BAKING IN FLOWER POTS

četvrtak, 20.10.2011.

WHOLESALE FLOWERS NEW YORK CITY : WHOLESALE FLOWERS NEW


Wholesale Flowers New York City : Centaury Bach Flower : Chinas Flowers.



Wholesale Flowers New York City





 flowers new york city






    york city
  • York City Football Club is an English football club based in York, North Yorkshire. The club participates in the Conference National, the fifth tier of English football. Founded in 1922, they joined the Football League in 1929, and have spent most of their history in the lower divisions.






  • the selling of goods to merchants; usually in large quantities for resale to consumers

  • at a price; "I can sell it to you "

  • Sell (goods) in large quantities at low prices to be retailed by others

  • sweeping: ignoring distinctions; "sweeping generalizations"; " destruction"





    flowers
  • (flower) reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts

  • Induce (a plant) to produce flowers

  • (of a plant) Produce flowers; bloom

  • (flower) bloom: produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed"

  • (flower) a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms

  • Be in or reach an optimum stage of development; develop fully and richly











St. Luke's Episcopal Church




St. Luke's Episcopal Church





Hamilton Heights, West Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

In addition to its fine residential architecture, the District has three handsome churches which delineate its boundaries. The earliest, St. Luke's Episcopal Church, was built in 1852-95 and was originally meant to replace St. Luke's in Greenwich Village. This magnificent structure, massive in scale and volume, was designed by Robert Robertson, one of Manhattan's leading church architects. He was an associate of the distinguished architect William Appleton Potter, and he also designed St. Martin's Church in the Mount Morris Park Historic District. St. Luke's, entered near the corner of 141st Street and Convent Avenue, is one of the most impressive Romanesque Revival churches in the City.

Over the past four centuries, Hamilton Heights has had a succession of names, all referring to its elevated geographic position. Under Dutch rule the area was known as Jochem Pietersen's Hills, and later, under the British, Harlem Heights. During the siege of Manhattan in 1776, General George Washington retreated to Harlem Heights for several weeks, establishing his headquarters at the present location of West 161st Street and Edgecombe Avenue. Following several skirmishes with British troops, some of which occurred within the boundaries of the Historic District, the Continental Army evacuated to White Plains.

Alexander Hamilton, who served under General Washington during the battles of Harlem Heights and White Plains, acquired a 32-acre tract in Harlem Heights in August 1800. At the center of his property, near the present intersection of West 144th Street and Convent Avenue, he commissioned a 12-room Federal-style mansion (a designated New York City Landmark) as well as various out-buildings from the prominent New York architect John McComb, Jr. Although Hamilton occupied the house for fewer than four years, the building (moved two blocks south in 1889) and neighborhood that surrounds it, remains closely associated with this American patriot.

Hamilton Heights retained its rural character until the mid-1880s when a cable car railway began operating on Tenth (now Amsterdam) Avenue between West 125th and 155th Streets. During this period, William H. De Forest, a silk merchant and real estate speculator, acquired much of the former Hamilton property. In 1886 he created a restrictive covenant limiting future construction to "brick or stone dwelling houses at least two stories in height." One exception was made, along 10th Avenue, where both apartment buildings and commercial storefronts were permitted beside the railway. To spur development in accordance with his plan, De Forest's son,

William De Forest, Jr., commissioned the architect Harvey L. Page to design an apartment building and four adjoining townhouses in the Queen Anne style at the southwest corner of Tenth (now Amsterdam) Avenue and West 144th Street. This pattern was maintained throughout the district, with mostly three-story residences along the numbered streets, Convent Avenue, and Hamilton Terrace; and a continuous row of mainly six-story apartments on the east side of Amsterdam Avenue, extending from West 140th Street to 145th Street. In several instances, a unified urban ensemble was created in which the corner apartments and the adjacent townhouses were designed by the same architects, including designs by such residential specialists as Clarence True and Neville & Bagge.

Throughout the first decade of the twentieth century, Hamilton Heights retained its character as small-scale residential district. In 1906 the neighborhood's last group of single-family homes was built on the north side of West 141st Street, between Convent and Amsterdam Avenue. During the decade that followed, DeForest's restrictions expired and a group of apartment buildings, some as tall as ten stories, were erected along Convent Avenue and Hamilton Terrace, increasing the neighborhood's scale and density. This second wave of urbanization is also recognized in the Hamilton Heights Historic District Extension, including such neo-Renaissance style apartment houses as Nos. 61 and 75 Hamilton Terrace, the Sadivian Arms, and No. 270 Convent Avenue. Architects active in the design of these and other later buildings in the extension include: Neville & Bagge, Frank L. Norton, and Schwartz & Gross. With unbroken rows of handsome townhouses, contemporaneous apartment buildings and religious structures, Hamilton Heights is one of the city's most architecturally distinctive enclaves.

The early history of the area'

Throughout the first half of the seventeenth century the West India Company encouraged the development of New Netherland2 through generous land grants to settlers. While many preferred the security and convenience of Manhattan's fortified southern tip, called New Amsterdam, a small number chose to establish farms in the island's wooded north. Among these early pioneers was forty-











West 144th Street




West 144th Street





Hamilton Heights, Harlem, Manhattan

Over the past four centuries, Hamilton Heights has had a succession of names, all referring to its elevated geographic position. Under Dutch rule the area was known as Jochem Pietersen's Hills, and later, under the British, Harlem Heights. During the siege of Manhattan in 1776, General George Washington retreated to Harlem Heights for several weeks, establishing his headquarters at the present location of West 161st Street and Edgecombe Avenue. Following several skirmishes with British troops, some of which occurred within the boundaries of the Historic District, the Continental Army evacuated to White Plains.

Alexander Hamilton, who served under General Washington during the battles of Harlem Heights and White Plains, acquired a 32-acre tract in Harlem Heights in August 1800. At the center of his property, near the present intersection of West 144th Street and Convent Avenue, he commissioned a 12-room Federal-style mansion (a designated New York City Landmark) as well as various out-buildings from the prominent New York architect John McComb, Jr. Although Hamilton occupied the house for fewer than four years, the building (moved two blocks south in 1889) and neighborhood that surrounds it, remains closely associated with this American patriot.

Hamilton Heights retained its rural character until the mid-1880s when a cable car railway began operating on Tenth (now Amsterdam) Avenue between West 125th and 155th Streets. During this period, William H. De Forest, a silk merchant and real estate speculator, acquired much of the former Hamilton property. In 1886 he created a restrictive covenant limiting future construction to "brick or stone dwelling houses at least two stories in height." One exception was made, along 10th Avenue, where both apartment buildings and commercial storefronts were permitted beside the railway. To spur development in accordance with his plan, De Forest's son,

William De Forest, Jr., commissioned the architect Harvey L. Page to design an apartment building and four adjoining townhouses in the Queen Anne style at the southwest corner of Tenth (now Amsterdam) Avenue and West 144th Street. This pattern was maintained throughout the district, with mostly three-story residences along the numbered streets, Convent Avenue, and Hamilton Terrace; and a continuous row of mainly six-story apartments on the east side of Amsterdam Avenue, extending from West 140th Street to 145th Street. In several instances, a unified urban ensemble was created in which the corner apartments and the adjacent townhouses were designed by the same architects, including designs by such residential specialists as Clarence True and Neville & Bagge.

Throughout the first decade of the twentieth century, Hamilton Heights retained its character as small-scale residential district. In 1906 the neighborhood's last group of single-family homes was built on the north side of West 141st Street, between Convent and Amsterdam Avenue. During the decade that followed, DeForest's restrictions expired and a group of apartment buildings, some as tall as ten stories, were erected along Convent Avenue and Hamilton Terrace, increasing the neighborhood's scale and density. This second wave of urbanization is also recognized in the Hamilton Heights Historic District Extension, including such neo-Renaissance style apartment houses as Nos. 61 and 75 Hamilton Terrace, the Sadivian Arms, and No. 270 Convent Avenue. Architects active in the design of these and other later buildings in the extension include: Neville & Bagge, Frank L. Norton, and Schwartz & Gross. With unbroken rows of handsome townhouses, contemporaneous apartment buildings and religious structures, Hamilton Heights is one of the city's most architecturally distinctive enclaves.

The early history of the area'

Throughout the first half of the seventeenth century the West India Company encouraged the development of New Netherland2 through generous land grants to settlers. While many preferred the security and convenience of Manhattan's fortified southern tip, called New Amsterdam, a small number chose to establish farms in the island's wooded north. Among these early pioneers was forty-two year old Captain Jochem Pietersen Kuyter, who in 1639 received a four hundred acre land grant in recognition of past military service in the East Indies for King Christian IV.3 Kuyter's property stretched across the island from what is now 122nd Street on the East River to 145th Street on the Hudson River. While he developed the rich flat parcels to the southeast as a plantation, the elevated grounds on the west, later known as "Jochem Pietersen's Hills," remained uninhabited.

Life in Manhattan's rural north proved difficult for Kuyter and his wife Leentie Martensie. A "blazing arrow" was said to have destroyed their thatch-roofed farmhouse in 1644, and during the decade that followed both were murdered during









 flowers new york city







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