AIR TRAVEL CHEAP FLIGHTS

07.10.2011., petak

FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR POSITION. INSTRUCTOR POSITION


Flight instructor position. Cheap air flights to. Flight voucher.



Flight Instructor Position





flight instructor position






    flight instructor
  • A flight instructor is a person who teaches others to fly aircraft. Specific privileges granted to holders of a flight instructor qualification vary from country to country, but very generally, a flight instructor serves to enhance or evaluate the knowledge and skill level of an aviator in

  • Der Timenbuilder mit less den 1000 Hrs Multienginefliegen. Teachen Dummkopfs to Fliegen vile Waitenwatchen fur der Letter mit der Joboffering von United





    position
  • military position: a point occupied by troops for tactical reasons

  • cause to be in an appropriate place, state, or relation

  • A place where someone or something is located or has been put

  • A place where part of a military force is posted for strategic purposes

  • the particular portion of space occupied by something; "he put the lamp back in its place"

  • The location where someone or something should be; the correct place











flight instructor position - Aviation Instructor's




Aviation Instructor's Handbook


Aviation Instructor's Handbook



The official FAA Guide—an essential reference for all instructors.
The Aviation Instructor’s Handbook is a world-class educational reference tool developed and designed for ground instructors, flight instructors, and aviation maintenance instructors. This information-packed handbook provides the foundation for beginning instructors to understand and apply the fundamentals of instructing. It also provides aviation instructors with detailed, up-to-date information on learning and teaching, and how to relate this information to the task of conveying aeronautical knowledge and skills to students. Experienced aviation instructors will also find the new and updated information useful for improving their effectiveness in training activities.

No aviation instructor’s library is complete without the up-to-date Aviation Instructor’s Handbook. 100 b&w illustrations










75% (17)





Messerschmitt Me 262A-2a Schwalbe (Swallow)




Messerschmitt Me 262A-2a Schwalbe (Swallow)





The Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe ("Swallow") was the world's first operational jet-powered fighter aircraft.[5] Design work started before World War II began, but engine problems prevented the aircraft from attaining operational status until mid-1944. Compared with Allied fighters of its day, including the jet-powered Gloster Meteor, it was much faster and better armed.
In combat, when properly flown, it proved difficult to counter due to its speed. Me 262 pilots claimed a total of 509 Allied kills (although higher claims are sometimes made)[Notes 1] against the loss of about 100 Me 262s.[citation needed] The design was pressed into a variety of roles, including light bomber, reconnaissance and even experimental night fighter versions.
The Me 262 is considered to have been the most advanced German aviation design in operational use during World War II.The Allies countered its potential effectiveness in the air by relentlessly attacking the aircraft on the ground, or while they were taking off or landing. Maintenance during the deteriorating war situation and a lack of fuel also reduced the effectiveness of the aircraft as a fighting force. In the end, the Me 262 had a negligible impact on the course of the war due to its late introduction and the small numbers that were deployed in operational service.
The Me 262 influenced the designs of post-war aircraft such as the North American F-86 and Boeing B-47.
n April 1944, Erprobungskommando 262 was formed at Lechfeld in Bavaria as a test unit (Jager Erprobungskommando Thierfelder)[3] to introduce the 262 into service and train a core of pilots to fly it. On 26 July 1944, Leutnant Alfred Schreiber with the 262 A-1a W.Nr. 130 017 damaged a Mosquito reconnaissance aircraft of No. 540 Squadron RAF PR Squadron, which was allegedly lost in a crash landing upon landing at an air base in Italy.[22] Other sources state the aircraft was damaged during evasive manoeuvres and escaped.[23] It was the first victory for a turbojet fighter aircraft in aviation history.[24] Major Walter Nowotny was assigned as commander after the death of Werner Thierfelder in July 1944, and the unit redesignated Kommando Nowotny. Essentially a trials and development unit, it holds the distinction of having mounted the world's first jet fighter operations. Trials continued slowly, with initial operational missions against the Allies in August 1944 allegedly downing 19 Allied aircraft for six Me 262s lost, although these claims have never been verified by cross-checking with USAAF records. The RAF Museum holds no intelligence reports of RAF aircraft engaging in combat with Me 262s in August, although there is a report of an unarmed encounter between an Me 262 and a Mosquito.Despite orders to stay grounded, Nowotny chose to fly a mission against an enemy bomber formation flying some 30,000 feet above, on 8 November 1944. He claimed two P-51Ds destroyed before suffering engine failure at high altitude. Then, while diving and trying desperately to restart his engines, he was attacked and forced to bale out by other Mustangs. Some US historians proposed that Nowotny's victor was P-51D pilot Lt Robert W Stevens of the 364thFGAccording to other sources, he was shot down and killed by First Lieutenant Edward "Buddy" Haydon of the 357th Fighter Group, USAAF and Captain Ernest "Feeb" Fiebelkorn of the 20th Fighter Group, USAAF.
Actually, the exact circumstances surrounding the end of Walter Nowotny remain uncertain to this day. It is also possible that he was hit by "friendly" flak. The Kommando was then withdrawn for further training and a revision of combat tactics to optimise the 262's strengths.By January 1945, Jagdgeschwader 7 (JG 7) had been formed as a pure jet fighter wing, although it would be several weeks before it was operational. In the meantime, a bomber unit — I Gruppe, Kampfgeschwader 54 (KG 54) — had re-equipped with the Me 262 A-2a fighter-bomber for use in a ground-attack role. However, the unit lost 12 jets in action in two weeks for minimal returns.Jagdverband 44 (JV 44) was another Me 262 fighter unit, of Staffel (squadron) size given the low numbers of available personnel, formed in February 1945 by Lieutenant General Adolf Galland, who had recently been dismissed as Inspector of Fighters. Galland was able to draw into the unit many of the most experienced and decorated Luftwaffe fighter pilots from other units grounded by lack of fuel.
During March, Me 262 fighter units were able, for the first time, to mount large scale attacks on Allied bomber formations. On 18 March 1945, 37 Me 262s of JG 7 intercepted a force of 1,221 bombers and 632 escorting fighters. They shot down 12 bombers and one fighter for the loss of three Me 262s. Although a 4:1 ratio was exactly what the Luftwaffe would have needed to make an impact on the war, the absolute scale of their success was minor, as it represented only one per cent of the attacking force. In 1943











Aero L-29




Aero L-29





The Aero L-29 Delfin (English: Dolphin, NATO reporting name: Maya) is a military jet trainer aircraft that became the standard jet trainer for the air forces of Warsaw Pact nations in the 1960s. It was Czechoslovakia's first locally designed and built jet aircraft.

In the late 1950s, the Soviet Air Force was seeking a jet-powered replacement for its fleet of piston-engined trainers, and this requirement was soon broadened to finding a trainer aircraft that could be adopted in common by Eastern Bloc air forces. Aero's response, the prototype XL-29 designed by Z. Rublic and K. Tomas first flew on 5 April 1959, powered by a British Bristol Siddeley Viper engine. The second prototype was powered by the Czech-designed M701 engine, which was used in all subsequent aircraft.

The basic design concept was to produce a straightfoward, easy-to-build and operate aircraft. Simplicity and redness were stressed with manual flight controls, large flaps and the incorporation of perforated airbrakes on the fuselage sides providing stable and docile flight characteristics, leading to an enviable safety record for the type. The sturdy L-29 was able to operate from grass, sand or unprepared fields. Both student pilot and instructor had ejection seats, and were positioned in tandem, under separate canopies with a slightly raised instructor position.

In 1961, the L-29 was evaluated against the PZL TS-11 Iskra and Yakovlev Yak-30 and emerged the winner. Poland chose to pursue the development of the TS-11 Iskra anyway, but all other Warsaw Pact countries adopted the Delfin under the agreements of COMECON.

Production began April 1963 and continued for 11 years, with 3,500 eventually built. A dedicated, single-seat, aerobatic version was developed as the L-29A Akrobat. A reconnaissance version with nose-mounted cameras was built as the L-29R.

The Delfin served in basic, intermediate and weapons training roles. For this latter mission, they were equipped with hardpoints to carry gunpods, bombs or rockets, and thus armed, Egyptian L-29s were sent into combat against Israeli tanks during the Yom Kippur War. The L-29 was supplanted in the inventory of many of its operators by the Aero L-39 Albatros. More than 2,000 L-29s were supplied to the Soviet Air Force, acquiring the NATO reporting name "Maya."

As a trainer, the L-29 enabled air forces to adopt an "all-through" training on jet aircraft, replacing earlier piston-engined types.

On July 16th, 1975, a Czechoslovakian Air Force L-29 shot down a Polish civilian biplane piloted by Dionizy Bielanski that was attempting to defect to the West.

On October 2, 2007, an unmodified L-29 was used for the world’s first jet flight powered solely by 100% biodiesel fuel. Pilots Carol Sugars and Douglas Rodante flew their Delphin Jet at Stead Airport, Reno, Nevada in order to promote environmentally friendly fuels in aviation.

Between September 10-14, 2008, two L-29s took first and second at the Reno Air Races. Both L-29s consistently posted laps at or above 500 miles per hour. Former Astronaut Curt Brown took first in "Viper," followed by Red Bull Racer Mike Mangold in "Euroburner."

Russia says it destroyed 2 Georgian L-29s during the 2008 South Ossetia war.

General characteristics

* Crew: 2: student and instructor
* Length: 10.81 m (35 ft 5? in)
* Wingspan: 10.29 m (33 ft 9 in)
* Height: 3.13 m (10 ft 3 in)
* Wing area: 19.8 m? (213 ft?)
* Empty weight: 2,280 kg (5,027 lb)
* Loaded weight: 3,280 kg (7,231 lb)
* Max takeoff weight: 3,540 kg (7,804 lb)
* Powerplant: 1? Motorlet M-701C 500 turbojet, 8.7 kN (1,960 lbf)

Performance

* Never exceed speed: 820 km/h (442 knots, 510 mph)
* Maximum speed: 655 km/hr (353 knots, 407 mph) at 5,000 m (16,400 ft)
* Stall speed: 130 km/h (71 knots, 81 mph) flaps down
* Range: 894 km (480 nmi, 555 mi) with tip tanks
* Endurance: 2 hours 30 min
* Service ceiling: 11,000 m (36,100 ft)
* Rate of climb: 14.0 m/s (2,755 ft/min)

Armament

* 200 kg (440 lb) of various guns, bombs, rockets, and missiles on external hardpoints











flight instructor position








flight instructor position




Aviation Instructor's Handbook on Kindle






Aviation Instructor's Handbook: Designed for ground instructors, flight instructors, and aviation maintenance instructors, the Aviation Instructor’s Handbook was developed by the Flight Standards Service, Airman Testing Standards Branch, in cooperation with aviation educators and industry to help beginning instructors understand and apply the fundamentals of instruction. This handbook provides aviation instructors with up-to-date information on learning and teaching, and how to relate this information to the task of teaching aeronautical knowledge and skills to students. Experienced aviation instructors will also find the updated information useful for improving their effectiveness in training activities. Chapters include: Human Behavior; The Learning Process; Effective Communication; The Teaching Process; Planning Instructional Activity; Assessment; Instructor Responsibilities and Professionalism; Techniques of Flight Instruction; Risk Management; Appendix: References; Developing a Test Item Bank; Certificates, Ratings, and Endorsements; Personal Minimums Checklist; Flight Instructor Endorsements; Relationships of Decision-Making Models; Glossary; Index

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency of the United States Department of Transportation with authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. (National Airworthiness Authority). The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the group under the name "Federal Aviation Agency", and adopted its current name in 1967 when it became a part of the United States Department of Transportation. The Federal Aviation Administration's major roles include: Regulating U.S. commercial space transportation. Regulating air navigation facilities' geometry and Flight inspection standards. Encouraging and developing civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology. Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilot certificates. Regulating civil aviation to promote safety, especially through local offices called Flight Standards District Offices. Developing and operating a system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil and military aircraft. Researching and developing the National Airspace System and civil aeronautics. Developing and carrying out programs to control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civil aviation.

Aviation Instructor's Handbook: Designed for ground instructors, flight instructors, and aviation maintenance instructors, the Aviation Instructor’s Handbook was developed by the Flight Standards Service, Airman Testing Standards Branch, in cooperation with aviation educators and industry to help beginning instructors understand and apply the fundamentals of instruction. This handbook provides aviation instructors with up-to-date information on learning and teaching, and how to relate this information to the task of teaching aeronautical knowledge and skills to students. Experienced aviation instructors will also find the updated information useful for improving their effectiveness in training activities. Chapters include: Human Behavior; The Learning Process; Effective Communication; The Teaching Process; Planning Instructional Activity; Assessment; Instructor Responsibilities and Professionalism; Techniques of Flight Instruction; Risk Management; Appendix: References; Developing a Test Item Bank; Certificates, Ratings, and Endorsements; Personal Minimums Checklist; Flight Instructor Endorsements; Relationships of Decision-Making Models; Glossary; Index

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency of the United States Department of Transportation with authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. (National Airworthiness Authority). The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the group under the name "Federal Aviation Agency", and adopted its current name in 1967 when it became a part of the United States Department of Transportation. The Federal Aviation Administration's major roles include: Regulating U.S. commercial space transportation. Regulating air navigation facilities' geometry and Flight inspection standards. Encouraging and developing civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology. Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilot certificates. Regulating civil aviation to promote safety, especially through local offices called Flight Standards District Offices. Developing and operating a system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil and military aircraft. Researching and developing the National Airspace System and civil aeronautics. Developing and carrying out programs to control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civil aviation.










See also:

airfare to moscow

airline tickets under 200

air india ticket cancellation

free online flight simulations

best flights to brazil

multiple city flight search

cheap flight germany

a 2 flight leather bomber jacket

flight club wiki

top flight travel




- 17:06 - Komentari (0) - Isprintaj - #

<< Arhiva >>

  listopad, 2011  
P U S Č P S N
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31            

Listopad 2011 (19)

Dnevnik.hr
Gol.hr
Zadovoljna.hr
OYO.hr
NovaTV.hr
DomaTV.hr
Mojamini.tv

AIR TRAVEL CHEAP FLIGHTS

Linkovi