ACCOMMODATION AT LORNE

ponedjeljak, 07.11.2011.

ACCOMMODATION AT LORNE. ACCOMMODATION AT


Accommodation at lorne. Hotel jianguo shanghai. North motel.



Accommodation At Lorne





accommodation at lorne






    accommodation
  • Lodging; room and board

  • A room, group of rooms, or building in which someone may live or stay

  • in the theories of Jean Piaget: the modification of internal representations in order to accommodate a changing knowledge of reality

  • a settlement of differences; "they reached an accommodation with Japan"

  • The available space for occupants in a building, vehicle, or vessel

  • adjustment: making or becoming suitable; adjusting to circumstances





    lorne
  • Lorne was an electoral district that existed in the District of Saskatchewan, Northwest Territories from 1880 until 1888. The district was one of the first three created by Royal Proclamation in 1880.

  • Krevlornswath "Lorne" of the Deathwok Clan, also known as The Host, is a fictional character created by Joss Whedon for the television series Angel. The character was portrayed by the late Andy Hallett.

  • Evan Lorne is a fictional character in the Canadian–American Sci-Fi Channel television series Stargate SG-1 and Stargate Atlantis, two military science fiction shows about military teams exploring the galaxy via a network of alien transportation devices.











Mountain Ash Sorbus (Pyrus) americana on Mount Royal




Mountain Ash Sorbus (Pyrus) americana on Mount Royal





This stunning Mountain Ash Sorbus (Pyrus) americana is on the corner of Dorchester Avenue and Carleton Street on Mount Royal Hill, one of the older neighbourhoods in Calgary with a unique history.

"In 1907, the CPR registered the area from Royal Avenue, and its western extension, Colborne Crescent, south to Dorchester Avenue, and from the eastern escarpment to 14th street on the west. [. . .] It was officially named Mount Royal, after the Montreal district where the CPR president, William Van Horne, lived. [. . .] Designed as an elite residential area, the lots were large, ranging in width from 50’ to 175’. Many of them were through lots extending the full depth of the block, anticipating the construction of large homes complete with both formal front entrances and rear service access. Lots on Sydenham Road extended right through to Prospect Avenue, as did those between Hope and 7th Streets, and Royal and Durham Avenues. The curvilinear roads followed the contours of the land, although the blocks between Prospect and Dorchester Avenues showed some relationship to a grid conformation, albeit with much more spacious lot sizes. The most desirable lots were on a slope and afforded the best views: northward they has a panoramic view of the city and the Bow River valley; and south and westward a view to the foothills and the Rocky Mountains. They were, of course, also on a distinct rise of land, above the dust and smoke of the city, an aspect that applies to many elite districts, Mount Royal in Montreal, for instances, and Shaughnessy in Vancouver(Courbet and Simpson 1994:17). By 1923 there were still 416 unsold lots in South Mount Royal, with an estimated value of close to $200,000.00, and the CPR still retained some at the end of World War II. All this vacant land led a group of enthusiasts to develop a golf course in 1919 on the land on the brow of the escarpment between 7th and 8th Streets. The course circled the school and hence called itself the Earl Grey Golf Club. [. . .] In the 1940s the pace of development picked up and by the 1950s and 1960s there were ever fewer vacant lots (Courbet and Simpson 1994:23). During its maturing process in the years between the wars, the community developed as an insular district sufficient unto itself. Vacant lots created an even more spacious and open feeling and many of the young people living in the area had their own horses, tethered for the most part on their own lots. There was no development to the south and they had the wide open prairie over which to ride (Courbet and Simpson 1994:23). "

The first house built on Mount Royal Hill was actually a sanatorium built by the enterprising Dr. Ernest Wills, an English doctor with a lot of experience in the treatment of tuberculosis who arrived in Calgary in 1903 (Courbet and Simpson 1994:13). It was built on the lot where this tree now grows, at the apex of Mount Royal Hill and the centre of Mount Royal. Because of its altitude and dry climate, Calgary had long been considered a good place for the treatment of tuberculosis. Dr. Wills could see the benefit of the hilltop location where there would be an ample supply of fresh air and open space for his patients. He owned a ten acre lot purchased from the Canadian Pacific Railway, S.W.1/4, Legal Subdivision 11, which included the square block now enclosed by Dorchester Avenue, Tenth Street West, Prospect Avenue and Carleton Street (Courbet and Simpson 1994:13). The building was, apparently, quite substantial. It had a drawing room, dining room, recreation and music room, as well as sleeping areas, and also accommodation for Dr. Wills and his family [. . .] Following the untimely death of Dr. Wells, the rectangular area was subdivided in a standard grid pattern. This anomaly is visible today with its straight streets and uniform sized lots. While the sanatorium building remained on site for some thirty years, it was eventually demolished and there are no visible signs of its existence (Courbet and Simpson 1994:29). [. . .] Wills' widow sold sold the ten acres in 1908 to "Richard L. Morrison, a physician who had taken over management of the sanatorium. Morrison had the area subdivided in February 1909 (see Map 3, Plan 304V) and the street that runs north and south down the middle of the area, now Morrison Street, was presumably named after him. The restrictive caveat placed on most houses in Mount Royal by the CPR was not on the title of houses in Plan 304 V (Courbet and Simpson 1994:14)."

This tree grows where Dorchester meets Carleton, both named by error after the same man. Sir Guy Carleton later received the title of Baron Dorchester according to a letter to the Editor from Donald B. Smith, Calgary Herald. September 30, 1990. See (Courbet and Simpson 1994).

";[T]he initial settlement in what is now Mount Royal took place around the lower slopes of Hope Street, then often known as 6th street, and along Royal Avenue, known as 20th avenue. And mos











Sheenagh and Eavanne




Sheenagh and Eavanne





Holiday park was nice, we were lucky. after some confusion over our accommodation on the saturday we checked in here at about 11 o clock at night, not far from Lorne.









accommodation at lorne







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ACCOMMODATION AT LORNE
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