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FLIGHTS NEW ZEALAND TO AUSTRALIA - FLIGHTS NEW ZEALAND


Flights New Zealand To Australia - India Flight Reservations.



Flights New Zealand To Australia





flights new zealand to australia






    new zealand
  • an independent country within the British Commonwealth; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1907; known for sheep and spectacular scenery

  • The New Zealand's national Australian rules football team, nicknamed the Falcons are selected from the best New Zealand born and developed players, primarily from the clubs of the New Zealand AFL.

  • An island country in the South Pacific Ocean about 1,200 miles (1,900 km) east of Australia; pop. 3,990,000; capital, Wellington; languages, English (official) and Maori

  • North Island and South Island and adjacent small islands in the South Pacific





    australia
  • (australian) of or relating to or characteristic of Australia or its inhabitants or its languages; "Australian deserts"; "Australian aborigines"

  • An island country and continent in the southern hemisphere, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, a member state of the Commonwealth of Nations; pop. 19,900,000; capital, Canberra; official language, English

  • a nation occupying the whole of the Australian continent; Aboriginal tribes are thought to have migrated from southeastern Asia 20,000 years ago; first Europeans were British convicts sent there as a penal colony

  • the smallest continent; between the South Pacific and the Indian Ocean





    flights
  • (in soccer, cricket, etc.) Deliver (a ball) with well-judged trajectory and pace

  • (flight) shoot a bird in flight

  • Shoot (wildfowl) in flight

  • (flight) fly in a flock; "flighting wild geese"

  • (flight) an instance of traveling by air; "flying was still an exciting adventure for him"











flights new zealand to australia - Flying Too




Flying Too High (Phryne Fisher Mysteries)


Flying Too High (Phryne Fisher Mysteries)



The second in the classic Phryne Fisher series from Kerry Greenwood, featuring the irresistible heroine Phryne. Whether shes foiling kidnappers, seducing beautiful young men or simply deciding what to wear for dinner, Phryne handles everything with her inimitable panache and flair.
Danger, excitement and love--this is how the glamorous Phryne Fisher is determined to live her life in her second enticing adventure.

Walking the wings of a Tiger Moth plane in full flight ought to be enough excitement for most people, but not Phryne Fisher, amateur detective, woman of mystery, as delectable as the finest chocolate and as sharp as razor blades.

In this, the second Phryne Fisher mystery, the 1920s' most talented and glamorous detective flies even higher, handling a murder, a kidnapping and the usual array of beautiful young men with style and consummate ease--and all before it's time to adjourn to the Queenscliff Hotel for breakfast. Whether she's flying planes, clearing a friend of homicide charges or saving a child from kidnapping, she handles everything with the same dash and elan with which she drives her red Hispano-Suiza.










76% (10)





Pihoihoi - New Zealand pipit – Anthus novaeseelandiae




Pihoihoi - New Zealand pipit – Anthus novaeseelandiae





Photographed on the Wellington coast just north of Plimmerton.
The New Zealand pipit, sometimes inaccurately called ground lark or native lark, is a local race (Anthus novaeseelandiae novaeseelandiae) of a very widely distributed species that occurs in Australia, the East Indies, North Africa, and Europe. It breeds on almost all the islands in the New Zealand area except the Kermadecs, the Snares, and Macquarie Island. Within its range the bird is found in a variety of open-country habitats from sea level to above the snow line, and is generally to be seen in such places as sand dunes, shingly river beds, and tussock grasslands. It is one of those birds that originally benefited, both in numbers and in distribution, from the progress of settlement. However increased use of pesticides, introduced mammalian predatorsand magpies, mayhave pushed this species into decline and it has disappeared from some former strongholds. Competition from the simialr introduced skylark has been discounted as the birds have quite different diets and co-exist seemingly without detriment to either species, in a number of areas.
Males and females look alike. The upper parts are brown, streaked with darker brown; the breast is buff and mottled with brown, and the belly is white. A dark line runs through the eye and the two outermost tail feathers are mainly white and show up clearly when the bird is in flight. Though superficially rather like the introduced skylark, the pipit is more slender in body, has a longer, finer bill, lacks any head crest, and is much paler in plumage. Behaviour is different from that of the skylark – the tail is flicked while the bird is on the ground, and the flight is usually undulating instead of the soaring and singing so characteristic of the skylark.
Breeding takes place from September to March and up to three broods may be raised by a pair in a season. About four eggs freckled with light brown and grey are laid in a well-concealed cup-shaped nest made of grass. This is placed on the ground and usually beneath growing vegetation. Incubation takes about two weeks. Small flocks may form in autumn. The pipit is mainly insectivorous, but also eats worms and small seeds. In spite of its small size the species was eaten by the old-time Maori.
In spring the male will soar and sing a short trill as he descends, but this song cannot be confused with that of the skylark. The common call is a high, slurred “tirr-eep” or “peepit” and it is from this that the species gets its common name.
The pipit and the skylark both have drab plumage to provide camouflage on the ground but the pipit is grey rather than buff coloured and has a distinctive white eyebrow. The skylark has a tuft or crest on its head whilst the pipit has a habit of flicking its tail when it walks. It is also a much bolder bird and has the typical characteristic of our endemics in that it seems unafraid of humans, whereas the skylark keeps its distance. Its call is quite harsh.
The pipit feeds almost exclusively on insects and small invertebrates and this exclusive diet may be the reason why the pipit’s numbers have declined in favour of the skylark with the increasing use of pesticides on farms. The skylark is more of a seed eater.
The breeding habits of the birds are similar, with some pairs remaining on their territory all year and breeding together year after year. The females build the nest which is a neat grass lined cup in a small depression in the ground, often concealed by an overhanging clump of grass.
The pipit was first identified for the scientific record at Queen Charlotte Sound during Captain James Cook’s second voyage by Forster, where it was noticed on the seashore feeding on small crustacea among the seaweed caste up by the waves.











Pihoihoi - New Zealand pipit – Anthus novaeseelandiae




Pihoihoi - New Zealand pipit – Anthus novaeseelandiae





Photographed on Kapiti Island.
The New Zealand pipit, sometimes inaccurately called ground lark or native lark, is a local race (Anthus novaeseelandiae novaeseelandiae) of a very widely distributed species that occurs in Australia, the East Indies, North Africa, and Europe. It breeds on almost all the islands in the New Zealand area except the Kermadecs, the Snares, and Macquarie Island. Within its range the bird is found in a variety of open-country habitats from sea level to above the snow line, and is generally to be seen in such places as sand dunes, shingly river beds, and tussock grasslands. It is one of those birds that has benefited, both in numbers and in distribution, from the progress of settlement.
Males and females look alike. The upper parts are brown, streaked with darker brown; the breast is buff and mottled with brown, and the belly is white. A dark line runs through the eye and the two outermost tail feathers are mainly white and show up clearly when the bird is in flight. Though superficially rather like the introduced skylark, the pipit is more slender in body, has a longer, finer bill, lacks any head crest, and is much paler in plumage. Behaviour is different from that of the skylark – the tail is flicked while the bird is on the ground, and the flight is usually undulating instead of the soaring and singing so characteristic of the skylark.
Breeding takes place from September to March and up to three broods may be raised by a pair in a season. About four eggs freckled with light brown and grey are laid in a well-concealed cup-shaped nest made of grass. This is placed on the ground and usually beneath growing vegetation. Incubation takes about two weeks. Small flocks may form in autumn. The pipit is mainly insectivorous, but also eats worms and small seeds. In spite of its small size the species was eaten by the old-time Maori.
In spring the male will soar and sing a short trill as he descends, but this song cannot be confused with that of the skylark. The common call is a high, slurred “tirr-eep” or “peepit” and it is from this that the species gets its common name.
The pipit and the skylark both have drab plumage to provide camouflage on the ground but the pipit is grey rather than buff coloured and has a distinctive white eyebrow. The skylark has a tuft or crest on its head whilst the pipit has a habit of flicking its tail when it walks. It is also a much bolder bird and has the typical characteristic of our endemics in that it seems unafraid of humans, whereas the skylark keeps its distance. Its call is quite harsh.
The pipit feeds almost exclusively on insects and small invertebrates and this exclusive diet may be the reason why the pipit’s numbers have declined in favour of the skylark with the increasing use of pesticides on farms. The skylark is more of a seed eater.
The breeding habits of the birds are similar, with some pairs remaining on their territory all year and breeding together year after year. The females build the nest which is a neat grass lined cup in a small depression in the ground, often concealed by an overhanging clump of grass.
The pipit was first identified for the scientific record at Queen Charlotte Sound during Captain James Cook’s second voyage by Forster, where it was noticed on the seashore feeding on small crustacea among the seaweed caste up by the waves.









flights new zealand to australia







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