AUTOMATIC WINDOW BLINDS

petak, 21.10.2011.

NORMAN WOOD SHUTTERS - WOOD SHUTTERS


NORMAN WOOD SHUTTERS - CORDLESS SHADES SALE - WOOD AWNING WINDOW.



Norman Wood Shutters





norman wood shutters














norman wood shutters - Golf at




Golf at the Top with Steve Williams: Tips and Techniques from the Caddy to Raymond Floyd, Greg Norman, and Tiger Woods


Golf at the Top with Steve Williams: Tips and Techniques from the Caddy to Raymond Floyd, Greg Norman, and Tiger Woods



?I recommend this book to anyone who wants to explore their true and full potential as a golfer.”
--TIGER WOODS, from the Foreword

During tournament play, when winning or losing is on the line, Steve Williams is the only person on the course with Tiger Woods?advising and guiding him. Now, Golf at the Top with Steve Williams offers an exclusive insider look at the methods, secrets and big tournament moments of golf’s most successful caddy.
With more than 100 tournament wins to his credit, Steve Williams walked the fairways with Raymond Floyd and Greg Norman when they were capturing PGA tournaments. He was there when Tiger Woods swept four Major titles in a row and continues to help the world’s number one golfer stay at the top. The insights and techniques revealed in Golf at the Top with Steve Williams come from these experiences. They are sure to improve your play and cut strokes off your score.










83% (15)





Pillboxes at Tilty, Essex




Pillboxes at Tilty, Essex





Tilty is a small hamlet north west of Great Dunmow, Essex. It has a parish church and the remains of a medieval abbey. It also has two World War Two pillboxes - one of which is a rare surviving camouflaged pillbox - it was built inside a barn. The other is in the corner of a field on the approach road from Broxted.

The one near the road is in poor condition with its bricks extensively spalled and broken by frost. Amazingly the pillbox inside the barn is in MINT condition. Its brickwork looks so fresh it could have been built yesterday. The barn pillbox is adjacent to the derelict Tilty watermill and can be found by following the footpath from the church car park. Unlike many pillboxes its entrance has not been sealed. When I looked inside it contained a brass bedend! [see above]

***

The British countryside is still dotted with hundreds of brick or concrete structures called pillboxes. While traditionally associated with WW2 and the dark days of the 1940/1941 invasion threat, some actually date from the First World War and were re-activated and restored for the Second World War.

In his book 'Pillboxes' newspaper photographer Henry Wills relates that the first British pillboxes were built along the East Coast in the First World War after fears that the Germans could stage a sneak invasion across the North Sea and land around 100,000 troops on the coast at a selected point.

As pillboxes had already been encountered in Flanders [built by the Germans] the British were sufficiently impressed to build circular ones in Norfolk and Suffolk and the more familiar hexagonal ones along the Thames and Medway estuaries. Some faced inland to protect ports from inland attack. It was the circular version which inspired the name 'pillbox'

Following the Fall of France in 1940, General Sir Edmund Ironside was put in charge of home defence. Visiting King's Lynn and Cromer he noted the considerable effort made to place barbed wire there but said there was a great failure to realise that nodal points should be fitted with blockhouses to prevent enemy columns from rushing inland. In his diary he noted: "It is stupid to repair roads, trim hedges and grass, when pillboxes are needed".

He set in train a major construction programme using civilian contractors.

Initial plans were for a 'crust' of coastal pillboxes to cover beaches and impede landings, followed by inland road blocks at defiles manned by the Home Guard and finally extended defence lines running across country for miles to try to contain a German penetration. The GHQ Line was just such an inland creation although it was never as extensive as the Maginot Line or Siegfried Line.

Basic design of pillboxes varied and there were further local variations to account for available materials and manpower. Some concrete ones were shuttered with wood, others were shuttered with corrugated iron. Some had a brick skin [see above] or concrete block skin into which the liquid concrete was poured. Most were civilian-built as the army was needed to train and re-equip following Dunkirk.

Ancient monuments were included. Dover Castle still has an anti-tank gun emplacement cut into its medieval walls. Pevensey Castle has several pillboxes built into Roman or Norman walls. Bromholme Abbey at Bacton, in Norfolk, has a massive pillbox built into medieval material. One pillbox was even built in Parliament Square, London, where it was camouflaged as a news vendor's stand. A couple of pill boxes still survive overlooking Pall Mall in central London.

Other variations included revolving concrete turrets [Tett Turrets] and the revolving steel Alan-Williams turret.

Henry Wills' book 'Pillboxes' [ISBN 0-436-57360-1] contains much detail and extensively researched national maps showing current surviving pillboxes but many have been lost. Some pillboxes, in Northumberland, are now listed buildings. At Pevensey Castle one pillbox was demolished because it blocked the road but all the rest were retained and preserved as they were seen as the latest stage in the castle's defensive history.

In addition to Wills [and published more recently] is Silent Sentinels, by Christopher Bird, [ISBN 0 948400 81 1] published by Larks Press of Dereham, Norfolk [tel: 01328 829207]. This second is a county guide to Norfolk only but includes Ordnance Survey map references and many photos. It also covers dragons' teeth and other obstacles.











Pillboxes at Tilty, Essex




Pillboxes at Tilty, Essex





Tilty is a small hamlet north west of Great Dunmow, Essex. It has a parish church and the remains of a medieval abbey. It also has two World War Two pillboxes - one of which is a rare surviving camouflaged pillbox - it was built inside a barn. The other is in the corner of a field on the approach road from Broxted [see above].

The one near the road is in poor condition with its bricks extensively spalled and broken by frost. Amazingly the pillbox inside the barn is in MINT condition. Its brickwork looks so fresh it could have been built yesterday. The barn pillbox is adjacent to the derelict Tilty watermill and can be found by following the footpath from the church car park. Unlike many pillboxes its entrance has not been sealed. When I looked inside it contained a brass bedend!

***

The British countryside is still dotted with hundreds of brick or concrete structures called pillboxes. While traditionally associated with WW2 and the dark days of the 1940/1941 invasion threat, some actually date from the First World War and were re-activated and restored for the Second World War.

In his book 'Pillboxes' newspaper photographer Henry Wills relates that the first British pillboxes were built along the East Coast in the First World War after fears that the Germans could stage a sneak invasion across the North Sea and land around 100,000 troops on the coast at a selected point.

As pillboxes had already been encountered in Flanders [built by the Germans] the British were sufficiently impressed to build circular ones in Norfolk and Suffolk and the more familiar hexagonal ones along the Thames and Medway estuaries. Some faced inland to protect ports from inland attack. It was the circular version which inspired the name 'pillbox'

Following the Fall of France in 1940, General Sir Edmund Ironside was put in charge of home defence. Visiting King's Lynn and Cromer he noted the considerable effort made to place barbed wire there but said there was a great failure to realise that nodal points should be fitted with blockhouses to prevent enemy columns from rushing inland. In his diary he noted: "It is stupid to repair roads, trim hedges and grass, when pillboxes are needed".

He set in train a major construction programme using civilian contractors.

Initial plans were for a 'crust' of coastal pillboxes to cover beaches and impede landings, followed by inland road blocks at defiles manned by the Home Guard and finally extended defence lines running across country for miles to try to contain a German penetration. The GHQ Line was just such an inland creation although it was never as extensive as the Maginot Line or Siegfried Line.

Basic design of pillboxes varied and there were further local variations to account for available materials and manpower. Some concrete ones were shuttered with wood, others were shuttered with corrugated iron. Some had a brick skin [see above] or concrete block skin into which the liquid concrete was poured. Most were civilian-built as the army was needed to train and re-equip following Dunkirk.

Ancient monuments were included. Dover Castle still has an anti-tank gun emplacement cut into its medieval walls. Pevensey Castle has several pillboxes built into Roman or Norman walls. Bromholme Abbey at Bacton, in Norfolk, has a massive pillbox built into medieval material. One pillbox was even built in Parliament Square, London, where it was camouflaged as a news vendor's stand. A couple of pill boxes still survive overlooking Pall Mall in central London.

Other variations included revolving concrete turrets [Tett Turrets] and the revolving steel Alan-Williams turret.

Henry Wills' book 'Pillboxes' [ISBN 0-436-57360-1] contains much detail and extensively researched national maps showing current surviving pillboxes but many have been lost. Some pillboxes, in Northumberland, are now listed buildings. At Pevensey Castle one pillbox was demolished because it blocked the road but all the rest were retained and preserved as they were seen as the latest stage in the castle's defensive history.

In addition to Wills [and published more recently] is Silent Sentinels, by Christopher Bird, [ISBN 0 948400 81 1] published by Larks Press of Dereham, Norfolk [tel: 01328 829207]. This second is a county guide to Norfolk only but includes Ordnance Survey map references and many photos. It also covers dragons' teeth and other obstacles.









norman wood shutters








norman wood shutters




The white side of a black subject: a vindication of the Afro-American race, from the landing of slaves at St. Augustine, Florida, in 1565, to the present time






This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.










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