CHRISTMAS DECORATION OUTDOOR

03.10.2011., ponedjeljak

DECORATING WITH LIGHTHOUSES - WITH LIGHTHOUSES


Decorating with lighthouses - Home decorators stores.



Decorating With Lighthouses





decorating with lighthouses






    lighthouses
  • (lighthouse) beacon: a tower with a light that gives warning of shoals to passing ships

  • A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses or, in older times, from a fire, and used as an aid to navigation for pilots at sea or on inland waterways.

  • A tower or other structure containing a beacon light to warn or guide ships at sea

  • (Lighthouse (album)) Light House is a studio album by Kim Carnes, released in 1986 (see 1986 in music).





    decorating
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"

  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc

  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it

  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)

  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"











decorating with lighthouses - The World's




The World's Greatest Lighthouses


The World's Greatest Lighthouses



Escape into these spectacular color photographs of more than 50 of the world's most beautiful lighthouses. They hail from North American shores such as the Outer Banks, Nova Scotia, Bermuda, and the California and Oregon coasts, as well as throughout the Mediterranean, the North Sea, the South Pacific, Asian waters, and the Caribbean.This book is dedicated to the lighthouses of history, legends, films, novels, and personal reveries. Spectacular Atlantic storms rage just outside the cozy interiors, which often contain the most unusual furniture. The text covers the individual characteristics, location, and history of these extraordinary coastal monuments, together with their technical development and the complex psychology of the modern-day hermits who live in them. This book is for all who love the seacoast and its architecture.










82% (18)





Coquille River Lighthouse.




Coquille River Lighthouse.





Coquille River Lighthouse.

The area around the present-day town of Bandon was inhabited by the Coquille Indians, before white settlers started to arrive in 1850. The town site was settled in 1853 and was first called Averill. After the arrival of several immigrants from Bandon, Ireland in 1873, the town’s name was changed to Bandon in 1874.

djacent to the town, the Coquille River empties into the Pacific Ocean. The river extends inland a great distance, and was a natural link to the virgin stands of timber in the area. The bar at the mouth of the river, formed by the interaction of the river and ocean, was a major obstacle for the ships entering the river. At times, only a few feet of water would cover the bar, but still vessels attempted to navigate the river in hopes of reaping the rewards that lay upstream. In 1880, Congress passed a bill providing for the construction of a jetty on the south side of the river’s entrance. The jetty created a clear channel in the river, prompting a rapid rise in the number of ships entering the river.

A Coquille River Lighthouse was the next logical step for improving navigation at the river’s mouth. The lighthouse would act as both a coastal light and a harbor light. A bill authorizing its construction was passed in 1891, but it would be four years before land was purchased, plans were solidified, and the construction crew arrived on site.

The workers first leveled the top of Rackleff Rock to provide a base for the lighthouse and oil house. Local stone was cut to form the structure’s foundation, while the lighthouse itself was built of brick, covered with a layer of stucco. The design was unique with a cylindrical tower attached to the east side of an elongated, octagonal room, which housed the fog signal equipment and had a large trumpet protruding from its western wall.

A long, wooden walkway connected the lighthouse to the keepers’ dwelling, 650 feet away. The dwelling was a one-and-one-half story duplex, and a barn was located 150 feet beyond the dwelling. Two keepers, both transferred in from Heceta Head, took up residence at the new station during the first part of 1896. The fourth-order Fresnel lens was first shown from the tower on February 29, 1896. A snowstorm settled in the next day, necessitating the first use of the fog signal.

n the late 1910s, Oscar Langlois became a keeper at the lighthouse. He was born at the Cape Blanco Lighthouse, where his father was serving as principal keeper. Choosing the same career for himself, Oscar accepted his first assignment to the Cape Arago Lighthouse in 1905. There, he met his wife, Marie Amundsen, daughter of the principal keeper.

During Langlois’ lengthy service at the Coquille River Lighthouse, a forest fire swept into Bandon in 1936 and consumed all but sixteen of the towns’ 500 buildings. The lighthouse, separated from the fire by a water barrier, was not damaged. However, ash and soot found its way into the lighthouse requiring extra work from the keepers, who also provided shelter for some of the now homeless residents of Bandon.

In 1939, the Coast Guard took responsibility for the lighthouse and decided it was no longer needed. An automated beacon was placed at the end of the south jetty, the dwelling was disassembled, and the lighthouse was abandoned. The Bandon Lighthouse stood neglected for twenty-four years, until Bullards Beach State Park was created on the north side of the river. The grounds of the original 11-acre light station were included in the park, and the park assumed responsibility for the lighthouse.

The damage inflicted on the lighthouse by time and vandals was too much for the park system to reverse by itself. A joint restoration effort involving Oregon State Parks and the Army Corps of Engineers was launched in 1976. The roof was repaired, bricks were replaced, and the lighthouse received a fresh coat of paint before it was opened to the public.

As part of the Bandon centennial celebration in 1991, a solar-powered light was placed in the tower. The lighthouse is further illuminated in December, when it is decorated with festive lights.

Violent winter storms deposit piles of drift wood on the beach near the lighthouse and have eaten away at the lighthouse’s foundation. To correct this problem, a restoration effort, costing over $600,000, was carried out during the summer of 2007. The project included removing damaged stucco, repainting the exterior, replacing the roof, adding a false chimney, and repairing copper flashing. The colors used to paint the lighthouse were reportedly found on some older layers of stucco, but some locals strongly oppose the new color scheme and insist that white is the historically accurate color. (Referenced from Lighthousefriends.com)











Coquille River Light




Coquille River Light





Coquille River Lighthouse
The area around the present-day town of Bandon was inhabited by the Coquille Indians, before white settlers started to arrive in 1850. The town site was settled in 1853 and was first called Averill. After the arrival of several immigrants from Bandon, Ireland in 1873, the town’s name was changed to Bandon in 1874.

djacent to the town, the Coquille River empties into the Pacific Ocean. The river extends inland a great distance, and was a natural link to the virgin stands of timber in the area. The bar at the mouth of the river, formed by the interaction of the river and ocean, was a major obstacle for the ships entering the river. At times, only a few feet of water would cover the bar, but still vessels attempted to navigate the river in hopes of reaping the rewards that lay upstream. In 1880, Congress passed a bill providing for the construction of a jetty on the south side of the river’s entrance. The jetty created a clear channel in the river, prompting a rapid rise in the number of ships entering the river.

A Coquille River Lighthouse was the next logical step for improving navigation at the river’s mouth. The lighthouse would act as both a coastal light and a harbor light. A bill authorizing its construction was passed in 1891, but it would be four years before land was purchased, plans were solidified, and the construction crew arrived on site.

The workers first leveled the top of Rackleff Rock to provide a base for the lighthouse and oil house. Local stone was cut to form the structure’s foundation, while the lighthouse itself was built of brick, covered with a layer of stucco. The design was unique with a cylindrical tower attached to the east side of an elongated, octagonal room, which housed the fog signal equipment and had a large trumpet protruding from its western wall.

A long, wooden walkway connected the lighthouse to the keepers’ dwelling, 650 feet away. The dwelling was a one-and-one-half story duplex, and a barn was located 150 feet beyond the dwelling. Two keepers, both transferred in from Heceta Head, took up residence at the new station during the first part of 1896. The fourth-order Fresnel lens was first shown from the tower on February 29, 1896. A snowstorm settled in the next day, necessitating the first use of the fog signal.

n the late 1910s, Oscar Langlois became a keeper at the lighthouse. He was born at the Cape Blanco Lighthouse, where his father was serving as principal keeper. Choosing the same career for himself, Oscar accepted his first assignment to the Cape Arago Lighthouse in 1905. There, he met his wife, Marie Amundsen, daughter of the principal keeper.

During Langlois’ lengthy service at the Coquille River Lighthouse, a forest fire swept into Bandon in 1936 and consumed all but sixteen of the towns’ 500 buildings. The lighthouse, separated from the fire by a water barrier, was not damaged. However, ash and soot found its way into the lighthouse requiring extra work from the keepers, who also provided shelter for some of the now homeless residents of Bandon.

In 1939, the Coast Guard took responsibility for the lighthouse and decided it was no longer needed. An automated beacon was placed at the end of the south jetty, the dwelling was disassembled, and the lighthouse was abandoned. The Bandon Lighthouse stood neglected for twenty-four years, until Bullards Beach State Park was created on the north side of the river. The grounds of the original 11-acre light station were included in the park, and the park assumed responsibility for the lighthouse.

The damage inflicted on the lighthouse by time and vandals was too much for the park system to reverse by itself. A joint restoration effort involving Oregon State Parks and the Army Corps of Engineers was launched in 1976. The roof was repaired, bricks were replaced, and the lighthouse received a fresh coat of paint before it was opened to the public.

As part of the Bandon centennial celebration in 1991, a solar-powered light was placed in the tower. The lighthouse is further illuminated in December, when it is decorated with festive lights.

Violent winter storms deposit piles of drift wood on the beach near the lighthouse and have eaten away at the lighthouse’s foundation. To correct this problem, a restoration effort, costing over $600,000, was carried out during the summer of 2007. The project included removing damaged stucco, repainting the exterior, replacing the roof, adding a false chimney, and repairing copper flashing. The colors used to paint the lighthouse were reportedly found on some older layers of stucco, but some locals strongly oppose the new color scheme and insist that white is the historically accurate color.











decorating with lighthouses








decorating with lighthouses




Lighthouses






In a bygone American era, shipping was crucial in both trade and travel. It was the lighthouse that allowed ships to arrive safely in port, despite rough waters, rocky coasts, and punishing weather. Beacons of safety and hope, these stalwart sentinels of the American coasts are still treasured today by mariners and landlubbers alike. LIGHTHOUSES captures the beauty and nostalgia of these lights in the storm. Breathtaking color photography from renowned photographer Laurence Parent reveals the strength and splendor of these coastal beacons. Lighthouse authority Elinor DeWire's fascinating history of United States lighthouses details the stories of both the sentinels and their keepers, from the Northeast coast to the Great Lakes, down to the South and the Gulf of Mexico, all the way to the Pacific shore.










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CHRISTMAS DECORATION OUTDOOR

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