AIR INDIA FLIGHT STATUS 144

petak, 07.10.2011.

LAST EPISODE OF FLIGHT 29 DOWN. LAST EPISODE OF


LAST EPISODE OF FLIGHT 29 DOWN. FLIGHT IN THE AIR.



Last Episode Of Flight 29 Down





last episode of flight 29 down






    last episode
  • A series finale refers to the last installment of a television series. In many Commonwealth countries, the term final episode is commonly used. These terms refer to an intentionally planned ending, rather than one in which the series is unexpectedly cancelled after the last episode is produced.





    flight
  • an instance of traveling by air; "flying was still an exciting adventure for him"

  • (in soccer, cricket, etc.) Deliver (a ball) with well-judged trajectory and pace

  • a formation of aircraft in flight

  • Shoot (wildfowl) in flight

  • shoot a bird in flight





    29
  • Year 29 (XXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

  • twenty-nine: the cardinal number that is the sum of twenty-eight and one

  • 29 is Ryan Adams' eighth official album, and his third album released in 2005 (although the preceding two were credited to Ryan Adams and The Cardinals). The album was produced by Ethan Johns, who also produced Heartbreaker and Gold.











Etna at Dawn-Catania-Italy - Creative Commons by gnuckx




Etna at Dawn-Catania-Italy - Creative Commons by gnuckx





Mount Etna
Mount Etna, also known as Muncibe??u in Sicilian and Mongibello in Italian, a combination of Latin mons and Arabic gibel, both meaning mountain) is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania. Its Arabic name was Jebel Utlamat (the Mountain of Fire). It is the second largest active volcano in Europe, currently standing 3,329 metres (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions; the mountain is 21 m (69 ft) lower now than it was in 1981. It is the highest mountain in Italy south of the Alps. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km? (460 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km. This makes it by far the largest of the three active volcanoes in Italy, being about two and a half times the height of the next largest, Mount Vesuvius. Only Mount Teide in Tenerife surpasses it in the whole of the European region (though geographically Tenerife is an island of Africa).

Mount Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is in an almost constant state of eruption. It is also believed to be the world’s oldest active volcano. The fertile volcanic soils support extensive agriculture, with vineyards and orchards spread across the lower slopes of the mountain and the broad Plain of Catania to the south. Due to its history of recent activity and nearby population, Mount Etna has been designated a Decade Volcano by the United Nations.

Geological history
Volcanic activity at Etna began about half a million years ago, with eruptions occurring beneath the sea off the coastline of Sicily. 300,000 years ago, volcanism began occurring to the southwest of the present-day summit, before activity moved towards the present center 170,000 years ago. Eruptions at this time built up the first major volcanic edifice, forming a strato-volcano in alternating explosive and effusive eruptions. The growth of the mountain was occasionally interrupted by major eruptions leading to the collapse of the summit to form calderas.
Etna seen from Spot Satellite.

From about 35,000 to 15,000 years ago, Etna experienced some highly explosive eruptions, generating large pyroclastic flows which left extensive ignimbrite deposits. Ash from these eruptions has been found as far away as Rome, 800 km to the north.
A crater near the Torre del Filosofo, about 450 metres below Etna’s summit.

Thousands of years ago, the eastern flank of the mountain experienced a catastrophic collapse, generating an enormous landslide in an event similar to that seen in the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. The landslide left a large depression in the side of the volcano, known as ‘Valle del Bove’ (Valley of the Ox). Research published in 2006 sests that this occurred around 6000 BC, and caused a huge tsunami which left its mark in several places in the eastern Mediterranean. It may have been the reason that the settlement of Atlit Yam (Israel), now below sea level, was suddenly abandoned around that time.

The steep walls of the Valley have suffered subsequent collapse on numerous occasions. The strata exposed in the valley walls provide an important and easily accessible record of Etna’s eruptive history.

The most recent collapse event at the summit of Etna is thought to have occurred about 2,000 years ago, forming what is known as the Piano Caldera. This caldera has been almost entirely filled by subsequent lava eruptions, but is still visible as a distinct break in the slope of the mountain near the base of the present-day summit cone.

Historical eruptions
Eruptions of Etna are not all the same. Some occur at the summit, where there are currently (as of 2008) four distinct craters – the Northeast Crater, the Voragine, the Bocca Nuova, and the Southeast Crater. Other eruptions occur on the flanks, where there are more than 300 vents, ranging in size from small holes in the ground to large craters hundreds of meters across. Summit eruptions can be highly explosive and are extremely spectacular, but are rarely threatening for the inhabited areas around the volcano. On the contrary, flank eruptions can occur down to a few hundred meters altitude, close to or even well within the populated areas. Numerous villages and small towns lie around or on cones of past flank eruptions. Since the year 1600 A.D., there have been at least 60 flank eruptions and countless summit eruptions; nearly half of these have occurred since the start of the 20th century, and the 3rd millennium has seen five flank eruptions of Etna so far, in 2001, 2002-2003, 2004-2005,2007 and 2008.

The first known record of an eruption at Etna is that of Diodorus Siculus.

The Roman poet Virgil gave what was probably a first-hand description of an eruption in the Aeneid:
“ Portus ab accessu ventorum immotus et ingens ipse; sed horrificis iuxta tonat Aetna ruinis; interdumque atram prorumpit ad aethera nubem, turbine fumantem piceo et candente favilla, attollitque globos flammarum et sidera lambit; interdum scopulos avolsaque viscera mo











Cardew Robinson 1917 - 1992




Cardew Robinson 1917 - 1992





DOUGLAS ROBINSON was best known as a comedian for his characterisation of 'Cardew the Cad of the School'. Clad in a striped school cap with a long scarf draped about his scrawny neck, the tall, bony body with prominent teeth, once described as 'a double row of tombstones hanging out to dry', was a familiar figure of fun during the last legs of the variety theatre and the early hours of monochrome television. So popular was his schoolboy persona that he adopted his fictional name, becoming Cardew Robinson for professional purposes from the Fifties.

Robinson was born in Goodmayes, Essex, in 1917 and appeared in many of the Harrow County School concerts as a boy. Already touching six feet tall, and as skinny as a garden rake, his appearance alone was enough to win the laughs of playmates and parents. Ambitions to become a writer led him to a local newspaper job, but hardly had he learned to type when the paper closed down. Remembering the fun of performing before his schoolmates, Robinson invested in a copy of the Stage, price twopence in those pre-war days, and immediately spotted an advertisement placed by one Joe Boganny who needed recruits for his touring team of Crazy College Boys. One look at the long, lean lad with the protruding teeth was enough for Boganny, who signed him up on the spot.

Boganny's Crazy College was, as Robinson later wrote, 'a sort of downmarket Will Hay team. It consisted of Boganny himself and his dog, whose sole purpose was to walk across the stage with a false dog's head tied to its backside]' The human part of the act was Robinson, two other boys, and two dwarfs. Robinson took over from a small boy and was given the original cut-down costume to wear. 'That will look very funny on you, so you can be the comic,' said Boganny. And he was. Robinson was given one line. 'I say, you're late, where do you come from?' asked Boganny. 'You say: 'From a little place called Cookeroff,' and I hit you on top of the head and say: 'Well, you Cookeroff back again]' '

In May 1934 Robinson and the Crazy Collegians opened at the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith, dashed over to the Balham Hippodrome for two more houses, and rushed back to Hammersmith for the second house. The laughs came every time.

Following an unsavoury episode when Boganny bunked his boys out of a boarding- house window to 'scarper the letti' (do a moonlight flit) at the end of a hard week in Swansea, Robinson decided the 'legit' was more suitable a career. Enlisting with a touring repertory company, he followed a part in Peter Pan with perhaps his most macabre moment in his career, as the monster in Frankenstein. Then came the Second World War.

Joining the RAF in 1939, AC2 Douglas Robinson found himself stationed at Uxbridge, where he quickly found a place in the camp shows. It was in 1941 that Squadron Leader Ralph Reader, the producer/entertainer/songwriter who had formed the pre-war Boy Scout Gang Shows and now organised the RAF Gang Shows, arrived at RAF Uxbridge to put on a performance. Robinson seized his chance, did a working audition, and soon found himself posted to RAF Gang Show Unit Number Five. His pre-war experience now came in handy, and he was promoted to Flight-Sergeant and put in charge of the unit. They played at RAF camps all over the country, and when the 'second front' was opened up in Normandy, Unit 5 followed, eventually touring through Belgium and Holland giving concert-party entertainments on the tail-flap of their lorry. A tour of the Far East followed, including a sudden detour when the first atomic bomb was dropped on Japan.

After demob, Robinson continued his association with Ralph Reader, starring in a variety tour of the RAF Gang Show mounted by the impresario Tom Arnold. Given the chance to perform a solo act as a stand-up comic, he developed an idea he had first tried out in 1942. This was 'Cardew the Cad of the School', inspired by his own boyhood reading of the weekly maagzine the Gem.

This featured tales of St Jim's school written by the prolific Charles Hamilton under his pen-name Martin Clifford. Robinson had always enjoyed the caddish capers of Ralph Reckness Cardew, the schoolboy who was both suave and slightly sinister, and first as a rhyming monologue, then as a comedy act, eventually as a radio personality, the character began to take over his life.

Listeners to the BBC's popular Variety Bandbox responded with delight and Robinson became the programme's resident comedian for a spell, reading out a weekly bulletin of school reports: 'Here is the news from St Fanny's and this is Cardew the Cad reading it]' By 1950 the listening world numbered the headmaster Dr Jankers, the fat boy Fatty Gilbert, and the delightful Matron among its comedy favourites, although the BBC never gave him the honour of his own radio series. In 1954 Robinson formally changed his name from Douglas to Cardew, and established his catchphrase, 'This is Cardew the Cad saying Car-dew do]'

Robinson had entered films as









last episode of flight 29 down







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