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četvrtak, 27.10.2011.

FRENCH HEALTHY EATING. FRENCH HEALTHY


FRENCH HEALTHY EATING. 3 OZ CHICKEN BREAST CALORIES. HIGH CALORIE BURN WORKOUT



French Healthy Eating





french healthy eating






    healthy eating
  • Human nutrition is the provision to humans to obtain the materials necessary to support life. In general, humans can survive for two to eight weeks without food, depending on stored body fat. Survival without water is usually limited to three or four days.

  • Learn about eating well and proper nutrition.

  • Healthy eating encourages people to enjoy a wide range of foods, to take pleasure in eating a variety of foods, and to emphasize lower-fat foods, grain products, and vegetables and fruit.





    french
  • the Romance language spoken in France and in countries colonized by France

  • Of or relating to France or its people or language

  • cut (e.g, beans) lengthwise in preparation for cooking; "French the potatoes"

  • of or pertaining to France or the people of France; "French cooking"; "a Gallic shrug"











french healthy eating - French Women




French Women Don't Get Fat


French Women Don't Get Fat



Stylish, convincing, wise, funny, and just in time: the ultimate non-diet book, which could radically change the way you think and live – now with more recipes.French women don’t get fat, even though they enjoy bread and pastry, wine, and regular three-course meals. Unlocking the simple secrets of this “French paradox” – how they enjoy food while staying slim and healthy – Mireille Guiliano gives us a charming, inspiring take on health and eating for our times.For anyone who has slipped out of her Zone, missed the flight to South Beach, or accidentally let a carb pass her lips, here is a positive way to stay trim, a culture’s most precious secrets recast for the twenty-first century. A life of wine, bread – even chocolate – without girth or guilt? Pourquoi pas?

The message of this book could be a blessing or a curse, depending on your perspective. There is no hard science, no clearly-defined plan, and no lists of food to have or have not; instead, you'll find simple tricks that boil down to eating carefully prepared seasonal food, exercising more and refusing to think of food as something that inspires guilt. It's both a practical message and far easier said than done in today's "no pain, no gain" culture.
Author Mireille Guiliano is CEO of Veuve Clicquot, and French Women Don't Get Fat offers a concept of sensible pleasures: If you have a chocolate croissant for breakfast, have a vegetable-based lunch--or take an extra walk and pass on the bread basket at dinner. Guiliano's insistence on simple measures slowly creating substantial improvements are reassuring, and her sestion to ignore the scale and learn to live by the "zipper test" could work wonders for those who get wrapped up in tiny details of diet. She sympathizes that deprivation can lead straight to overindulgence when it comes to favorite foods, but then, in a most French manner, treats them as a pleasure that needs to be sated, rather than a battle to be fought.
A number of recipes are included, from a weight-loss enhancing leek soup to a lush chocolate mousse; they read more like what you'd find in a French cookbook rather than an American diet book. Most appealingly, these are guidelines and tricks that could be easily sustainable over a lifetime. If you agree that food is meant to be appreciated--but no more so than having a trim waist--these charmingly French recommendations could set you on the path to a future filled with both croissants and high fashion. --Jill Lightner
Amazon Exclusive Video
Click here to watch Mireille Guiliano introduce French Women Don’t Get Fat to Amazon customers.
Gather Up Your Friends
Click here to learn how to create your own reading group around French Women Don’t Get Fat.



Stuffed Cornish Hens
Serves 4

When I grew up, the holidays always meant lots of visitors and a series of requisite celebratory meals, mostly at lunchtime. This easy dish was always on one of the menus. Mamie was usually busy (what else during late December?) and would make the stuffing in advance so lunch could be ready in less than an hour. The recipe serves a family of four for lunch in style, but double the ingredient portions and obviously you are ready for a full table with guests.

Ingredients:
2 Cornish hens (or poussins)
2 tablespoons butter, melted
3 tablespoons chicken stock
Stuffing:
2 cups water
2/3 cup brown rice
1/2 cup mixed nuts (pine nuts, walnut pieces, whole hazelnuts)
2 tablespoons golden raisins
1/3 cup chicken stock
1 tablespoon parsley, freshly minced
1 teaspoon dry herbs (chervil and savory or rosemary and thyme)
Salt and freshly ground pepper

1. For stuffing: Bring water to a boil. Add rice and cook for 15 minutes. Drain and mix well with remaining ingredients. Season to taste and refrigerate overnight.
2. Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Rinse Cornish hens, dry the inside with paper towels, and season. Add stuffing loosely and truss hens. Reserve remaining stuffing in aluminum foil.
3. Put hens in baking dish and brush them with melted butter and other seasonings. Put in oven and baste 10 minutes later with chicken stock. Continue basting every 10 minutes. After the hens have cooked for 20 minutes reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees and put the remaining stuffing in a small ovenproof dish. Roast the hens for another 20 minutes. Serve (half a hen per person) immediately with a tablespoon of stuffing on each side of the hen as garnish.
N.B. For a wonderful tete-a-tete romantic dinner, serve one hen each with a vegetable then dessert. I have prepared it successfully to my husband on Valentine’s Day. While the hens are in the oven, you have time to concoct a little dessert, et voila, you can pop a cork of bubbly, sit for candlelight dinner and have your husband serve dessert.
Hot Chocolate Souffle
Serves 6

During the season of overindulgences—Christmas, New Year and all the festivities in between—there is in our home a succession of store-brought, traditional goodies: Buche de Noel (yule log), marrons glaces (glazed chestnuts), the 13 desserts of Christmas in Provence. This is not to say that the holidays don’t bring out the baker in all of us, but whether it is to give as gifts or to maintain tradition, people do load up with holiday sweets from pastry shops (as I can attest from seeing from the window of our Paris apartment the annual long lines of people outside the pastry shop across the street). When I grew up, however, come New Year’s Day, and there was a home-cooked chocolate ritual. Our big festive meal was on New Year’s Eve, which left New Year’s Day as a quiet, family "recovery" day. (I appreciate some reverse the big meal day… or have one both days.) Anyway, for us, breakfast was well… late (especially for those of us who went partying after dinner), and limited to a piece of toast and a cup or two of coffee. Lunch was mid afternoon and usually made up of leftovers or an omelet, but the first dinner of the year was marked with a special dessert. The simple meal at the end of a week of overindulgences consisted of a light consomme, some greens, cheese, and the chocolate treat. There were no guests, plenty of time, and Mamie was ready for the flourless souffle. She is a chocoholic and it would be unthinkable to start the year off without chocolate. So, what better way to end the first day of the New Year than with one of her favorite chocolate desserts as both a reward and I’m sure good-luck charm?

Ingredients:
1 cup milk
1 cup unsweetened Dutch cocoa powder
1/3 cup sugar
4 eggs at room temperature
2 tablespoons butter at room temperature
Pinch of salt

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and prepare a 1-quart souffle mold by lightly buttering it, dusting the insides with sugar and tapping out the excess. Place mold in refrigerator.
2. Pour the milk, cocoa powder and sugar into a heavy saucepan and stir to combine. Bring to a boil over moderate heat while stirring constantly. Reduce the heat and cook while stirring until the mixture thickens (about 10 minutes). Transfer to a bowl and cool slightly.
3. Separate the eggs and stir the egg yolks into the warm chocolate mixture. Stir in the butter.
4. Beat the egg whites until they reach soft peaks. Add the salt and beat until stiff. Whisk half of the egg whites mixture into the chocolate mixture. Fold in the remaining whites gently with a spatula. Pour the mixture in the souffle mold and smooth the top.
5. Bake in the lower-middle shelf of the oven until puff and brown for about 18 minutes which will give you a soft center. Serve at once with softly whipped cream.

Red Mullet with Spinach en Papillote
Serves 4

Ingredients:
2 teaspoons olive oil
8 fillets of red mullet, about 2 ounces each
1 lb. spinach, washed and dried in a salad spinner
4 teaspoons shallots, peeled and sliced
8 slices of lime
4 tablespoons of creme fraiche
Salt and freshly ground pepper

1. Cut 4 pieces of parchment paper (or aluminum foil) into squares large enough to cover each fillet and leave a 2-inch border all around. Lightly brush the squares with olive oil. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
2. Put the spinach in the center of each square and top it with a tablespoon of creme fraiche. Top with two fillets and add one teaspoon of shallots, two slices of lime. Season with salt and pepper.
3. Fold up the edges to form packets. Put the papillotes on a baking sheet and bake for 10-15 minutes. Serve at once by setting each papillote on a plate.
N.B. You can use sole or snapper instead of red mullet

Pappardelle with Spring Veggies
Serves 4

Ingredients:
12 ounces pappardelle
1 lb. green asparagus
2 cups fresh peas, shelled
2 tablespoons of shallots, peeled and minced
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 cup of pine nuts, toasted
1 cup freshly grated parmesan
1 cup roughly chopped parsley
Coarse sea salt and freshly ground pepper

1. Cut off end of asparagus and blanch in salted water until just tender (about 5 minutes). Blanch peas separately for about 1 minute.
2. In a heavy saucepan, gently saute the shallots in olive oil until they begin to turn gold. Add peas and asparagus and cook for a few minutes.
3. Cook the pappardelle in boiling water, drain and pour into saucepan. Add pine nuts, parmesan and parsley and season to taste. Serve immediately.

Croque aux Poires
Serves 4

Ingredients:
4 slices of brioche
2 ripe pears
2 tablespoons of sliced almonds
2 tablespoons of honey
1 tablespoon butter
1. Peel the pears and cut into small cubes. Melt butter in a saucepan and saute the pear cubes for 2-3 minutes.
2. Arrange pear cubes on brioche slices. Cover with honey and almonds. Put under broiler for two minutes watching carefully. Serve warm with a dollop of sour cream or creme fraiche.
A yummy dessert also wonderful for a weekend breakfast or brunch.










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Week 7 - I Love French Pastries




Week 7 - I Love French Pastries





The Theme for our 52 weeks of 2011 group this week is Love.....

Anyone that knows me will know that I love food - nice food best of all. One of my favorite places is the La Cigalle French Market on a Saturday or Sunday morning - for years you could be assured to find me there on a Saturday morning. Unfortunately all the gorgeous french cheeses, saucisons, and french pastries was not very good for my waistline, so since embarking on my "get fit and healthy" 5 months ago I have not been visiting on a Saturday morning. In it's place I catch up with my personal trainer for 90mins of healthy exercise in the gym (well so he tells me - and to be fair the results tend to agree)

The result is that I have now lost 25kgs (55lbs) - one of my healthy eating options is Blueberries - and I know from previous years that the "blueberry farmer" comes up from Rotorua this time of the year with the freshest BB's - so the past two weeks I have popped in on my way home from the gym to pick some up......

Well yesterday morning I picked something else up as well - yep - a little treat as a reward for reaching one of my milestones (even though they tell you not to reward yourself with food) - well I needed a shot for this weeks theme did I not!! And then I had to wait until today to get my shot - and then eat it!!

Well - the next one will most probably only be another 5 months away so I enjoyed every mouth full!!
And just as a little bonus - a very quick out take of the Blueberries - I do love them as well!!











212 365 Feeling Great, Celebrate




212 365 Feeling Great, Celebrate





I had a good day at work, then went swimming. The combination of swimming and my healthy diet make me feel great. Then a friend of mine had some great news about a project he had been working on for the past year, so I am going out with him to celebrate.

Drinking some fresh apple juice Cate made with a juicer and it tastes great!









french healthy eating








french healthy eating




The Fat Fallacy: The French Diet Secrets to Permanent Weight Loss






Fat is not the enemy!


Croissants. Brioche. Brie. To the American palate, these foods are fattening and oftentimes “forbidden.” Yet they are the regular staples of the French diet. And though almost half of all Americans are overweight, France’s obesity rate is at a low eight percent, while the French also boast fewer cases of stroke and heart disease. It’s clear that America’s obsession with low-fat and fat-free foods has ultimately failed.
In The Fat Fallacy, neuroscientist Will Clower explains precisely why the American diet sabotages weight-loss efforts and discusses how French eating habits can lead to better health and trimmer physiques. In this revolutionary work, Dr. Clower explains:

• How highly processed “fake foods” are the real culprit in the American diet
• Why it’s not just what you eat but how you eat that makes a difference
• Easy ways to adopt the habits of the French to melt the pounds away, including
complete dinner recipes—with dessert!

Finally, here’s a plan that cuts through the high-protein/low-fat debate. It’s not a gimmicky diet program but a way of life that will invite Americans to enjoy food like never before—while being healthier and trimmer than they ever could have imagined.










See also:

healthy eating healthy living

fried chicken wings calories

low carb ingredients

how many calories in a medium apple

how many calories in a deviled egg

calorie counting tips

pumpkin bread recipe low fat

healthy eating at work

calorie counter for chinese food

how many calories in swiss cheese




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