27.10.2011., četvrtak

AUSTRALIAN LIGHT HORSE EQUIPMENT : AUSTRALIAN LIGHT


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Australian Light Horse Equipment





australian light horse equipment






    light horse
  • Horse, other than a heavy horse or a pony, that is suitable for riding.

  • As opposed to heavy horses (draft horses), light horses are the average riding horse and includes many different breeds.





    australian
  • (australia) a nation occupying the whole of the Australian continent; Aboriginal tribes are thought to have migrated from southeastern Asia 20,000 years ago; first Europeans were British convicts sent there as a penal colony

  • a native or inhabitant of Australia

  • A native or national of Australia, or a person of Australian descent

  • of or relating to or characteristic of Australia or its inhabitants or its languages; "Australian deserts"; "Australian aborigines"





    equipment
  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.

  • The necessary items for a particular purpose

  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items

  • Mental resources

  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service

  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.











australian light horse equipment - Light-Horse Harry




Light-Horse Harry Lee and the Legacy of the American Revolution


Light-Horse Harry Lee and the Legacy of the American Revolution



Soldier, statesman, landowner, historian of the young republic, and member of one of the best Virginian families - Henry Lee endeavoured throughout his life to realise his dream of a free and prosperous America. His career embodied the visionary promises that inspired the American Revolution, as well as the inability of the revolutionary generation to put all its ideals into practice. Charles Royster shows how, both during the war and afterward, Lee continually risked himself in the service of his vision and how he repeatedly failed to win the victories he sought. This book was first published in 1981 by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., and has already won wide critical acclaim. It will appeal to general readers as well as students of American history.










83% (17)





Be'er Sheva, Ottoman cavalry parade




Be'er Sheva, Ottoman cavalry parade





Picture taken by a German photographer probably 1916 who was attached to German Flying Detachment 300 (Fliegerabteilung 300), part of the German Expeditionary Corps (Asienkorps). The picture probably shows a parade for Jemal Pasha during his inspection before the second advance against the Suez Canal on the central square.

Here is some background history:
Human settlement in the area date from the Copper Age. The region has probably been inhabited since the 4th millennium BC. The city has been destroyed and rebuilt many times over the centuries.
Israelites founded the city of Be’er Sheva during the 10th century BC after the land was conquered by King David (Tel Be’er Sheva). The site was probably chosen due to the abundance of water. According to the Bible, the wells were dug by Abraham and Issac. Be’er Sheva is mentioned several times in the Bible. Tel Be’er Sheva is part of the Israeli UNESCO World Heritage sites.
Following the Babylonian conquest and subsequent enslavement of many Israelites, the town was abandoned but resettled after the slaves returned from Babylon.
During the Roman and later Byzantine periods, the town served as a front-line defense against Nabatean attacks. The last inhabitants of Tel Be'er-Sheva were the Byzantines, who abandoned the city during the Arab conquest of Palestine in the 7th century.

The Ottomans, who had controlled Palestine since the 16th century, took no interest in Be’er Sheva until the end of the 19th century. At the beginning of the 19th century, Be’er Sheva was portrayed by European pilgrims as a barren stretch of land with a well and a handful of Bedouins living nearby. Towards the end of the 19th century, the Ottomans built a police station in Be’er Sheva.
A town plan was created by a Swiss and a German architect with a grid street pattern. Most of the residents at the time were Arabs from Hebron and the Gaza area, although Jews also began settling in the city.

In Autumn 1914, the Germans and Ottoman planned an advance against the Suez canal under Ottoman commander Ali Fuad Bey and German chief of staff of the Ottoman VIII. Army Kress von Kressenstein. Be’er Sheva was chosen as main back area for the German and Ottoman troops due to its abundance of water. The supply for the troops had to be transported from Damascus via Nablus and Jerusalem on camel caravans which was absolutely insufficient. By early October 1914 there was no road existing to connect Jerusalem with Be’er Sheva. In January 1915, the German-Ottoman military headquarter for the Suez expedition was estabilshed in Be’er Sheva. At about the same time, works started to build a road from Hebron to Be’er Sheva in order to improve infrastructure and supply problems. Further, in January 1915, the Ottomans built a military railroad from the Hejaz line (connection Afula/Sileh to Dera’a) to Be’er Sheva.

The first expedition against the Suez canal started on January 15 until February 13, 1915. The mixed German-Ottoman troops of approx. 25.000 men reached the canal but were not able to hold their positions mainly due to insufficient supply. Afterwards, a new expedition was planned and preparations were made. The railway was extended until Be’er Sheva and the train station was inaugurated on October 30, 1915. The celebration was attended by the Turkish army commander Jemal (Djemal) Pasha. The line was later extended to Hafir el Auja. By January 1916, the Ottomans had errected army repairshops. Earlier, all major repairs had to be made in Jaffa or Jerusalem. Further, a hospital was build in Be’er Sheva where 10 Kaiserwerth deaconesses were working. Two German nurses were working in the soldier’s home in the city. In March 1916 Enver Pasha was visiting the troops in Be’er Sheva and he used the occasion to inaugurate the new train station in Asluj.

In April 1916, the German flying detachment (Fliegerabteilung) 300 arrived in Be’er Sheva and in mid April an Austrian/Hungarian artillery division. Both units were inspected by Jemal Pasha in end of May 1916. An airfield was build in Be’er sheva which was already attacked by British planes in June 1916. On Juli 4, the Austrian/German and Ottoman troops left Be’er Sheva for El Arish as collecting point for the second advance against the Suez canal. The attack started on August 3 with approx. 16.000 men and lasted until August 14 (Battle of Romani).

The Allied forces with superior material and supply gained more and more ground (conquering Sinai). Due to the Allied pressure, El Arish was abandoned in Mid December 1916 and the German planes were removed from Be’er Sheva to Ramle in January 1917. The Allied started to attack Gaza in February 1917. In order to stabilize the front, Kressenstein draw its remaining troops from the Sinai back to Be’er Sheva in March 1917. Be’er Sheva was considered the gate to Jerusalem. By September 1917, more and more troops were stationed in Be’er Sheva such as the 3rd Ottoman Cavalry Division and the 27th Infantry Division under











Be'er Sheva, aerial photograph




Be'er Sheva, aerial photograph





Picture taken by a German photographer probably 1915/1916 attached to German Flying Detachment 300 (Fliegerabteilung 300), part of the German Expeditionary Corps (Asienkorps).

Here is some background history:
Human settlement in the area date from the Copper Age. The region has probably been inhabited since the 4th millennium BC. The city has been destroyed and rebuilt many times over the centuries.
Israelites founded the city of Be’er Sheva during the 10th century BC after the land was conquered by King David (Tel Be’er Sheva). The site was probably chosen due to the abundance of water. According to the Bible, the wells were dug by Abraham and Issac. Be’er Sheva is mentioned several times in the Bible. Tel Be’er Sheva is part of the Israeli UNESCO World Heritage sites.
Following the Babylonian conquest and subsequent enslavement of many Israelites, the town was abandoned but resettled after the slaves returned from Babylon.
During the Roman and later Byzantine periods, the town served as a front-line defense against Nabatean attacks. The last inhabitants of Tel Be'er-Sheva were the Byzantines, who abandoned the city during the Arab conquest of Palestine in the 7th century.

The Ottomans, who had controlled Palestine since the 16th century, took no interest in Be’er Sheva until the end of the 19th century. At the beginning of the 19th century, Be’er Sheva was portrayed by European pilgrims as a barren stretch of land with a well and a handful of Bedouins living nearby. Towards the end of the 19th century, the Ottomans built a police station in Be’er Sheva.
A town plan was created by a Swiss and a German architect with a grid street pattern. Most of the residents at the time were Arabs from Hebron and the Gaza area, although Jews also began settling in the city.

In Autumn 1914, the Germans and Ottoman planned an advance against the Suez canal under Ottoman commander Ali Fuad Bey and German chief of staff of the Ottoman VIII. Army Kress von Kressenstein. Be’er Sheva was chosen as main back area for the German and Ottoman troops due to its abundance of water. The supply for the troops had to be transported from Damascus via Nablus and Jerusalem on camel caravans which was absolutely insufficient. By early October 1914 there was no road existing to connect Jerusalem with Be’er Sheva. In January 1915, the German-Ottoman military headquarter for the Suez expedition was estabilshed in Be’er Sheva. At about the same time, works started to build a road from Hebron to Be’er Sheva in order to improve infrastructure and supply problems. Further, in January 1915, the Ottomans built a military railroad from the Hejaz line (connection Afula/Sileh to Dera’a) to Be’er Sheva.

The first expedition against the Suez canal started on January 15 until February 13, 1915. The mixed German-Ottoman troops of approx. 25.000 men reached the canal but were not able to hold their positions mainly due to insufficient supply. Afterwards, a new expedition was planned and preparations were made. The railway was extended until Be’er Sheva and the train station was inaugurated on October 30, 1915. The celebration was attended by the Turkish army commander Jemal (Djemal) Pasha. The line was later extended to Hafir el Auja. By January 1916, the Ottomans had errected army repairshops. Earlier, all major repairs had to be made in Jaffa or Jerusalem. Further, a hospital was build in Be’er Sheva where 10 Kaiserwerth deaconesses were working. Two German nurses were working in the soldier’s home in the city. In March 1916 Enver Pasha was visiting the troops in Be’er Sheva and he used the occasion to inaugurate the new train station in Asluj.

In April 1916, the German flying detachment (Fliegerabteilung) 300 arrived in Be’er Sheva and in mid April an Austrian/Hungarian artillery division. Both units were inspected by Jemal Pasha in end of May 1916. An airfield was build in Be’er sheva which was already attacked by British planes in June 1916. On Juli 4, the Austrian/German and Ottoman troops left Be’er Sheva for El Arish as collecting point for the second advance against the Suez canal. The attack started on August 3 with approx. 16.000 men and lasted until August 14 (Battle of Romani).

The Allied forces with superior material and supply gained more and more ground (conquering Sinai). Due to the Allied pressure, El Arish was abandoned in Mid December 1916 and the German planes were removed from Be’er Sheva to Ramle in January 1917. The Allied started to attack Gaza in February 1917. In order to stabilize the front, Kressenstein draw its remaining troops from the Sinai back to Be’er Sheva in March 1917. Be’er Sheva was considered the gate to Jerusalem. By September 1917, more and more troops were stationed in Be’er Sheva such as the 3rd Ottoman Cavalry Division and the 27th Infantry Division under Colonel Ibrahim Bey enforced by the 1st Regt. of the 16th Division with 3 batteries and parts of the 24th Division. The defence of Be’er Sheva was coo









australian light horse equipment








australian light horse equipment




The Lighthorsemen (Import)






Brand new DVD produced in Hong Kong. NTSC format. Plays on North American DVD players. This DVD is produced in NTSC only in Asia. Excellent picture quality. Full screen 4:3 ratio. In original English with optional Chinese and English subtitles can be turned off. On screen menus are in English and Chinese and are easy to use. Director: Simon Wincer. Cast: Jon Blake, Peter Phelps, Tony Bonner, Bill Kerr, John Walton, Sigrid Thorton. The following review was written for the VHS release: One of the great cavalry charges in history, September 16, 2005 Reviewer: Patrick J. McNamara (New York) - If you liked "Gallipoli" and "Breaker Morant," you should try this movie. A friend recommended it, and though it's a bit hard to find, it's worth the search. Like "Gallipoli," its focus is on an idealistic young man who volunteers to fight in World War I as part of the Lighthorsemen, an Australian cavalry unit that served in the Middle East . Along the way, he meets a young British nurse and they fall in love. In the meanwhile, the Lighthorsemen are ordered to attack an enemy fortress in the middle of the desert. Based on a real incident, the cavalry charge on Beersheba in 1917 was among the last in history, and it was a success. That charge is the highlight of this movie, and it is marvelously done! It's every bit as good, and as stirring, as the one in "The Charge of the Light Brigade" in 1936. Unlike Gallipoli, this movie is not a downer. It has a happy ending, proving that even if World War I was a depressing moment in world history, not all World War I movies have to be depressing. Recommended!










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