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Saint Saviour's Priory




Saint Saviour's Priory





ST. SAVIOUR'S, DUBLIN.
FOUNDED in 1224, the first of the Dominican abbeys in Ireland. The fathers in that year leased a site adjoining St. Mary's abbey from the Cistercian monks, at a yearly rent of 3, and their convent and church were built by the citizens of Dublin. The sire extended along the river bank from the present Church Street to Ormond Bridge. They had a theological school attached to the abbey from the earliest times.

1238. Their church was finished and dedicated on May 1st, under the title of St. Saviour's.

1270. Henry III., sends them 100 shillings to pay their debts.

1274 to 1300, the Dominicans of Dublin are twice annually on the roll of payments as recipients of the King's alms.

1281. Two provincial chapters were held here.

1285. Edward I. allows them for the fabric of their church thirty oak trees, namely, fifteen from the wood of Glencree and fifteen from that of Newcastle.

1296. A provincial chapter was held here.

1304, June 26. A great fire consumed the church, as well as the church of St. Mary's Abbey and several streets, but on the next feast of St. Agatha (Feb. 5), Lord Eustace le Poer laid the foundation of the new choir. John le Decer, in 1308, gave great help towards the rebuilding of the church.

1309. Sir John Cogan, Sir Walter Faunt and Sir John Fitz Rery, Knts., were interred in the church of this monastery..

1313. A provincial chapter was held here.

1316. The monastery was pulled down on the approach of Edward Bruce's army, and the materials used in repairing the city walls. But when the city was out of danger, Edward II. commanded the citizens to rebuild it..

1351. Kenrick Sherman, who had been provost of Dublin in 1348, died in the monastery, in the midst of the Dominicans, to whom he had been a great benefactor. He had built the belfry, glazed the great east window and roofed the church..

1402. Thomas Cranley, archbishop of Dublin, consecrated the church, on July 9th.

1459. It was enacted by Parliament that this monastery should in future have ten pounds annually in free alms, for necessary repairs, and the statute was confirmed in perpetuity by an Act of 4th and 5th Edward IV.

1488. Sir Richard Edgecomb. sent over to receive the fealty of those who had taken part in the rebellion of Lambert Simnel, lodged in this monastery.

1539. Patrick Hay, the prior, "surrendered" this abbey to the Commissioners of Henry VIII., on July 8th, and it was granted to Sir Thomas Cusacke, at the yearly rent of eight shillings and five pence, Irish money. In the Commissioners' Return regarding the sale of the chattels of the monasteries, such as bells, church plate, etc. (an unpublished document in the Irish Record Office)', we find that the amount received from the sale of the effects of St. Saviour's was ?8 8s. 8d.

Two years after the dissolution of the monastery, John Allen, the chancellor, Sir Gerald Aylmer, Chief Justice Luttrell, White, and others, professors of the law, applied for a twenty-one years' lease of St. Saviour's, which was granted to them.

1578, Feb. 14th, it was granted to Thomas, 10th earl of Ormond, forever, in free soccage, and not in capite, at the yearly rent of twenty shillings, Irish money.

We have no record of the Dominicans in Dublin after this till 1622, when Father Ross Mageoghegan, the vicar-provincial, was residing in Dublin with eight other fathers. In 1627, we have another notice of the Dublin community, in an account of the state of the Irish Province, drawn up by him for Propaganda. It is certain that the Dominicans were located at this time in Cook Street, where the Carmelites and Franciscans also had their establishments.

During the whole of the Cromwellian regime, the fathers stood in the post of danger, according to a discalced Carmelite writing in 1662, and in that year there were two in Dublin.

On the accession of James II., to the throne, the Dominicans got possession of the abbey for a short time, but on the King's arrival in Dublin, they were removed provisionally to Cook Street, as he required the abbey for holding his Parliament in.

In "A particular account of the Romish Clergy, secular and regular, in every Parish of the Diocese of Dublin," drawn up in March, 1697, the following list is given of the Dominicans in St. Audoen's parish:
fr. Thomas Marshall, O.P.
fr. James Hannin , O.P.
fr. James Egan, O.P.
fr. Christopher Farrell, O.P.

On going into exile the following year, the fathers handed their chapel over to the secular clergy, and it became the parish church of St. Audoen's, being known for many years afterwards by the name of “The Old Dominicans."

On the accession of George I., Father Stephen Mac Egan built a chapel near Bridge Street. Though known as "Bridge Street Chapel," it was not in the street itself, but in a court at the end of a lane leading to it. In 1772, a new chapel and convent, on a much larger scale, were finished and decorated. This c











Saint Saviour's - Organ




Saint Saviour's - Organ





ST. SAVIOUR'S, DUBLIN
FOUNDED in 1224, the first of the Dominican abbeys in Ireland. The fathers in that year leased a site adjoining St. Mary's abbey from the Cistercian monks, at a yearly rent of 3, and their convent and church were built by the citizens of Dublin. The site extended along the river bank from the present Church Street to Ormonde Bridge. They had a theological school attached to the abbey from the earliest times. MS. folio vol. in Chetham Library, Manchester, p. 622, written early in the i7th century.

1238. Their church was finished and dedicated on May 1st, under the title of St. Saviour's.

1270. Henry III. sends them 100 shillings to pay their debts.

1274 to 1300, the Dominicans of Dublin are twice annually on the roll of payments as recipients of the King's alms.

1281. Two provincial chapters were held here.

1285. Edward I. allows them for the fabric of their church thirty oak trees, namely, fifteen from the wood of Glencree and fifteen from that of Newcastle.

1296. A provincial chapter was held here.

1304, June 26. A great fire consumed the church, as well as the church of St. Mary's Abbey and several streets, but on the next feast of St. Agatha (Feb. 5), Lord Eustace le Poer laid the foundation of the new choir. John le Decer, in 1308, gave great help towards the rebuilding of the church.

1309. Sir John Cogan, Sir Walter Faunt and Sir John Fitzhenry, Knights., were interred in the church of this monastery..

1313. A provincial chapter was held here.

1316. The monastery was pulled down on the approach of Edward Bruce's army, and the materials used in repairing the city walls. But when the city was out of danger, Edward II. commanded the citizens to rebuild it..

1351. Henrick Sherman, who had been provost of Dublin in 1348, died in the monastery, in the midst of the Dominicans, to whom he had been a great benefactor. He had built the belfry, glazed the great east window and roofed the church.

1402. Thomas Cranley, archbishop of Dublin, consecrated the church, on July 8th.

1459. It was enacted by Parliament that this monastery should in future have ten pounds annually in free alms, for necessary repairs, and the statute was confirmed in perpetuity by an Act of 4th and 5th Edward IV.

1488. Sir Richard Edgecomb sent over to receive the fealty of those who had taken part in the rebellion of Lambert Simnel, lodged in this monastery.

1539. Patrick Hay, the prior, "surrendered" this abbey to the Commissioners of Henry VIII., on July 8th, and it was granted to Sir Thomas Cusacke, at the yearly rent of eight shillings and five pence, Irish money. In the Commissioners' Return regarding the sale of the chattels of the monasteries, such as bells, church plate, etc. (an unpublished document in the Irish Record Office)', we find that the amount received from the sale of the effects of St. Saviour's was ?8 8s. 8d.

Two years after the dissolution of the monastery, John Allen, the chancellor, Sir Gerald Aylmer, Chief Justice Luttrell, White, and others, professors of the law, applied for a twenty-one years' lease of St. Saviour's, which was granted to them.

1578, Feb. I4th, it was granted to Thomas, earl of Ormonde, for ever, in free soccage, and not in capite, at the yearly rent of twenty shillings, Irish money.

We have no record of the Dominicans in Dublin after this till 1622, when Father Ross Mageoghegan, the vicar-provincial, was residing in Dublin with eight other fathers. In 1627, we have another notice of the Dublin community, in an account of the state of the Irish Province, drawn up by him for Propaganda. It is certain that the Dominicans were located at this time in Cook Street, where the Carmelites and Franciscans also had their establishments. During the whole of the Cromwellian regime, the fathers stood in the post of danger, according to a discalced Carmelite writing in 1662, and in that year there were two in Dublin.

On the accession of James II., to the throne, the Dominicans got possession of the abbey for a short time, but on the King's arrival in Dublin, they were removed provisionally to Cook Street, as he required the abbey for holding his Parliament in. In " A particular account of the Romish Clergy, secular and regular, in every Parish of the Diocese of Dublin," drawn up in March, 1697, the following list is given of the Dominicans in St. Audoen's parish : Thomas Marshall , James Hannin, James Egan, Christopher Farrell all Dominican ffryers at the Convent in Cooke Street." On going into exile the following year, the fathers handed their chapel over to the secular clergy, and it became the parish church of St. Audoen's, being known for many years afterwards by the name of " The Old Dominicans." ;

On the accession of George I., Father Stephen Mac Egan built a chapel near Bridge Street. Though known as "Bridge Street Chapel," it was not in the street itself, but in a court at the end of a lane









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