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četvrtak, 27.10.2011.

CONCRETE FLOOR EXPANSION JOINTS - EXPANSION JOINTS


Concrete Floor Expansion Joints - Travertine Laminate Flooring.



Concrete Floor Expansion Joints





concrete floor expansion joints






    expansion joints
  • A joint that makes allowance for thermal expansion of the parts joined without distortion

  • An expansion joint is an assembly designed to safely absorb the heat-induced expansion and contraction of various construction materials, to absorb vibration, or to allow movement due to ground settlement or earthquakes.

  • (Expansion joint) Fibrous material (@1/2" thick) installed in and around a concrete slab to permit it to move up and down (seasonally) along the non-moving foundation wall.

  • (EXPANSION JOINT) A device used to permit a structure to expand or contract without breakage.





    concrete floor
  • We use 3500 psi concrete with fibermesh reinforcement, vapor barrier, and expansion joints.  We also offer aprons, sidewalks, and other concrete you need poured while the truck is there.











concrete floor expansion joints - Bridge Bearings




Bridge Bearings and Expansion Joints


Bridge Bearings and Expansion Joints



This guide will enable bridge ingineers to draw up design calculations and specifications for the effective installation, service and durability of bearings and expansion joints. It discusses the materials and techniques available for accommodating movement in bridges and is fully revised and updated in line wiht current codes and design practice. Bearings and expansion joints probalbly cause more difficulties fro the bridge engineer than any other part detailing and careful installation of the bearings, drainage and expansion joints. This book is written to help the practising bridge engineer to understand the principles of movement of bridge structures and to achieve sound designs, including accessibility for inspection and maintenance. The book includes over 150 detailed illustrations of joints, bearings and successful bridges around the world as well as design charts and tables. It is a revised, expanded and updated version of The Theory and Practice of Bearings and Expansion Joints for Bridges, originally written by the author and published by the Cement and Concrete Association in 1971 . David Lee has been responsible for bridge and structural design, together withe supervision of construction in many parts of the world, for the last 40 years, with the Maunsell Group of consulting engineers. He takes an active role in La Federation Internationale de la Precontrainte, winning the FIP madal in 1974, and the International Asociation of Bridge and Structural Engineering (IABSE). He is a Past President of The Institution of Sturctural Engineers and a Visiting Professor at the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, UK. He is also a Fellow of The Royal Academy of Enginering and received the CBE in 1989 for services to civil engineering.










86% (17)





City Hall




City Hall





Kansas City, Missouri - Best viewed in original size.

City Hall, located at 414 E. 12th St. in downtown Kansas City, Mo., was completed in 1937 at a cost of $5 million. It is the tallest and most obvious of three buildings in a construction program passed in 1931 by Kansas City voters. It was part of a "Ten-Year Plan" bond program offered to the public as a vision of stability, progress and faith in the future to counter the effects of the Depression. It also was tangible proof of the political effectiveness of Kansas City's Democratic machine, led by concrete company owner Tom "Boss" Pendergast.

And Harry Truman was the Presiding Judge in the county.

Comprised of 29 stories plus a 30th-story observation deck, City Hall is the third tallest building in the city. It measures 443 feet from the sidewalk at the north door to the top of the building. Since it's on a hill, it dominates the downtown skyline. When it was first built, it was the tallest building in the state. It remains one of the tallest city halls in the country, housing about 1,500 city government employees.

The building, which required 22 months to construct, is considered to have a neo-classic or beaux arts architecture, but is most notable for its art deco details and ornamentation. This is evident in a myriad of interior details, including sculpted brass elevator doors depicting the four major modes of transportation (planes, boats, cars and trains) that serve Kansas City; elaborate light fixtures in the lobby and elsewhere; and even custom brass doorknob plates. Outside, at the top floor of the six-story base, windows are replaced with a frieze of relief sculptures depicting the early settlement and growth of the Kansas City area.

City Hall also makes extensive use of imported Italian gray, red and white marble to line the hallways, and oak veneer paneling in the 26th-floor Council Chamber. The oak came from one giant tree grown in New York State. When City Hall was being built, there were no paneling presses big enough to make the veneer. So, the long strips of oak had to be worked and pressed by hand.

Besides its decor, the building is an engineering masterpiece. It has a steel frame encased in concrete and required 20,000 cubic feet of concrete, 7,800 tons of stone, 6,800 tons of steel and, as one newspaper put it, "a lake of paint." On a hot summer afternoon, the building is almost 3.25 inches taller than on a below-freezing winter day. But the building is designed so that this movement of the building's tremendous weight of 50,000 tons causes no harm. An elastic compound was used instead of cement mortar between the joints of one row of stone at every floor to act as an expansion joint.

The building was dedicated Oct. 25, 1937.

Taken at Ilus Davis Park looking south.











City Hall




City Hall





Kansas City, Missouri - Best viewed in original size

City Hall, located at 414 E. 12th St. in downtown Kansas City, Mo., was completed in 1937 at a cost of $5 million. It is the tallest and most obvious of three buildings in a construction program passed in 1931 by Kansas City voters. It was part of a "Ten-Year Plan" bond program offered to the public as a vision of stability, progress and faith in the future to counter the effects of the Depression. It also was tangible proof of the political effectiveness of Kansas City's Democratic machine, led by concrete company owner Tom "Boss" Pendergast.

Comprised of 29 stories plus a 30th-story observation deck, City Hall is the third tallest building in the city. It measures 443 feet from the sidewalk at the north door to the top of the building. Since it's on a hill, it dominates the downtown skyline. When it was first built, it was the tallest building in the state. It remains one of the tallest city halls in the country, housing about 1,500 city government employees.

The building, which required 22 months to construct, is considered to have a neo-classic or beaux arts architecture, but is most notable for its art deco details and ornamentation. This is evident in a myriad of interior details, including sculpted brass elevator doors depicting the four major modes of transportation (planes, boats, cars and trains) that serve Kansas City; elaborate light fixtures in the lobby and elsewhere; and even custom brass doorknob plates. Outside, at the top floor of the six-story base, windows are replaced with a frieze of relief sculptures depicting the early settlement and growth of the Kansas City area.

City Hall also makes extensive use of imported Italian gray, red and white marble to line the hallways, and oak veneer paneling in the 26th-floor Council Chamber. The oak came from one giant tree grown in New York State. When City Hall was being built, there were no paneling presses big enough to make the veneer. So, the long strips of oak had to be worked and pressed by hand.

Besides its decor, the building is an engineering masterpiece. It has a steel frame encased in concrete and required 20,000 cubic feet of concrete, 7,800 tons of stone, 6,800 tons of steel and, as one newspaper put it, "a lake of paint." On a hot summer afternoon, the building is almost 3.25 inches taller than on a below-freezing winter day. But the building is designed so that this movement of the building's tremendous weight of 50,000 tons causes no harm. An elastic compound was used instead of cement mortar between the joints of one row of stone at every floor to act as an expansion joint.

The building was dedicated Oct. 25, 1937.

Taken at Ilus Davis Park looking south.










concrete floor expansion joints








concrete floor expansion joints




Sponge Neoprene 2






This is a closed cell sponge neoprene. It is primarily used as a cushion and sealing tape against air and moisture. It can also be used as a dust seal for furniture, store fixtures and partitions, noise insulation, padding, expansion joints of precast concrete and steel, vapour barrier for prefab buildings, HVAC and refrigeration, automotive. It is also an excellent door seals for truck and bus bodies, offload equipment and transformer cabinets. More selections available, search for them on Amazon!










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