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HOW TO DECORATE AN OFFICE AT WORK. HOW TO DECORATE AN


How to decorate an office at work. Ceiling decorating ideas. Wholesale western decor.



How To Decorate An Office At Work





how to decorate an office at work






    decorate
  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it

  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc

  • deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)

  • award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"

  • make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"





    at work
  • Those who do any work even for one hour during the reference period for pay or profit, or work without pay on the farm or business enterprise operated by a member of the same household related by blood, marriage or adoption; or

  • at work(p): on the job; "had been at work for over an hour before her boss arrived"

  • in relation to any person, means present, for gain or reward, in the person's place of work.





    how to
  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.

  • Providing detailed and practical advice

  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic

  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations





    office
  • A room, department, or building used to provide a particular service

  • function: the actions and activities assigned to or required or expected of a person or group; "the function of a teacher"; "the government must do its part"; "play its role"

  • The local center of a large business

  • place of business where professional or clerical duties are performed; "he rented an office in the new building"

  • agency: an administrative unit of government; "the Central Intelligence Agency"; "the Census Bureau"; "Office of Management and Budget"; "Tennessee Valley Authority"

  • A room, set of rooms, or building used as a place for commercial, professional, or bureaucratic work











how to decorate an office at work - Your Brain




Your Brain at Work


Your Brain at Work



Meet Emily and Paul, the parents of two young children. Emily is a newly promoted executive in a large corporation, while Paul has his own business as a consultant. Their lives, like all of ours, are filled with a bewildering blizzard of emails, phone calls, yet more emails, meetings, projects, proposals, and plans. For them, just staying ahead of the storm has become a seemingly insurmountable task.
In this book, we travel inside the brains of Emily and Paul as they attempt to sort the vast quantities of information they're presented with and figure out how to prioritize, organize, and act on it. Fortunately for Emily and Paul—and for readers of Your Brain at Work—they're in good hands: David Rock knows how the brain works—and more specifically, how it works in a work setting.
Your Brain at Work explores:
Why your brains feels so taxed, and how to take full advantage of your mental resources
Why it's so hard to focus, and how to better manage distractions
How to maximize your chance of finding insights that can solve seemingly insurmountable problems
How to keep your cool in any situation, so that you can make the best decisions possible
How to collaborate with others more effectively
Why providing feedback is so difficult, and how to make it easier
How to effectively change other people's behavior
Rock shows how it's possible not only to survive in today's overwhelming work environment but to succeed in it—and still feel energized at the end of the day, with a sense of accomplishment.

Meet Emily and Paul, the parents of two young children. Emily is a newly promoted executive in a large corporation, while Paul has his own business as a consultant. Their lives, like all of ours, are filled with a bewildering blizzard of emails, phone calls, yet more emails, meetings, projects, proposals, and plans. For them, just staying ahead of the storm has become a seemingly insurmountable task.
In this book, we travel inside the brains of Emily and Paul as they attempt to sort the vast quantities of information they're presented with and figure out how to prioritize, organize, and act on it. Fortunately for Emily and Paul—and for readers of Your Brain at Work—they're in good hands: David Rock knows how the brain works—and more specifically, how it works in a work setting.
Your Brain at Work explores:
Why your brains feels so taxed, and how to take full advantage of your mental resources
Why it's so hard to focus, and how to better manage distractions
How to maximize your chance of finding insights that can solve seemingly insurmountable problems
How to keep your cool in any situation, so that you can make the best decisions possible
How to collaborate with others more effectively
Why providing feedback is so difficult, and how to make it easier
How to effectively change other people's behavior
Rock shows how it's possible not only to survive in today's overwhelming work environment but to succeed in it—and still feel energized at the end of the day, with a sense of accomplishment.










84% (7)





Hotel Martinique




Hotel Martinique





The Tenderloin, New York City, New York, United States

The Hotel Martinique, a major work of the prominent designer Henry J. Hardenbergh, was constructed in three phases, in 1897-98, 1901-03, and 1909-11. Developer William R. H. Martin, who had invested heavily in real estate in this area of the city, built and expanded the hotel in response to the growth of entertainment, shopping, and transportation activities in this busy midtown section. Martin hired the distinguished architect Henry J. Hardenbergh, who had acquired a reputation for his luxury hotel designs, including the original Waldorf and Astoria Hotels, as well as the Plaza. In his hotel and apartment house designs, Hardenbergh created picturesque compositions based on Beaux-Arts precedents, giving special care to interior planning and appointments.

For the sixteen-story, French Renaissance-inspired style Hotel Martinique, the architect capitalized on the openness made possible by Greeley Square, to show off the building's boldly-scaled mansard roof, with its towers, and ornate dormers. The glazed brick, terra cotta, and limestone-clad structure also features rusticated stonework, balconies and prominent cartouches on all three of its main facades: Broadway, 32nd Street and 33rd Street. Despite having been created in three sections, the building maintains a harmonious street presence on all three facades.

Development of the Area
Near the end of the nineteenth century, the area of Broadway and West 34th Street, or Greeley Square, gained prominence as an important entertainment district. Just as different residential areas had their highs and !ows of popularity in the continuing northward migration of New Yorkers from the tip of Manhattan [stand, so too did quarters for shopping, business and amusements. New Yorkers first began to take a strong interest in the theater and related activities in the early 1850s, with the establishment of Niblo's Garden, near Prince Street and Broadway.

By the 1860s, the most fashionable playhouses and the Academy of Music were located near Union Square. The construction of Madison Square Garden edged New York's rialto up to 23rd Street, along with the fashionable shopping establishments of the Ladies Mile, with the accompanying hotels and restaurants which catered to those in this busy area. By the 1880s Broadway, between 23rd and 42nd Street became New York's glittering "Great White Way" (because of all the electric lights along this section of the street).

This section of Broadway and vicinity was soon lined with theaters and elegant department stores. Restaurants and luxurious hotels followed, serving the many visitors who flocked to this part of town. The Metropolitan Opera House, located at Broadway and 39th Street opened in 1883, and sparked a theatrical move uptown. The Casino Theater, the Manhattan Opera House, and Harrigan's (later the Herald Square Theater) were all soon located nearby. In 1893 the Empire Theatre opened at Broadway and West 41st Street, sparking further development in the area of Longacre Square (later called Times Square). Saks & Co, and R.H. Macy's anchored the shopping at 34th Street, having led the move, beginning in 1901-02, of department stores from below Madison Square. Restaurants such as Rector's and Delmonico's satisfied the gastronomical needs of New York's wealthy, while they stayed at such hotels as the Marlborough, the Normandie, or the Vendome.

To the east, Fifth Avenue had a different tone, set by the establishment of B. AMman's and the Gorham Silver Company, as well as the Knickerbocker Club. This was confirmed by the opening, in 1893 and 1897, of the lavish Waldorf and then the Astoria Hotels (both designed by Henry J. Hardenbergh, architect of the Martinique) on Fifth Avenue, between 33rd and 34th Streets. One block to the west of Greeley Square, the planned Pennsylvania Station promised much future development. Sixth Avenue and 34th Street was also the site of cross-town streetcars, the Sixth Avenue Elevated, and the Hudson Tubes to New Jersey.

The Waldorf and Astoria Hotels proved to be exemplars of hotel design on the exterior as well. Not only did Hardenbergh follow his own design precedents in his later, influential hotel designs, but other architects (such as Clinton & Russell in the Hotel Astor) did as well. A. C. David, writing in 1905, proclaimed that the new, large hotels which were appearing in most cities in the United States were "in a different class architecturally from any similar buildings which have preceded them." This new type was large, a skyscraper (i.e. built with steel-frame construction), but nonetheless was created "in such a manner that it would be distinguished from the office-building and sest some relation to domestic life."'^ To do this, David recommeded the use of warm materials, preferably brick, and a strong roof line with dormers rather than a cornice and flat roof.

The Hotel Martinique













Hotel Martinique




Hotel Martinique





Tenderloin District, Manhattan

The Hotel Martinique, a major work of the prominent designer Henry J. Hardenbergh, was constructed in three phases, in 1897-98, 1901-03, and 1909-11. Developer William R. H. Martin, who had invested heavily in real estate in this area of the city, built and expanded the hotel in response to the growth of entertainment, shopping, and transportation activities in this busy midtown section. Martin hired the distinguished architect Henry J. Hardenbergh, who had acquired a reputation for his luxury hotel designs, including the original Waldorf and Astoria Hotels, as well as the Plaza. In his hotel and apartment house designs, Hardenbergh created picturesque compositions based on Beaux-Arts precedents, giving special care to interior planning and appointments.

For the sixteen-story, French Renaissance-inspired style Hotel Martinique, the architect capitalized on the openness made possible by Greeley Square, to show off the building's boldly-scaled mansard roof, with its towers, and ornate dormers. The glazed brick, terra cotta, and limestone-clad structure also features rusticated stonework, balconies and prominent cartouches on all three of its main facades: Broadway, 32nd Street and 33rd Street. Despite having been created in three sections, the building maintains a harmonious street presence on all three facades.

Development of the Area
Near the end of the nineteenth century, the area of Broadway and West 34th Street, or Greeley Square, gained prominence as an important entertainment district. Just as different residential areas had their highs and !ows of popularity in the continuing northward migration of New Yorkers from the tip of Manhattan [stand, so too did quarters for shopping, business and amusements. New Yorkers first began to take a strong interest in the theater and related activities in the early 1850s, with the establishment of Niblo's Garden, near Prince Street and Broadway.

By the 1860s, the most fashionable playhouses and the Academy of Music were located near Union Square. The construction of Madison Square Garden edged New York's rialto up to 23rd Street, along with the fashionable shopping establishments of the Ladies Mile, with the accompanying hotels and restaurants which catered to those in this busy area. By the 1880s Broadway, between 23rd and 42nd Street became New York's glittering "Great White Way" (because of all the electric lights along this section of the street).

This section of Broadway and vicinity was soon lined with theaters and elegant department stores. Restaurants and luxurious hotels followed, serving the many visitors who flocked to this part of town. The Metropolitan Opera House, located at Broadway and 39th Street opened in 1883, and sparked a theatrical move uptown. The Casino Theater, the Manhattan Opera House, and Harrigan's (later the Herald Square Theater) were all soon located nearby. In 1893 the Empire Theatre opened at Broadway and West 41st Street, sparking further development in the area of Longacre Square (later called Times Square). Saks & Co, and R.H. Macy's anchored the shopping at 34th Street, having led the move, beginning in 1901-02, of department stores from below Madison Square. Restaurants such as Rector's and Delmonico's satisfied the gastronomical needs of New York's wealthy, while they stayed at such hotels as the Marlborough, the Normandie, or the Vendome.

To the east, Fifth Avenue had a different tone, set by the establishment of B. AMman's and the Gorham Silver Company, as well as the Knickerbocker Club. This was confirmed by the opening, in 1893 and 1897, of the lavish Waldorf and then the Astoria Hotels (both designed by Henry J. Hardenbergh, architect of the Martinique) on Fifth Avenue, between 33rd and 34th Streets. One block to the west of Greeley Square, the planned Pennsylvania Station promised much future development. Sixth Avenue and 34th Street was also the site of cross-town streetcars, the Sixth Avenue Elevated, and the Hudson Tubes to New Jersey.

The Waldorf and Astoria Hotels proved to be exemplars of hotel design on the exterior as well. Not only did Hardenbergh follow his own design precedents in his later, influential hotel designs, but other architects (such as Clinton & Russell in the Hotel Astor) did as well. A. C. David, writing in 1905, proclaimed that the new, large hotels which were appearing in most cities in the United States were "in a different class architecturally from any similar buildings which have preceded them." This new type was large, a skyscraper (i.e. built with steel-frame construction), but nonetheless was created "in such a manner that it would be distinguished from the office-building and sest some relation to domestic life."'^ To do this, David recommeded the use of warm materials, preferably brick, and a strong roof line with dormers rather than a cornice and flat roof.

The Hotel Martinique

The Hotel Martinique was









how to decorate an office at work








how to decorate an office at work




Men at Work






It's up to a pair of trash-hauling heroes to clean up the city in this action-comedy starring real-life brothers Charlie Sheen and Emilio Estevez. Garbage men James (Estevez) and Carl (Sheen) dream of opening a surf shop, but often land in hot water due to their practical jokes. When they discover the body of a murdered politician on their route, they attempt to sniff out the killer themselves a bad idea that rapidly ensnares them in a toxic waste scandal. Soon, they're thrown headlong into a manic escapade involving a deranged veteran, an attractive campaign manager, a kidnapped pizza deliveryman and a greedy polluter who wants them hauledoff to a landfill for good!

Proving that a little success can be a dangerous thing, Emilio Estevez parlayed his early-'80s "brat-pack" fame into a dubious directorial career, beginning with 1986's Wisdom (in which Estevez costarred with then-fiancee Demi Moore), and resuming with this sophomore-effort 1990 comedy that benefits most from Emilio's teaming with brother Charlie Sheen. (Close your eyes and listen: their voices sound like their dad Martin Sheen after inhaling helium.) The brothers play a pair of garbage collectors who discover a body on their daily rounds, and the corpse draws them into a scheme involving corrupt politics, illegal hazardous-waste dumping, and a lovely neighbor (Leslie Hope) with connections to the dead guy. Add a wacko Vietnam vet (Keith David), an unsuspecting pizza deliverer (Dean Cameron), and a pair of overzealous cops, and you've got a comedy that lazily rambles from one lightweight scene to another. It's way too loose to have any noteworthy quality, but that's also part of the movie's low-brow appeal: Estevez and Sheen play well together, and this is just their way of goofing off with Hollywood money. With a sharper script and an experienced director, Men at Work could have paid off handsomely. As it is, these sibling antics are amiable enough, and the early-'90s fashion crimes (like Charlie's "dork knob" ponytail) offer an amusing diversion from the lamest gags. --Jeff Shannon










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CERAMIC KITCHEN DECOR
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