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ponedjeljak, 12.12.2011.

PARK LANE PARIS HOTEL : PARIS HOTEL


PARK LANE PARIS HOTEL : HOTEL MAYFAIR COPENHAGEN : FRANKFURT HOTELS.



Park Lane Paris Hotel





park lane paris hotel






    park lane
  • Park Lane Station is a DART Light Rail station located in north Dallas, Texas (USA) at Park Lane and Greenville Avenue, just east of Central Expressway. It opened in January 1997 and served as the northern terminus of the Red Line until 2002.

  • Park Lane is an investment banking firm headquartered in Los Angeles, California which provides sports finance advisory services to a wide variety of clients in the sports industry.

  • Park Lane is a shopping mall in Halifax. It is located on Spring Garden Road, and is owned by Crombie REIT.





    paris
  • the capital and largest city of France; and international center of culture and commerce

  • (Greek mythology) the prince of Troy who abducted Helen from her husband Menelaus and provoked the Trojan War

  • The capital of France, on the Seine River; pop. 2,175,000. Paris was held by the Romans, who called it Lutetia, and by the Franks, and was established as the capital in 987 under Hugh Capet. It was organized into three parts—the Ile de la Cite (an island in the Seine), the Right Bank, and the Left Bank—during the reign of Philippe-Auguste 1180–1223. The city's neoclassical architecture dates from the modernization of the Napoleonic era, which continued under Napoleon III, when the bridges and boulevards of the modern city were built

  • sometimes placed in subfamily Trilliaceae

  • A commercial city in northeastern Texas; pop. 24,699





    hotel
  • A code word representing the letter H, used in radio communication

  • a building where travelers can pay for lodging and meals and other services

  • In French contexts an hotel particulier is an urban "private house" of a grand sort. Whereas an ordinary maison was built as part of a row, sharing party walls with the houses on either side and directly fronting on a street, an hotel particulier was often free-standing, and by the eighteenth

  • A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis. The provision of basic accommodation, in times past, consisting only of a room with a bed, a cupboard, a small table and a washstand has largely been replaced by rooms with modern facilities, including en-suite

  • An establishment providing accommodations, meals, and other services for travelers and tourists











Pershing Square Viaduct (Park Avenue Viaduct)




Pershing Square Viaduct  (Park Avenue Viaduct)





Midtown Manhattan

Pershing Square Viaduct (Park Avenue Viaduct), Midtown Manhattan

Located at Park Avenue and 42nd Street, the Pershing Square Viaduct was constructed in 1917-1919. The viaduct extends from 40th Street to Grand Central Terminal at 42nd Street, linking upper and lower Park Avenue by way of elevated drives that make a circuit around the terminal building and descend to ground level at 4Sth Street.

Designed in 1912 by the architectural firm of Warren & Wetmore, the viaduct was conceived as part of the original 1903 plan for the station by the firm of Reed & Stem. It is an integral part of a complex circulation system that was planned for the ultimate convenience of both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. The terminal, the viaduct, and many of the surrounding buildings in the Grand Central zone comprise a carefully related scheme that is the finest example of Beaux-Arts civic planning in New York.

History of the Project

The completion of the Grand Central Terminal project in 1919 marked the culmination of 19th-century railroad development in New York City. The city's first rail line, the New York & Harlem Railroad Company, was incorporated in 1831, operating horse-drawn cars after the company's single locomotive had exploded. The first stretch of railway, which Extended from Prince Street to 14th Street along Fourth Avenue, was opened in 1832.

A cut through the rocky terrain of Murray Hill was soon completed, and by 1837 a steam locomotive serviced the line between 14th and 125th Streets. The Murray Hill cut was later taken over by the Metropolitan Street Railway for use by its trolleys, and was covered over and converted to a tunnel, known as the Belmont Tunnel. Today that tunnel, traveled by automobiles, connects with the Park Avenue Viaduct at 40th Street.

Railroad service rapidly expanded in New York. The New York afid New Haven Railroad opened in 1849, and by 1851 a third line, the Hudson River Railroad, ran trains to Albany. A fourth line, the New York Central Railroad, was established in 1853.

Mounting controversy accompanied the increased number of steam locomotives. The trains, which shared the street with other vehicles and pedestrians, were so dirty, noisy, and dangerous, that their use was banned south of 42nd Street by 1858.

By the early 1860s it was evident that complete restructuring of the city's railroad system was essential. The key figure in that process was Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt (1794-1877), who bought control of the New York & Harlem, the Hudson River, and New York Central Railroads between 1863 and 1867. Vanderbilt consolidated the three as the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad and planned a new terminal located between 42nd and 48th Streets and Madison and Lexington Avenues. The station called the Grand Central Depot, was designed by the architect John B. Snook and built in 1869-71.

At that time a new street, Vanderbilt Avenue, was constructed between 42nd and 48th Streets on the west side of the terminal. An enormous train shed and rail yard were located to the north of the station, with tracks running north at street level from 56th Street to 68th Street. From there the tracks passed through, an open cut as far as 96th Street, where they continued over an elevated masonry viaduct.

The tracks ran along Fourth Avenue where noise, steam, and flying sparks made conditions horrendous. A Fourth Avenue Improvement Scheme was established in 1872, resulting in the erection of pedestrian and vehicular bridges over the tracks, and the construction of a partially enclosed tunnel between 56th and 96th Streets. At that time, most of the squatters who occupied the area were forced out by building operations.

By 1898, the Depot no longer served the needs of the burgeoning railroad, and alterations were made in 1898 and 1900. However, the original problems — congestion, the interruption of cross-streets by the tracks, and poor ventilation — persisted. In 1902,a tragic train collision occurred in the Park Avenue tunnel, resulting in the death of seventeen people. The subsequent public outcry called for the immediate improvement of the rail system by electrification and submersion of the tracks. Plans for such modifications were initiated by the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad's chief engineer, Col. William J. Wilgus (1865-1914), and by Frank J. Sprague (1857-1934), a pioneer in the development of electric trains, then a new frontier of engineering. The country's first electric railway had appeared in Richmond, Virginia, and was installed by Sprague in 1887.

Both men worked on several plans for the remodeling of the existing depot, and a final scheme was accepted by William Newman,the President of the railroad, in 1903. The plan, which called for submerged, electrified tracks, a new terminal, and the use of air rights to develop adjacent real estate, was largely the work of Wilgus. Although he had little formal education, Wi











Pershing Square Viaduct (Park Avenue Viaduct)




Pershing Square Viaduct (Park Avenue Viaduct)





Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

Located at Park Avenue and 42nd Street, the Pershing Square Viaduct was constructed in 1917-1919. The viaduct extends from 40th Street to Grand Central Terminal at 42nd Street, linking upper and lower Park Avenue by way of elevated drives that make a circuit around the terminal building and descend to ground level at 4Sth Street.

Designed in 1912 by the architectural firm of Warren & Wetmore, the viaduct was conceived as part of the original 1903 plan for the station by the firm of Reed & Stem. It is an integral part of a complex circulation system that was planned for the ultimate convenience of both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. The terminal, the viaduct, and many of the surrounding buildings in the Grand Central zone comprise a carefully related scheme that is the finest example of Beaux-Arts civic planning in New York.

History of the Project

The completion of the Grand Central Terminal project in 1919 marked the culmination of 19th-century railroad development in New York City. The city's first rail line, the New York & Harlem Railroad Company, was incorporated in 1831, operating horse-drawn cars after the company's single locomotive had exploded. The first stretch of railway, which Extended from Prince Street to 14th Street along Fourth Avenue, was opened in 1832.

A cut through the rocky terrain of Murray Hill was soon completed, and by 1837 a steam locomotive serviced the line between 14th and 125th Streets. The Murray Hill cut was later taken over by the Metropolitan Street Railway for use by its trolleys, and was covered over and converted to a tunnel, known as the Belmont Tunnel. Today that tunnel, traveled by automobiles, connects with the Park Avenue Viaduct at 40th Street.

Railroad service rapidly expanded in New York. The New York afid New Haven Railroad opened in 1849, and by 1851 a third line, the Hudson River Railroad, ran trains to Albany. A fourth line, the New York Central Railroad, was established in 1853.

Mounting controversy accompanied the increased number of steam locomotives. The trains, which shared the street with other vehicles and pedestrians, were so dirty, noisy, and dangerous, that their use was banned south of 42nd Street by 1858.

By the early 1860s it was evident that complete restructuring of the city's railroad system was essential. The key figure in that process was Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt (1794-1877), who bought control of the New York & Harlem, the Hudson River, and New York Central Railroads between 1863 and 1867. Vanderbilt consolidated the three as the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad and planned a new terminal located between 42nd and 48th Streets and Madison and Lexington Avenues. The station called the Grand Central Depot, was designed by the architect John B. Snook and built in 1869-71.

At that time a new street, Vanderbilt Avenue, was constructed between 42nd and 48th Streets on the west side of the terminal. An enormous train shed and rail yard were located to the north of the station, with tracks running north at street level from 56th Street to 68th Street. From there the tracks passed through, an open cut as far as 96th Street, where they continued over an elevated masonry viaduct.

The tracks ran along Fourth Avenue where noise, steam, and flying sparks made conditions horrendous. A Fourth Avenue Improvement Scheme was established in 1872, resulting in the erection of pedestrian and vehicular bridges over the tracks, and the construction of a partially enclosed tunnel between 56th and 96th Streets. At that time, most of the squatters who occupied the area were forced out by building operations.

By 1898, the Depot no longer served the needs of the burgeoning railroad, and alterations were made in 1898 and 1900. However, the original problems — congestion, the interruption of cross-streets by the tracks, and poor ventilation — persisted. In 1902,a tragic train collision occurred in the Park Avenue tunnel, resulting in the death of seventeen people. The subsequent public outcry called for the immediate improvement of the rail system by electrification and submersion of the tracks. Plans for such modifications were initiated by the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad's chief engineer, Col. William J. Wilgus (1865-1914), and by Frank J. Sprague (1857-1934), a pioneer in the development of electric trains, then a new frontier of engineering. The country's first electric railway had appeared in Richmond, Virginia, and was installed by Sprague in 1887.

Both men worked on several plans for the remodeling of the existing depot, and a final scheme was accepted by William Newman,the President of the railroad, in 1903. The plan, which called for submerged, electrified tracks, a new terminal, and the use of air rights to develop adjacent real estate, was largely the work of Wilgus. Although he had little formal education, Wilgus had risen rapidly in









park lane paris hotel







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