06

utorak

rujan

2011

BUILT IN WHITE MICROWAVE : WHITE MICROWAVE


Built In White Microwave : Microwave Oven Hoods : Sharp Half Pint Microwave



Built In White Microwave





built in white microwave






    microwave
  • An electromagnetic wave with a wavelength in the range 0.001–0.3 m, shorter than that of a normal radio wave but longer than those of infrared radiation. Microwaves are used in radar, in communications, and for heating in microwave ovens and in various industrial processes

  • cook or heat in a microwave oven; "You can microwave the leftovers"

  • a short electromagnetic wave (longer than infrared but shorter than radio waves); used for radar and microwave ovens and for transmitting telephone, facsimile, video and data

  • kitchen appliance that cooks food by passing an electromagnetic wave through it; heat results from the absorption of energy by the water molecules in the food





    built in
  • constructed as a non-detachable part of a larger structure; being an essential and permanent part of something; of an included feature that normally comes as an extra

  • (Built-ins) Specific items of personal property which are installed in a real estate improvement such that they become part of the building. Built-in microwave ovens and dishwashers are common examples.

  • existing as an essential constituent or characteristic; "the Ptolemaic system with its built-in concept of periodicity"; "a constitutional inability to tell the truth"

  • Forming an integral part of a structure or device

  • (of a characteristic) Inherent; innate





    white
  • Paint or turn (something) white

  • a member of the Caucasoid race

  • whiten: turn white; "This detergent will whiten your laundry"

  • being of the achromatic color of maximum lightness; having little or no hue owing to reflection of almost all incident light; "as white as fresh snow"; "a bride's white dress"











built in white microwave - Built In




Built In Microwave Oven (White) (14.0625"H x 23.875"W x 15.5625"D)


Built In Microwave Oven (White) (14.0625



Save valuable counter space with a Built In Microwave Oven - giving the kitchen a professional and tidy look with underside task lighting for the countertop. This over the counter microwave provides many different options for placement, works with standard cabinet sizes and does not require a built-in kit or shelf, allowing for smooth installation. An interactive cooking system with custom help includes options for English, Spanish and French. The defrost center automatically sets defrosting times and power levels for meats and poultry by weight. 11 Smart Sensor settings for popular microwave foods for easy cooking everytime! An auto touch control panel is conveniently located underneath the oven door, easy to see and simple to use. Minute plus, keep warm plus (30 minutes), hot water button, one touch serving control and auto popcorn sensor complete this microwave oven. 14 1/8" turntable for even cooking holds a 13" x 9" dish. 1100 watts, 1.5 cubic feet. Also available in Black and Stainless Steel. Assembly level/degree of difficulty: No Assembly Required.










83% (9)





Long Distance Building of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company




Long Distance Building of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company





Tribeca, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States of America

The Long Distance Building of the American Telephone & Telegraph Company was designed by noted architect Ralph Walker, a specialist in the design of communications buildings and partner in the office of Voorhees, Gmelin & Walker; it is one of the largest and best known of his buildings for that industry and is the last of his downtown Manhattan skyscrapers.

Offering upon its completion in 1932 "a range of communications activities not to be seen elsewhere in the world," the building was actually the result of three major building campaigns. Commissioned by telephone executive Union N. Bethell, the original core — called the Walker Lispenard Building - was designed by Cyrus L.W. Eidlitz and McKenzie, Voorhees & Gmelin, Walker's predecessor firm.

It was erected in 1911-14 and enlarged by seven stories later in that decade. A massive alteration, commissioned by James S. McCulloh and designed by Walker, was executed in 1930-32. The building's polychromatic, rough-textured brick exterior, terminating in light-colored brick parapets, champions the Art Deco style through its setbacks, overall sculpted quality, and linear ornament; appropriately, this progressive, technologically-inspired aesthetic successfully broadcasts the building's role in housing the technologically sophisticated equipment of a critical American industry.

Upon the completion of the alterations in 1932, the Long Distance Building was the world's largest long-distance center; its huge concentration of equipment made it a communication crossroads for long-distance telephone calls in the Northeastern United States and all transoceanic calls, for the nationwide network of radio broadcasting companies, and for teletypewriting and telephotography. The building retains both its exterior architectural integrity and its significance to the communications industry.

Early History of the Site

The developmental history of Block 192, on which the Long Distance Building now stands, is similar to that of the surrounding Tribeca neighborhood. During the late eighteenth century, the block was wholly within the farm of the Lispenard family.

The streets adjacent to this block were laid out in the first years of the nineteenth century and paved in 1810; development quickly followed in the form of frame and masonry dwellings. During the commercial transformation of the neighborhood later in the century, some of New York's most prominent merchants - including Peter Lorillard, the Roosevelt family, and Jeremiah Dimick -- bought property on the block.

Some merchants converted the dwellings to business use; others replaced them with store and loft buildings, largely of five stories. However, clusters of older structures survived into the twentieth century at the northwest and southeast corners of the block. In 1909 the New York Telephone Company purchased nine contiguous lots, forming an irregularly-shaped parcel with fronts on both Walker and Lispenard Streets, on which it planned to build its headquarters.

The New York Telephone Company, AT&T, and the Long Lines Department

The telephone business developed rapidly following the early successes of Alexander Graham Bell's inventions in the 1870s. Many small, regional companies were created such as the New York Telephone Company, but these came to be controlled by the American Bell Telephone Company. In 1885, a subsidiary of American Bell, the American Telephone & Telegraph Company (AT&T, and commonly called the Long Distance Company), was incorporated in New York with the purpose of building and operating long-distance telephone lines and connecting the regional companies.

By the turn of the century AT&T had become the central institution of the Bell System. It assumed the holding-company functions previously exercised by American Bell and continued to operate long-distance telephone service — eventually extending to radio-telephone circuits for overseas calls - through its Long Lines Department.

During the early twentieth century, the department's revenues increased dramatically (from $12 million in 1913 to nearly $100 million in 1930) and the necessary infrastructure was built to handle this growth, including many large office and operations structures. During the 1920s and 1930s, the Bell Telephone Company consistently chose for its corporate skyscrapers a modernistic architectural aesthetic and, in so doing, established itself as a prominent and progressive modern business.

Among the people who played a vital role in the organization of the industry was Union N. Bethell (1859-1919).3 A native of Indiana and alumnus of Hanover College, Bethell was employed by the Bell System, starting out with the New York and New Jersey Telephone Company in Brooklyn in 1889.

The general manager of the independent New York Telephone Company by 1893, his business skills proved essential to the industry, whi











Long Distance Building of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company




Long Distance Building of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company





Tribeca, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

The Long Distance Building of the American Telephone & Telegraph Company was designed by noted architect Ralph Walker, a specialist in the design of communications buildings and partner in the office of Voorhees, Gmelin & Walker; it is one of the largest and best known of his buildings for that industry and is the last of his downtown Manhattan skyscrapers.

Offering upon its completion in 1932 "a range of communications activities not to be seen elsewhere in the world," the building was actually the result of three major building campaigns. Commissioned by telephone executive Union N. Bethell, the original core — called the Walker Lispenard Building - was designed by Cyrus L.W. Eidlitz and McKenzie, Voorhees & Gmelin, Walker's predecessor firm.

It was erected in 1911-14 and enlarged by seven stories later in that decade. A massive alteration, commissioned by James S. McCulloh and designed by Walker, was executed in 1930-32. The building's polychromatic, rough-textured brick exterior, terminating in light-colored brick parapets, champions the Art Deco style through its setbacks, overall sculpted quality, and linear ornament; appropriately, this progressive, technologically-inspired aesthetic successfully broadcasts the building's role in housing the technologically sophisticated equipment of a critical American industry.

Upon the completion of the alterations in 1932, the Long Distance Building was the world's largest long-distance center; its huge concentration of equipment made it a communication crossroads for long-distance telephone calls in the Northeastern United States and all transoceanic calls, for the nationwide network of radio broadcasting companies, and for teletypewriting and telephotography. The building retains both its exterior architectural integrity and its significance to the communications industry.

Early History of the Site

The developmental history of Block 192, on which the Long Distance Building now stands, is similar to that of the surrounding Tribeca neighborhood. During the late eighteenth century, the block was wholly within the farm of the Lispenard family.

The streets adjacent to this block were laid out in the first years of the nineteenth century and paved in 1810; development quickly followed in the form of frame and masonry dwellings. During the commercial transformation of the neighborhood later in the century, some of New York's most prominent merchants - including Peter Lorillard, the Roosevelt family, and Jeremiah Dimick -- bought property on the block.

Some merchants converted the dwellings to business use; others replaced them with store and loft buildings, largely of five stories. However, clusters of older structures survived into the twentieth century at the northwest and southeast corners of the block. In 1909 the New York Telephone Company purchased nine contiguous lots, forming an irregularly-shaped parcel with fronts on both Walker and Lispenard Streets, on which it planned to build its headquarters.

The New York Telephone Company, AT&T, and the Long Lines Department

The telephone business developed rapidly following the early successes of Alexander Graham Bell's inventions in the 1870s. Many small, regional companies were created such as the New York Telephone Company, but these came to be controlled by the American Bell Telephone Company. In 1885, a subsidiary of American Bell, the American Telephone & Telegraph Company (AT&T, and commonly called the Long Distance Company), was incorporated in New York with the purpose of building and operating long-distance telephone lines and connecting the regional companies.

By the turn of the century AT&T had become the central institution of the Bell System. It assumed the holding-company functions previously exercised by American Bell and continued to operate long-distance telephone service — eventually extending to radio-telephone circuits for overseas calls - through its Long Lines Department.

During the early twentieth century, the department's revenues increased dramatically (from $12 million in 1913 to nearly $100 million in 1930) and the necessary infrastructure was built to handle this growth, including many large office and operations structures. During the 1920s and 1930s, the Bell Telephone Company consistently chose for its corporate skyscrapers a modernistic architectural aesthetic and, in so doing, established itself as a prominent and progressive modern business.

Among the people who played a vital role in the organization of the industry was Union N. Bethell (1859-1919).3 A native of Indiana and alumnus of Hanover College, Bethell was employed by the Bell System, starting out with the New York and New Jersey Telephone Company in Brooklyn in 1889.

The general manager of the independent New York Telephone Company by 1893, his business skills proved essential to the industry, which had achi









built in white microwave








built in white microwave




Haier HMV1630DBWW 1.6CF Over-the-Range Microwave 1000W, White






Haier HMV1630DBWW 1.6CF Over-the-Range Microwave 1000W, White - This Haier 1.6 cu. ft capacity over-the-range microwave features 1000 watts of cooking power to complement any menu, electronic touch controls with 10 power levels and 3 one touch menu buttons, with 2 speed exhaust fan. This unit is built to work as a ducted or non-ducted ventilation, and is supplied with charcoal filter. Features: 1.6 cu. ft. capacity; 1000 watts of cooking power; Non-sensor cooking; 13.6 in. diameter turntable; 10 power levels; 3 one-touch cooking features; Auto reheat; Auto and time defrost; Kitchen timer; 300 CFM ventilation power; charcoal filter included; 2 speed fan; Ducted / non-ducted capable; Dimensions: 29-7/8"W x 15-3/4"H x 15-1/32"D.










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