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27.10.2011., četvrtak

SAFETY EQUIPMENT INSTITUTE. EQUIPMENT INSTITUTE


SAFETY EQUIPMENT INSTITUTE. FARM EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING. FITNESS EQUIPMENT CANADA ONLINE.



Safety Equipment Institute





safety equipment institute






    safety equipment institute
  • The Safety Equipment Institute (SEI) is a private, non-profit organization established to administer non-governmental, third-party certification programs to test and certify a broad range of safety and protective products.











safety equipment institute - Safety of




Safety of Silicone Breast Implants


Safety of Silicone Breast Implants



The Dow Corning case raised serious questions about the safety of silicone breast implants and about larger issues of medical device testing and patient education. "Safety of Silicone Breast Implants" presents a well-documented, thoughtful exploration of the safety of these devices, drawing conclusions from the available research base and sesting further questions to be answered. This book also examines the sensitive issues surrounding women's decisions about implants. In reaching conclusions, the committee reviews: the history of the silicone breast implant and the development of its chemistry; the wide variety of U.S.-made implants and their regulation by the Food and Drug Administration; frequency and consequences of local complications from implants; the evidence for and against links between implants and autoimmune disorders, connective tissue disease, neurological problems, silicone in breast milk, or a proposed new syndrome; and evidence that implants may be associated with lower frequencies of breast cancer. "Safety of Silicone Breast Implants" provides a comprehensive, well-organized review of the science behind one of the most significant medical controversies of our time.










75% (14)





CCSeniorAwarenessDay




CCSeniorAwarenessDay





Seniors, their families, professionals and other members of the community gathered in Warren and Clinton counties on June 15 to promote the safety and well-being of older adults.

More than 250 people turned out at events at the Clinton County Senior Center and Franklin's Atrium Family YMCA to learn about elder abuse prevention, dementia and safe aging, frauds and scams, fall prevention, community safety and more. Free screenings for blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, hearing, balance and osteoporosis were also available.
News from COA and the Aging Network
Scripps, AARP urge spending reform for Medicaid long-term care
Ohio can save a bundle on Medicaid spending and rein in health care costs if seniors and disabled adults have more options for home and community-based care, according to the Scripps Center for Gerontology and the AARP Public Policy Institute.

Ohio spends 72 percent of its Medicaid long-term care funding on costly nursing home care and only 28 percent for less expensive home and community-based care ~ Scripps Gerontology Center, Miami University
A Scripps report released in May said if Ohio continues on its course of long-term care spending, Medicaid could consume half of the state's budget by 2020.

Ohio spends 72 percent of its Medicaid long-term care funding on costly nursing home care and only 28 percent for less expensive home and community-based care, the report said. Medicaid nursing home care costs Ohio taxpayers three to four times as must as home and community-based options that offer the same level of care.

Ohio's aging network has made headway on its advocacy to move the state toward a unified long-term care budget. Ohio has moved up slightly in the rankings of states that spend more in institutional vs. home and community-based care, but remains among the bottom ten.

A unified long-term care budget would use Medicaid dollars flexibly to provide services based on consumer choice and need in both nursing facilities and home and community-based settings. The Ohio Department of Aging recommends that Ohio strive to achieve a 50/50 balance between institutional and home care by 2013.

On a national level, the AARP Public Policy Institute noted in June that states investing in more cost-effective home and community-based services slow their rate of Medicaid spending growth over time, compared to states that rely primarily on nursing homes.

Ohio is no exception. According to Scripps, 12 years ago, Ohio began investing in Medicaid home and community-based services. Had the state not done that, taxpayers would have spent $190 million more on long-term care and served 6,100 fewer people between 1995 and 2007 (most recent data available).

Ohio's reforms represent "the first steps of a longer journey," the Scripps report concludes. "Ohio has little choice but to continue to address these issues."

[back to top]
COA and partners help more than 4,200 seniors with DTV transition
Digital TV finally arrived on June 12, but not without some static. After almost two years of warnings from the federal government and local broadcasters, many people were still not prepared when analog signals were shut off.

The Digital TV Transition left many area seniors confused and in need of help.
Seniors across the country were particularly hard hit. While most were aware the transition was coming, many were unsure how it would affect them or what they needed to do. Others could not afford to purchase new equipment for their homes, and those who could were having difficulties installing and operating it.

Council on Aging and its partners joined in a nationwide effort to help seniors prepare for the digital TV transition. In our five-county area, the effort provided phone and in-home assistance to more than 4,200 older adults.

Through a grant from the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (N4A), COA participated in the Digital TV: Keeping Seniors Connected campaign. Help was available before and after the June 12 transition date.

"For most of us, it's a minor inconvenience if our TV goes out for a few days," said Chris Brand, whose Community Resources & Information Department at COA led the digital TV effort. "But for seniors who are isolated and homebound, the TV is often their only companion during the day. Without out it, they're in the dark."

As part of the campaign, COA distributed information to seniors through care managers, senior centers, home-delivered meal providers and congregate meal sites. COA also worked with WCPO to develop and distribute a public service announcement targeting older adults.

Key issues for older adults included purchasing and installing the digital TV converter box. To help, COA distributed donated converter box coupons and digital TV equipment. Local Best Buy and RadioShack stores donated converter boxes that were installed in seniors' homes in partnership with People Working Cooperatively and Cincinnati-Hamilton C











safety equipment institute








safety equipment institute




Handbook for Dust Control in Mining






This handbook describes effective methods for the control of mineral dusts in mines and tunnels. It assumes the reader is familiar with mining. The first chapter deals solely with dust control methods, regardless of the application. It is a brief tutorial on mining dust control and will be of help to the reader whose dust control problem does not conveniently fit any of the mining equipment niches described in later chapters.

The subsequent chapters describe dust control methods for different kinds of mines and mining equipment. This includes underground coal and hard-rock mines, as well as surface mines, stone mines, and hard-rock tunnels. Because dust sampling has so many pitfalls, a chapter on methods used to sample dust is included. For those occasions when there is no practical engineering control, a chapter on respirators is also included.

Except for those listed as "future possibilities" in the longwall chapter, the dust control methods described are practical and cost-effective for most mine operators.

If controlling dust were a simple matter, dust problems in tunnels and mines would have been eradicated years ago. Unfortunately, most underground dust control methods yield only 25% to 50% reductions in respirable-sized dust. Often, 25% to 50% reductions are not enough to achieve compliance with dust standards. Thus, mine operators must use several methods simultaneously, usually without knowing for sure how well any individual method is working. In fact, given a 25% error in dust sampling and day-to-day variations in dust generation of 50% or more, certainty about which control methods are most effective can be wanting. Nevertheless, over the years, some consensus has emerged on the best dust control practices. This handbook summarizes those practices.

This handbook describes effective methods for the control of mineral dusts in mines and tunnels. It assumes the reader is familiar with mining. The first chapter deals solely with dust control methods, regardless of the application. It is a brief tutorial on mining dust control and will be of help to the reader whose dust control problem does not conveniently fit any of the mining equipment niches described in later chapters.

The subsequent chapters describe dust control methods for different kinds of mines and mining equipment. This includes underground coal and hard-rock mines, as well as surface mines, stone mines, and hard-rock tunnels. Because dust sampling has so many pitfalls, a chapter on methods used to sample dust is included. For those occasions when there is no practical engineering control, a chapter on respirators is also included.

Except for those listed as "future possibilities" in the longwall chapter, the dust control methods described are practical and cost-effective for most mine operators.

If controlling dust were a simple matter, dust problems in tunnels and mines would have been eradicated years ago. Unfortunately, most underground dust control methods yield only 25% to 50% reductions in respirable-sized dust. Often, 25% to 50% reductions are not enough to achieve compliance with dust standards. Thus, mine operators must use several methods simultaneously, usually without knowing for sure how well any individual method is working. In fact, given a 25% error in dust sampling and day-to-day variations in dust generation of 50% or more, certainty about which control methods are most effective can be wanting. Nevertheless, over the years, some consensus has emerged on the best dust control practices. This handbook summarizes those practices.










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