AWNING WINDOW HINGES

21.10.2011., petak

WHITE TWIN CANOPY BED. WHITE TWIN


White Twin Canopy Bed. Hv30 Rolling Shutter.



White Twin Canopy Bed





white twin canopy bed






    canopy bed
  • A bed supported by four tall posts with a cross members joining the posts that may be used for a supporting a fabric canopy cover, swags, curtains, etc. Find bedroom furniture.

  • Canopy beds are beds decorated with a canopy. Sometimes they use four posts that are connected at the top with rails that fabric can be hung from. Other times, a hoop is hung from the ceiling over the bed and the fabric drapes down from the hoop.

  • A canopy bed is a decorative bed somewhat similar to a four poster bed. A typical canopy bed usually features posts at each of the four corners extending four feet high or more above the mattress.





    white
  • Paint or turn (something) white

  • whiten: turn white; "This detergent will whiten your laundry"

  • a member of the Caucasoid race

  • being of the achromatic color of maximum lightness; having little or no hue owing to reflection of almost all incident light; "as white as fresh snow"; "a bride's white dress"





    twin
  • duplicate or match; "The polished surface twinned his face and chest in reverse"

  • Link; combine

  • duplicate: being two identical

  • either of two offspring born at the same time from the same pregnancy











Pano Rochester Creek panel




Pano Rochester Creek panel





Five photo pano of Rochester Creek rock art panel.

The Rochester Creek rock art panel near Emery, Utah consists of mostly petroglyphs, some in the Fremont style (700-1300 AD). The Fremont culture was contemporaneous with the Anasazi.

This panel clearly has some Fremont petroglyphs as well as more modern "rock art and grafitti". Ute Indians may have produced some. A few experts feel there are some much older Barrier Canyon style figures at this location.

The white strip you see along the top of the panel is likely "rock art" that has been chipped off and stolen in more modern (and many ways - pathetic, times).
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Basics: Petroglyphs were "pecked" into a rock surface. Pictographs were "painted" onto a rock surface.

Some of the pictographs found in Utah are over 3,000 years old. The paint the native American used to make many of the Colorado Plateau pictographs consisted of ground hematite mixed with animal fat and and bird eggs. The paint was absorbed into the sandstone matrix and when protected from the elements (and morons - modern vandals); have lasted thousands of years.

Dating petroglyphs can be tricky, even for trained scientists, who many times must depend on "style" and other clues associated with the rock art to date the rock art. Pictographs have the advantage of having organic materials used in their creation, which may aid dating.

NOTE: If you have a deep interest in rock art (pictographs and petroglyphs) of the American Southwest then get the excellent book titled: "Legacy on Stone" by Sally J. Cole. This is not "page turner" reading and gets pretty technical at times, but if you want some well researched facts and information on the rock art and their presumed creators, then get her book.
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We drove through the night from our home in Eastern Washington to downtown - - Emery, Utah.

I always fill up with gas whenever wandering around back country roads, so I stopped at Emery to fill up our pickup truck and to ask some questions about the points of interest we wanted to visit. I have heard that some men don't like asking for directions or information, but I'm not one of them. I learn a LOT from asking local folks, who know the area, for the latest hiking, sight seeing, and travel information.

I met a really nice couple, who ran the small store and gas station at Emery. They confirmed our planned travel plans to reach the trailhead for the Rochester Creek rock art panel hike.

I casually asked about how rough the road might be from Moore to I-70 (Called the Moore Cutoff Road locally), and was astonished to hear that it was now paved and you could whisk along at 55 mph. This was good news, since the Head of Sinbad rock art panel was going to be our next destination that afternoon. It was also where we hoped we could "car camp".

The couple handed me a pamphet titled: "San Rafael Country" which had a nice map, photos, and up to date information on the points of interest in the area. See: [www.sanrafaelcountry.com]

We welcomed the warm weather to hike in and we both enjoyed the hike and the pictographs and petroglyphs of the area. It is always fun to try to get inside the mind of the "artist" who created the rock art, hundreds and many cases, thousands, of years ago.
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Road Trip - Utah April 17th - 24th, 2010: My wife and I headed for Southern Utah, just before midnight on Friday the 16th of April (after she got off work at her part time job). We drove straight through to Southern Utah, to take advantage of the good weather forecast early on in our trip. Storms were forecast for later in the trip and in fact we got a pretty good taste of same on Wednesday the 21st.

Here in outline form are the places we visited and hiked:

Saturday 4.17.2010
> Rochester Rock Art Panel near Emery, Utah
> The Moore cutoff road
> Sinbad’s head pictograph panel (we camped under a pinon pine near here)

Sunday 4.18.2010
> Black Dragon Canyon rock art panel (after first taking the wrong turn and doing some interesting four wheel drive travel way up the San Rafael River). Short hike.
> Pictograph Canyon pictographs. Short but interesting hike.
> Drive Hanksville, Torrey, Boulder, to Escalante (check into motel)

Monday 4.19.2010
> Drive out the Hole In The Rock Road. Visit Devil’s Garden and Metate Arch.
> Drive to Dry Fork of Coyote Gulch. Hike down to Peek-a-boo and Spooky slot canyons. I hiked the loop up Peek-a-boo and down Spooky while my wife hiked with another lady hiker up Dry Fork and then down to the bottom of Spooky.

Tuesday 4.20.2010
> Hike Lower Calf Creek Falls (my third hike here and my wife’s second) and scramble up to two sets of pictograph panels.

Wednesday 4.21.2010
> Drive the Burr Trail road from Boulder to Notom (my fourth time on this scenic rou











Locomotive Point cliffs




Locomotive Point cliffs





Like so much of Southern Utah, the canyon and cliff walls of various sandstone formations, make for tremendous natural beauty. These cliffs were near the Head of Sinbad panel pictographs we wanted to see.

After we completed our hike to the Rochester Creek rock art panel, we drove the Moore Cutoff road to I-70. It had been a long day and we hoped to get as close as we could to the “Head of Sinbad” pictograph panels, where we wanted to camp for the night in the back of our pickup truck.

I had all kinds of maps and copies from various guide books, along with the pamphlet the folks at the Emery, Utah gas station had given me. Still I wanted to make sure we would head in the right direction so we wouldn’t waste valuable “road trip” find, by getting lost in the wide open desert country of the San Rafael Swell.

We took exit 131 off I-70. I had traveled the Temple Mt. road to Goblin Valley in the past, and this looked like the “shortest” way into Locomotive Point and the Head of Sinbad panels. The BLM map on the information board on the south side of I-70 cinched it. It clearly showed the turns I needed to make and the BLM road numbers I would take to get to our destination. It was getting late in the day so we headed down the dirt road, making a right at the proper place and then we came to the “culvert” passage that would take us back under I-70, heading north.

The dirt road was easy up to this point, but the “rock ramp” built up by off road enthusiasts to get through one of the two big culvert passages looked like it required due care and caution. Once under the interstate the sandy route to Locomotive Point was a pleasure to travel.

We visited the two panel areas. I am going to give them some names so I can refer to them more easily in this narrative. The Head of Sinbad panels face south and are little more than a mile north of I-70. In fact, now that I know where they are, I will be able to easily pick the area out, when driving I-70 between Green River, Utah and Fremont Junction.

The Head of Sinbad “west panel” was disappointing. The heads were missing for the entire row of pictographs. What I have read is that these 3,000 year old pictographs have not been vandalized, yet to me, it looked as though the missing upper portion of the pictographs - - didn’t look natural (if so, the heads should be laying on the ground, below where they fell - -they weren’t).

Next we drove over to the Head of Sinbad “West panel”. This was what we had come to see and it was impressive. There are two sets of figures on at the West panel and they are not far apart. Though the day was almost gone, we spent time staring up at these intriguing pictographs and taking photographs.

Next we drove west then north on a very sandy four wheel drive track until we found a side road leading up to a sandstone cliff sheltered camping spot, under a large pinon pine tree. Here we slept the night under a black desert sky filled with brilliant white stars. Wonderful!

Early the next morning, while my wife organized our traveling gear I clambered up the steep sides of the surrounding sandstone to get some “dawn” photos of the area we had camped. After leaving camp we opted to skip visiting the nearby arch and get back to the West panel of the pictographs, to have the area to ourselves and get some photos with the early morning light. This we did.

After retracing our route back to I-70 we headed east bound for the Black Dragon panel and for a hike up nearby Petroglyph Canyon.
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Road Trip - Utah April 17th - 24th, 2010: My wife and I headed for Southern Utah, just before midnight on Friday the 16th of April (after she got off work at her part time job). We drove straight through to Southern Utah, to take advantage of the good weather forecast early on in our trip. Storms were forecast for later in the trip and in fact we got a pretty good taste of same on Wednesday the 21st.

Here in outline form are the places we visited and hiked:

Saturday 4.17.2010
> Rochester Rock Art Panel near Emery, Utah
> The Moore cutoff road
> Sinbad’s head pictograph panel (we camped under a pinon pine near here)

Sunday 4.18.2010
> Black Dragon Canyon rock art panel (after first taking the wrong turn and doing some interesting four wheel drive travel way up the San Rafael River). Short hike.
> Pictograph Canyon pictographs. Short but interesting hike.
> Drive Hanksville, Torrey, Boulder, to Escalante (check into motel)

Monday 4.19.2010
> Drive out the Hole In The Rock Road. Visit Devil’s Garden and Metate Arch.
> Drive to Dry Fork of Coyote Gulch. Hike down to Peek-a-boo and Spooky slot canyons. I hiked the loop up Peek-a-boo and down Spooky while my wife hiked with another lady hiker up Dry Fork and then down to the bottom of Spooky.

Tuesday 4.20.2010
> Hike Lower Calf Creek Falls (my third hike here and my wife’s second) and scramble up to two sets of pictograph panels.









white twin canopy bed







See also:

third eye blinds new album

homemade lamp shade

shades for sliding glass doors

awning dometic

rv awnings parts

roll down sun shades

bamboo shades blinds

replacement blinds

roman shades 36




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