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četvrtak, 27.10.2011.

KEBAB SHOP EQUIPMENT : KEBAB SHOP


Kebab Shop Equipment : Mining Construction Equipment : Outdoor Fitness Equipment Australia



Kebab Shop Equipment





kebab shop equipment






    equipment
  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items

  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.

  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service

  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.

  • The necessary items for a particular purpose

  • Mental resources





    kebab
  • kabob: cubes of meat marinated and cooked on a skewer usually with vegetables

  • Kebab (, also kebap, kabab, kebob, kabob, kibob, kebhav, kephav, qabab) is a wide variety of meat dishes originating in Persia , and now found worldwide.

  • A dish of any kind of food cooked in pieces in this way

  • (Kebabs) awesome wraps, not meat on a stick

  • A dish of pieces of meat roasted or grilled on a skewer or spit





    shop
  • A building or part of a building where goods or services are sold; a store

  • An act of going shopping

  • a mercantile establishment for the retail sale of goods or services; "he bought it at a shop on Cape Cod"

  • A place where things are manufactured or repaired; a workshop

  • do one's shopping; "She goes shopping every Friday"

  • patronize: do one's shopping at; do business with; be a customer or client of











kebab shop equipment - Steven Raichlen




Steven Raichlen Best of Barbecue Signature Stainless Steel Grilling Kabob Skewers, Set of 6 (3/8-inch Wide)


Steven Raichlen Best of Barbecue Signature Stainless Steel Grilling Kabob Skewers, Set of 6 (3/8-inch Wide)



Grilling authority, Steven Raichlen, host of the popular cooking series Barbecue University and author of the best-selling Barbecue Bible cookbook series, partnered with The Companion Group to create a fabulous line of innovative, versatile barbecue products. These flat, extra wide skewers look cook and work even better. Ground lamb and chunks of beef or pork, fish, even wet vegetables, like tomatoes and mushrooms won't slip or spin as they do on conventional skewers. All Stainless Steel 3/8-inch wide by 18-inch long.










77% (5)





filmset:The One - in character




filmset:The One - in character





Walking around the old Japanese district of Dalian with a photojournalist student friend who is carrying out a social documentary project on the area, we noticed something unusual. Old signs appeared to be hanging in the doorways and banners lines some of the streets. Some kind of festival perhaps ? Then we came across a huge lighting rig, of the kind that a Hollywood studio might use when shooting on location. What on earth...? We noticed an area roped off and asked some people what it was all about. "Film something something Olympics something" they replied in a heavy Dalian accent. Not only that but apparently no foreigners were allowed beyond the rope. At least not on that street. Five minutes around the corner we approached from another angle and were met enthusiastically by a young Chinese actress, eager to practice her English on two red bearded foreigners.

Seems a film called "The One" was getting shot. It tells the life story of China's first Olympian, a Dalian born sprinter called Liu Changchun. In a time of massive internal strife, he rejected the occupying Japanese's orders to run for the puppet state Manchukuo and instead boarded a boat from Shanghai to become the then Republic of China's sole representitive in the 1932 LA Olympics. They were filming it in this district presumably because it is one of the only relics of old Dalian yet to be re-developed. The old shop signs and crowds of extras in period robes completed the effect.

A group of people had now formed around us, questions were getting thrown around, hands were shaken, business cards given, but the rope was still there, and we were still on the wrong side for taking photos. Nothing seemed to be happening anyway, just lots of waiting around. We retreated back to the nearest restaurant and got stuck into beer and kebabs. My accomplice thought it might be an idea to phone the visiting professor on his photography course, a well respected Dutch photographer and film-maker. So he too arrived on the scene, fabled Leica in hand, just in time for the second round of lamb kebabs. After all the restaurant staff had been lined up under the bare 100 watt bulbs for head and shoulder portraits and the last of the kebabs had been eaten, off went the Prof to check out the film set for himself.

Seemingly ropes mean little when you are able to strike up a conversation with the director themselves about the merits of various kinds of lighting equipment and so after being introduced to the director as the Prof's "young proteges", we found ourselves in the unusual position of being on a full-blown film location during filming with permission to take photos as we wished.

This particular scene being shot mainly consisted of a large imposing man in Japanese military uniform getting out of an enormous black car and beating someone to the ground, as ruthless oppressors are want to do. Lots of shouting, lots of elegant Japanese looking (but actually Chinese) ladies in kimonos and parasols, and lots of smoke. The biggest laugh of the evening probably came when the car door wouldn't open and our Japanese military aggressor started cursing in Chinese.

The next day lots of research was done on-line to fill in the various information gaps. It seems the film is going to be fairly high profile, no mere local TV production. The director is Hou Yong, once time cinematographer for Zhang Yimou, who moved into directing himself more recently with family drama Jasmine Women, starring none other than Zhang Ziyi. A feelgood patriotic tale such as this will obviously pass government censors without any issues at all, and will likely be released in time for the Beijing Olympics next year. Not only that, it will be shown to all the foreign athletes. The film brings to light various questions and issues though.

Firstly, what tone will the film employ in depicting the Japanese occupation ? Will it present a heartwarming tale that embodies the "Olympic Spirit", overcoming oppression in a way that those oppressed the world over will be able to relate to, or will it be unable to resist throwing in some heavy-handed pro-China nationalistic propaganda that even the most ardent anti-fascist foreigner would cringe at watching ? Hopefully the artistic sensibilities of a respected director will prevent it from being the latter.

Secondly, how do the impoverished residents of this district feel about their homes being used in a film set ? Permission from the locals was neither asked nor given prior to the film crew setting up. How do they feel about a film about someone overcoming poverty and oppression being filmed around them while they themselves remain in the city's poor and oppressed underclass ?

Thirdly, there is the issue of how many governments, in this case the Chinese, seem to treat history. This is a government dominated by engineers and economists, where a description of a place as being "heaven on earth" often











filmset:The One - method acting




filmset:The One - method acting





Walking around the old Japanese district of Dalian with a photojournalist student friend who is carrying out a social documentary project on the area, we noticed something unusual. Old signs appeared to be hanging in the doorways and banners lines some of the streets. Some kind of festival perhaps ? Then we came across a huge lighting rig, of the kind that a Hollywood studio might use when shooting on location. What on earth...? We noticed an area roped off and asked some people what it was all about. "Film something something Olympics something" they replied in a heavy Dalian accent. Not only that but apparently no foreigners were allowed beyond the rope. At least not on that street. Five minutes around the corner we approached from another angle and were met enthusiastically by a young Chinese actress, eager to practice her English on two red bearded foreigners.

Seems a film called "The One" was getting shot. It tells the life story of China's first Olympian, a Dalian born sprinter called Liu Changchun. In a time of massive internal strife, he rejected the occupying Japanese's orders to run for the puppet state Manchukuo and instead boarded a boat from Shanghai to become the then Republic of China's sole representitive in the 1932 LA Olympics. They were filming it in this district presumably because it is one of the only relics of old Dalian yet to be re-developed. The old shop signs and crowds of extras in period robes completed the effect.

A group of people had now formed around us, questions were getting thrown around, hands were shaken, business cards given, but the rope was still there, and we were still on the wrong side for taking photos. Nothing seemed to be happening anyway, just lots of waiting around. We retreated back to the nearest restaurant and got stuck into beer and kebabs. My accomplice thought it might be an idea to phone the visiting professor on his photography course, a well respected Dutch photographer and film-maker. So he too arrived on the scene, fabled Leica in hand, just in time for the second round of lamb kebabs. After all the restaurant staff had been lined up under the bare 100 watt bulbs for head and shoulder portraits and the last of the kebabs had been eaten, off went the Prof to check out the film set for himself.

Seemingly ropes mean little when you are able to strike up a conversation with the director themselves about the merits of various kinds of lighting equipment and so after being introduced to the director as the Prof's "young proteges", we found ourselves in the unusual position of being on a full-blown film location during filming with permission to take photos as we wished.

This particular scene being shot mainly consisted of a large imposing man in Japanese military uniform getting out of an enormous black car and beating someone to the ground, as ruthless oppressors are want to do. Lots of shouting, lots of elegant Japanese looking (but actually Chinese) ladies in kimonos and parasols, and lots of smoke. The biggest laugh of the evening probably came when the car door wouldn't open and our Japanese military aggressor started cursing in Chinese.

The next day lots of research was done on-line to fill in the various information gaps. It seems the film is going to be fairly high profile, no mere local TV production. The director is Hou Yong, once time cinematographer for Zhang Yimou, who moved into directing himself more recently with family drama Jasmine Women, starring none other than Zhang Ziyi. A feelgood patriotic tale such as this will obviously pass government censors without any issues at all, and will likely be released in time for the Beijing Olympics next year. Not only that, it will be shown to all the foreign athletes. The film brings to light various questions and issues though.

Firstly, what tone will the film employ in depicting the Japanese occupation ? Will it present a heartwarming tale that embodies the "Olympic Spirit", overcoming oppression in a way that those oppressed the world over will be able to relate to, or will it be unable to resist throwing in some heavy-handed pro-China nationalistic propaganda that even the most ardent anti-fascist foreigner would cringe at watching ?

Secondly, how do the impoverished residents of this district feel about their homes being used in a film set ? Permission from the locals was neither asked nor given prior to the film crew setting up. How do they feel about a film about someone overcoming poverty and oppression being filmed around them while they themselves remain in the city's poor and oppressed underclass ?

Thirdly, there is the issue of how the Chinese seem to view their history. This is a government dominated by engineers and economists, where a description of a place as being "heaven on earth" often means an abundance of ferrous metals in the upper crust. Everything is a resource to be plundered until empty, the land, the pe









kebab shop equipment








kebab shop equipment




The World of Kebabs






150 recipes for an international favorite.
In The World of Kebabs, Anand Prakash compiles 150 of the most mouthwatering recipes he discovered in Europe; the Middle East; Central, South and East Asia; Africa, Latin America; and the Caribbean. Along with information on grilling, marinating, and meat preparation, each recipe has been tested and retested and is presented in an easy-to-follow format. Here are a few examples:
Pork Souvlaki from Greece
Chicken Satay from Malaysia
Spicy Skewered Lamb from China
Mangrove Oyster Kebabs from Trinidad
Skewered Swordfish from Turkey
Spicy Beef Kebabs from Mali
Chicken Tikka Kebabs from India
More than a collection of recipes, Prakash surveys the international dimensions of kebab culture, such as how the dishes migrated to influence cuisine in other geographical regions. The result is a comprehensive reference that is not only a fabulous cookbook but also a form of cultural exploration and travelogue.










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27.10.2011. u 09:50 • 0 KomentaraPrint#^

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