level.

Besides being a source of joy, a finished basement can increase the value of your home.

Do you really want to live in the dark about how to turn your basement into something great?

My book can help you come out of the dark and have a great basement in no time!

You'll discover...

* Basement Basics... laying the foundation for a great basement.

* Basement Types... know what to do with what you have.

* Dealing With Wet Basements... make that space usable again!

* Renovating Ideas... have the basement you've always wanted, but have never had.

* And a lot more

This is a complete guide to basements and itís simply called Basements. I've put everything I know about basements into simple, understandable language so that you can easily learn all there is to know about your basement. Things like...

* The History of Basements: The intriguing history of the basement's past and evolution! (page 6)

* Basement Basics: Better understanding your basement will help you better utilize your basement (pages 7-8)

* Basement Types: Whether you're building or buying, make the best use out of your basement type (pages 9-17)

* A Cellar Or Basement? They're not the same. Find out which you have and how to use it (pages 12-13)

* Crawl Spaces: Finally, keys on how to use that crawl space! (pages 13-16)

* Basement Design: Know what you're working with and make the best basement you possibly can! (pages 17-19)

* Temperature And Humidity... Tips on how to take control of your basement's climate once and for all (page 19)

* Basement Flooring... Have a floor that you will love for years to come (pages 19-24)

* In-Floor Heating: This is a "must have" option, especially if you're building. But even if you're not, it's still the best way to heat your basement... (pages 25-26)

* Dealing With Wet Basements: There are 4 main reasons a basement gets wet, and understanding them will help keep your basement dry (pages 27-28)

* Gutters: How your gutters can cause your basement to flood, and how to correct it... (pages 28-29)

* Other Water Problems: Great keys to overcoming your watery basement (pages 29-32)

* Finishing Your Basement: Time saving tips that can help you get your basement finished sooner than you thought possible (pages 43-49)

* Plus much, MUCH MORE!

Easily And Quickly Learn How To Finally Enjoy Your Basement... Even If It's Wet, Cluttered, And Scary.

Do you want to make more out of your basement... but currently only use it for boxes and Christmas decorations?

Your Basement Has More Potential Than You Ever Thought It Did

To some they are sources of joy, with furnished rooms, comfortable atmospheres, and plenty of storage.

To others, they are dark storage spots.

But many have found the keys to a great basement.

They've learned that basements don't just have to be used for storage.

They can be great places to have "fun" rooms in their house.

Why Not Turn That Space Into the Room You've Always Wanted?

Basements don't have to be wet, dark, and somewhat scary places where you store boxes of stuff you never look at.

They can be changed into something great!

Lighting can be fixed, the temperature can be corrected, and bugs and rodents can be dealt with.

In fact, even wet, dank basements can be turned into something you're proud of.

It feels too overwhelming, but it doesn't have to be. You just have to know what you're doing...

Many basements stay the way they are because people don't have a vision for what they could be.

Just imagine what your basement could be if you put the effort into it.

Another living room? A downstairs bar? A craft room?

That's why I've written this book, Basements. I want everyone to know what I've learned about working with basements without all the trouble (and expense!) of trying to figure it out themselves.

Basements can take your homes to another level.

Besides being a source of joy, a finished basement can increase the value of your home.

Do you really want to live in the dark about how to turn your basement into something great?

My book can help you come out of the dark and have a great basement in no time!

You'll discover...

* Basement Basics... laying the foundation for a great basement.

* Basement Types... know what to do with what you have.

* Dealing With Wet Basements... make that space usable again!

* Renovating Ideas... have the basement you've always wanted, but have never had.

* And a lot more

This is a complete guide to basements and itís simply called Basements. I've put everything I know about basements into simple, understandable language so that you can easily learn all there is to know about your basement. Things like...

* The History of Basements: The intriguing history of the basement's past and evolution! (page 6)

* Basement Basics: Better understanding your basement will help you better utilize your basement (pages 7-8)

* Basement Types: Whether you're building or buying, make the best use out of your basement type (pages 9-17)

* A Cellar Or Basement? They're not the same. Find out which you have and how to use it (pages 12-13)

* Crawl Spaces: Finally, keys on how to use that crawl space! (pages 13-16)

* Basement Design: Know what you're working with and make the best basement you possibly can! (pages 17-19)

* Temperature And Humidity... Tips on how to take control of your basement's climate once and for all (page 19)

* Basement Flooring... Have a floor that you will love for years to come (pages 19-24)

* In-Floor Heating: This is a "must have" option, especially if you're building. But even if you're not, it's still the best way to heat your basement... (pages 25-26)

* Dealing With Wet Basements: There are 4 main reasons a basement gets wet, and understanding them will help keep your basement dry (pages 27-28)

* Gutters: How your gutters can cause your basement to flood, and how to correct it... (pages 28-29)

* Other Water Problems: Great keys to overcoming your watery basement (pages 29-32)

* Finishing Your Basement: Time saving tips that can help you get your basement finished sooner than you thought possible (pages 43-49)

* Plus much, MUCH MORE!










83% (6)





19th (originally 25th) Police Precinct Station House




19th (originally 25th) Police Precinct Station House





Upper East Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The 19th (originally 25th) Police Precinct Station House, located on the north side of East 67th Street between Lexington and Third Avenues, was built in 1886-87 to the design of Nathaniel D. Bush. Appointed Architect to the New York City Police Department in 1862, Bush was responsible for the design of station houses in the city until 1895. Bush's design for this station house, a significant departure from his earlier, simpler buildings, appears to have been influenced by skyscraper and commercial building design of the previous decade in New York City. The midblock station house, five stories high above a basement, was constructed with a cross-shaped plan with one-bay wings and is faced in red brick and gray granite with contrasting buff- colored stone detail. The design combines elements of the and the Renaissance Revival and

neo-Grec styles. The three-bay main facade, articulated as a grid formed by continuous rusticated stone piers and intermediate cornices, successfully affirmed the authority of the Police Department in the rapidly expanding Upper East Side neighborhood. This station house has served the 19th Precinct since 1929. In 1990-92, the building was rehabilitated and received a new rear addition. Today, it is one of ten Bush-designed station houses in Manhattan known to survive, and is one of only two to continue serving its original function. In addition, it remains an integral component of its blockfront, consisting of four impressive nineteenth-century institutional buildings, all designated New York City Landmarks.
Police Precinct Station House, !9-21 Elizabeth Street."

The 28th Police Precinct on the Upper East Side

As Manhattan's population pushed northward into the Upper East Side in the nineteenth century, the district, though it was still relatively sparsely settled, needed a police station house. In 1852, a modest four-story brick-clad station house for the 19th Precinct was built at 220 East 59th Street. After 1878, with the construction of a new station house at 163 East 51st Street, the 1852 building served the 28th Police Precinct.

Other neighborhood institutions included Grammar School No. 76, the German Hospital, the Institution for the Improved Instruction of Deaf Mutes, the Ladies Home Society of the Baptist Church, the Presbyterian Home, the Home for the Aged Poor, the Colored Home and Hospital, the Union Theological Seminary, and St. Vincent Ferrer Church and Convent. Describing the need for a new police station house in the area in 1885.

Newly-elected mayor Franklin Edson had called in 1883 for new police station houses to replace inadequate ones, and wealthy residents of the 28th Precinct petitioned the mayor to furnish the precinct with more patrolmen. A police commission study concluded that the existing station house would be unable to absorb additional personnel and that the station house's location on 59th Street, at the southern edge of the precinct, made it difficult to provide consistent police coverage. Costello noted in 1885 that "although it has a separate prison it is the unhealthiest and most antiquated structure in the city."'^ For a brief period, additional space was leased in an adjacent frame structure. By the mid- 18805, however, the Police Department had decided, after considering several sites, to build a new station house on a lot on East 67th Street, between Lexington and Third Avenues, that was both city- owned and centrally-located.'s The lot to the east had been occupied by Engine Company No. 39 since 1875.

The 25th Police Precinct Station House

The Board of Estimate and Apportionment appropriated $70,000 for the police station house project. Costello reported in 1885 that Nathaniel Bush "is now engaged on plans for the new Twenty- eighth Precinct Station House,and that "in a few months a magnificent station house for this command is to be built on the north side of Sixty- seventh Street," with a separate prison, at a cost to exceed $80,000

The design as reported was "four stories high, with a mansard roof, and will be built of brick with bluestone copings and terra cotta trimmings. The general plan of the interior arrangements wil! be much the same as in other city police stations. . . One novel feature of the new station house will be the prison connected with it... a separate building in the rear... [in which] the walls wil! be deadened with sheet iron" so that "the howlings of noisy drunken people locked in the cells shall not be heard. The new police station house was not, however, built according to this design, and ended up being the second of two adjacent municipal projects built on East 67th Street during the 1880s. According to the New "though the

project to put a new police station in the neighborhood was suggested first, the Fire Department took the lead in breaking ground and getting the masons at work... The











19th (originally 25th) Police Precinct Station House




19th (originally 25th) Police Precinct Station House





Upper East Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States.

The 19th (originally 25th) Police Precinct Station House, located on the north side of East 67th Street between Lexington and Third Avenues, was built in 1886-87 to the design of Nathaniel D. Bush. Appointed Architect to the New York City Police Department in 1862, Bush was responsible for the design of station houses in the city until 1895. Bush's design for this station house, a significant departure from his earlier, simpler buildings, appears to have been influenced by skyscraper and commercial building design of the previous decade in New York City. The midblock station house, five stories high above a basement, was constructed with a cross-shaped plan with one-bay wings and is faced in red brick and gray granite with contrasting buff- colored stone detail. The design combines elements of the and the Renaissance Revival and

neo-Grec styles. The three-bay main facade, articulated as a grid formed by continuous rusticated stone piers and intermediate cornices, successfully affirmed the authority of the Police Department in the rapidly expanding Upper East Side neighborhood. This station house has served the 19th Precinct since 1929. In 1990-92, the building was rehabilitated and received a new rear addition. Today, it is one of ten Bush-designed station houses in Manhattan known to survive, and is one of only two to continue serving its original function. In addition, it remains an integral component of its blockfront, consisting of four impressive nineteenth-century institutional buildings, all designated New York City Landmarks.
Police Precinct Station House, !9-21 Elizabeth Street."

The 28th Police Precinct on the Upper East Side

As Manhattan's population pushed northward into the Upper East Side in the nineteenth century, the district, though it was still relatively sparsely settled, needed a police station house. In 1852, a modest four-story brick-clad station house for the 19th Precinct was built at 220 East 59th Street. After 1878, with the construction of a new station house at 163 East 51st Street, the 1852 building served the 28th Police Precinct.

Other neighborhood institutions included Grammar School No. 76, the German Hospital, the Institution for the Improved Instruction of Deaf Mutes, the Ladies Home Society of the Baptist Church, the Presbyterian Home, the Home for the Aged Poor, the Colored Home and Hospital, the Union Theological Seminary, and St. Vincent Ferrer Church and Convent. Describing the need for a new police station house in the area in 1885.

Newly-elected mayor Franklin Edson had called in 1883 for new police station houses to replace inadequate ones, and wealthy residents of the 28th Precinct petitioned the mayor to furnish the precinct with more patrolmen. A police commission study concluded that the existing station house would be unable to absorb additional personnel and that the station house's location on 59th Street, at the southern edge of the precinct, made it difficult to provide consistent police coverage. Costello noted in 1885 that "although it has a separate prison it is the unhealthiest and most antiquated structure in the city."'^ For a brief period, additional space was leased in an adjacent frame structure. By the mid- 18805, however, the Police Department had decided, after considering several sites, to build a new station house on a lot on East 67th Street, between Lexington and Third Avenues, that was both city- owned and centrally-located.'s The lot to the east had been occupied by Engine Company No. 39 since 1875.

The 25th Police Precinct Station House

The Board of Estimate and Apportionment appropriated $70,000 for the police station house project. Costello reported in 1885 that Nathaniel Bush "is now engaged on plans for the new Twenty- eighth Precinct Station House,and that "in a few months a magnificent station house for this command is to be built on the north side of Sixty- seventh Street," with a separate prison, at a cost to exceed $80,000

The design as reported was "four stories high, with a mansard roof, and will be built of brick with bluestone copings and terra cotta trimmings. The general plan of the interior arrangements wil! be much the same as in other city police stations. . . One novel feature of the new station house will be the prison connected with it... a separate building in the rear... [in which] the walls wil! be deadened with sheet iron" so that "the howlings of noisy drunken people locked in the cells shall not be heard. The new police station house was not, however, built according to this design, and ended up being the second of two adjacent municipal projects built on East 67th Street during the 1880s. According to the New "though the

project to put a new police station in the neighborhood was suggested first, the Fire Department took the lead in breaking ground and getting the masons at work... Th









clean mold from basement walls








clean mold from basement walls




Waterproof Your Basement Yourself Save a Bundle of Cash Complete step by step Guide to Waterproofing






For years Iíve struggled with my own wet basement Ė until I hit upon a solution. I thought, ďWhy should I spend thousands of dollars for basement remodeling if I can do the repairs and modifications myself?Ē For a long time, I thought only skilled contractors could do it. Boy, was I wrong.

After diving headfirst into books about waterproofing and house design, I came up with a simple system for waterproofing just about any kind of basement. Whether you have a large basement with concrete or a simple crawlspace for old stuff, you can perform basement waterproofing on your own with a little DIY spirit, some tools, and a little hard work.

Iím sure that many of you donít want to pay thousands of dollars up front just to fix a damp basement. If youíre like me, you probably have more important stuff lined up for that kind of money. So without further delay, letís tackle the problem of basement waterproofing.

There are different waterproofing systems that you can try. Depending on your houseís design, your budget, and the kind of time you have free for this DIY undertaking, you can choose to install a sump pump, a dehumidifier, etc.. All of these approaches will be discussed in detail in this book.

For years Iíve struggled with my own wet basement Ė until I hit upon a solution. I thought, ďWhy should I spend thousands of dollars for basement remodeling if I can do the repairs and modifications myself?Ē For a long time, I thought only skilled contractors could do it. Boy, was I wrong.

After diving headfirst into books about waterproofing and house design, I came up with a simple system for waterproofing just about any kind of basement. Whether you have a large basement with concrete or a simple crawlspace for old stuff, you can perform basement waterproofing on your own with a little DIY spirit, some tools, and a little hard work.

Iím sure that many of you donít want to pay thousands of dollars up front just to fix a damp basement. If youíre like me, you probably have more important stuff lined up for that kind of money. So without further delay, letís tackle the problem of basement waterproofing.

There are different waterproofing systems that you can try. Depending on your houseís design, your budget, and the kind of time you have free for this DIY undertaking, you can choose to install a sump pump, a dehumidifier, etc.. All of these approaches will be discussed in detail in this book.










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Post je objavljen 28.10.2011. u 09:31 sati.