Fashion industry salaries : Korean fashion 2011.



Fashion Industry Salaries





fashion industry salaries






    fashion industry
  • apparel industry: makers and sellers of fashionable clothing

  • Fashion, a general term for the style and custom prevalent at a given time, in its most common usage refers to costume or clothing style.

  • A conspiratorial organization that is hell bent on forcing women of size to wear frumpy clothing, and to promote anorexia by utilizing uber-skinny models.





    salaries
  • Pay a salary to

  • A salary is a form of periodic payment from an employer to an employee, which may be specified in an employment contract. It is contrasted with piece wages, where each job, hour or other unit is paid separately, rather than on a periodic basis.

  • (salary) a fixed amount of money paid to a worker, usually measured on a monthly or annual basis, not hourly, as wages. Implies a degree of professionalism and/or autonomy; To pay on the basis of a period of a week or longer, especially to convert from another form of compensation

  • (salary) wage: something that remunerates; "wages were paid by check"; "he wasted his pay on drink"; "they saved a quarter of all their earnings"











fashion industry salaries - How to




How to Survive (and Perhaps Thrive) on a Teacher's Salary


How to Survive (and Perhaps Thrive) on a Teacher's Salary



According to a 2006 study done by the National Education Association, 50% of teachers leave the profession within five years because of poor working conditions and low salaries. Yet, according to the 2006 General Social Survey, teaching ranks among the Top 10 most gratifying jobs with 69% of teachers reporting they were very satisfied with their jobs. A low salary should not be the reason stop molding young minds and influencing lives for the betterment of our society. Learn to:

Retire with a sizeable nest egg

Teach in a foreign country

Own all of your possessions including your cars and house

Invest in Roth IRAs and 403bs

Establish a weekly 'budget'

Live a financially secure life on a teacher s salary!

Use author Danny Kofke's easy-to-use tips to equip you and your family to not only survive, but live happily within your means, multiply your funds and invest in your future.

According to a 2006 study done by the National Education Association, 50% of teachers leave the profession within five years because of poor working conditions and low salaries. Yet, according to the 2006 General Social Survey, teaching ranks among the Top 10 most gratifying jobs with 69% of teachers reporting they were very satisfied with their jobs. A low salary should not be the reason stop molding young minds and influencing lives for the betterment of our society. Learn to:

Retire with a sizeable nest egg

Teach in a foreign country

Own all of your possessions including your cars and house

Invest in Roth IRAs and 403bs

Establish a weekly 'budget'

Live a financially secure life on a teacher s salary!

Use author Danny Kofke's easy-to-use tips to equip you and your family to not only survive, but live happily within your means, multiply your funds and invest in your future.










89% (16)





Richard Todd




Richard Todd





Richard Todd obituary

Actor best known for his role in the classic second world war film The Dam Busters

Richard Todd, who has died of cancer aged 90, will be best remembered for the films in which he played a wide assortment of clean-cut British heroes. His most famous performance was as Wing Commander Guy Gibson in The Dam Busters (1955), although he also played Robin Hood and Sir Walter Raleigh.

As dour and stiff upper-lipped as any of the characters he portrayed in his highly successful film career in the 1940s and 1950s, he was one of the first members of the Parachute Regiment to jump on D-day – a real-life role he later echoed, albeit at a higher rank, in The Longest Day (1962), the reconstruction of the invasion of Normandy 17 years after the event (another actor posed as Todd himself).

As Gibson, Todd starred as the leader of the daring airborne mission in May 1943 to smash German industry in the Ruhr valley by strategic bombing of its dams, causing massive flooding. The movie retold the story of Barnes Wallis's invention of a bouncing bomb that skimmed the surface of the reservoirs before colliding with the three targets – two of which were destroyed.

Born in Dublin, Todd was the son of an army major of Scots and Irish descent. His early life in England was one of private schools, including Shrewsbury, genteel poverty and family squabbles, usually over his father's drinking and extravagances that included buying a large Chrysler roadster behind his wife's back.

Through two divorces, Todd himself displayed a love of large cars, large houses and large domestic staffs, which only his earlier career as a film star – one of the busiest faces in British cinema – could comfortably support.

After the Italia Conti school of acting in London, where a teacher advised him to "bring it up from the genitals, dear!" – advice beyond his dramatic range – Todd first appeared with the Welsh Players, a precarious touring group, then with Dundee Rep. Just before the second world war, he appeared at the Regents Park open air theatre, then got a part in a mediocre film, For Them That Trespass (1949), and a seven-year contract with the Associated British Film Corporation (ABFC), then the main rival to Rank.

His tear-jerking portrayal of a dying and bitter Scots corporal in his second contract film, The Hasty Heart (1949), made him an instant hot property. Ronald Reagan was in a supporting role, his only appearance in a film made in Britain. The two men stayed in touch and once dined together at 10 Downing Street with a woman they both admired, Margaret Thatcher. Hitchcock used him in Stage Fright (1950), Walt Disney used him in Robin Hood (1952). But Todd was always uneasy in Hollywood. Once, in his enthusiasm for tennis and ignorance of local idiom, he told a startled Ruth Roman that he would love a knock up with her, and on another occasion he arrived for work in a car with a flat battery that his distinguished director King Vidor had to help push-start.

Todd nevertheless appeared as Raleigh, alongside Bette Davis, in The Virgin Queen in 1955, made The Sword and the Rose (1953) for Disney and Saint Joan (1957) for Otto Preminger. He certainly made ABFC more money than his salary by being hired out to other film-makers. But he was happiest while filming in England, although he refused the lead in The Guns of Navarone (1961) and was also unable to accept the role of James Bond – despite being Ian Fleming's first choice – because of other commitments. Sean Connery took the role instead.

By the end of the 1950s, the studio system was breaking up, his contract was not renewed, and wheeler-dealing over individual films became the norm. While flirting with television, for which he did Carrington VC in 1960, he became a stage actor-manager by forming Triumph theatre productions and touring middlebrow plays. Under the Triumph umbrella, he appeared in Royal Shakespeare Company productions, including The Hollow Crown. He also played the lead for eight unbroken years from 1981 in Richard Harris's The Business of Murder in the West End. His denigration of his own business sense and his squire's tweeds and eyeglass were partly a pose.

He became a dairy farmer from 1957, leading to his appointment as president of the Henley and District Agricultural Association in Buckinghamshire. A very British perfectionist, he confessed to a dream that, despite the warnings of his friends and everyone else he talked to, there would always be a market for the best. So he bought the very best Jersey cows, the best hens and the best pigs – and ran straight into trouble. Todd claimed that this came about because the Milk Marketing Board tended to help mediocre produce at the expense of the best. In those days most dairy farmers found it expedient to market their produce through the board, but he decided to go it alone.

"I saw to it that my Wensleydale cheese came from Wensleydale, my Gloucester from Gloucester," he said











Salaryman




Salaryman





According to researcher Ezra Vogel, the word "salaryman" saw widespread use in Japan by 1930, "although the white-collar class remained relatively small until the rapid expansion of government bureaucracies and war-related industry before and during World War II."[1]

The term does not include all workers who receive a set salary, but only to "white-collar workers in the large bureaucracy of a business firm or government office".[2] Workers in the mizu shobai and entertainment industries (including actors and singers) are not included even though their income may be salary based. Similarly, doctors, engineers, lawyers, accountants, musicians, artists, politicians, the self-employed, and corporate executives are also excluded.

A typical description of the salaryman is a white-collar desk worker in a suit and tie, who may or may not have a high grade of education. However, the term may also be used to give a highly negative connotation (see Social image). The word "businessman" is often used to avoid the negative image. A significant percentage of Japan's workers are salarymen. In sociology, the salaryman is known as Japan's new middle class, as opposed to the old middle class consisting of farmers and storeowners.

The media often portray the salaryman in negative fashion for lack of initiative and originality. Because of this portrayal, communities may be less willing to consult the salaryman for his emotional problems, which often leads to clinical depression or even suicide. Corporations are often more willing to fire salarymen to lower costs, and many Japanese students are attempting to veer off the typical path of graduating from college to enter a corporation and become a salaryman. The act of escaping from the corporate lifestyle is known as datsusara.

-Wikipedia-









fashion industry salaries








fashion industry salaries




Why Your Prescription Takes So Damn Long To Fill: A Foul-Mouthed, Liberal Pharmacist Breaks The Curse Of Christmas And Strikes Back Against The ... The Profession He Grudgingly Grew To Love






" .... I call your doctors office and am put on hold for 5 minutes, then informed that your was phoned in to my competitor on the other side of town. Phoning the competitor, I am immediately put on hold for 5 minutes before speaking to a clerk, who puts me back on hold to wait for the pharmacist. Your is then transferred to me, and now I have to get the 2 phone calls that have been put on hold while this was being done. Now I return to the counter to ask if we've ever filled s for you before. For some reason, you think that "for you" means "for your cousin" and you answer my question with a "yes", whereupon I go the computer and see you are not on file. The phone rings..."

That's part of the reason why your takes so long to fill, and after almost 20 years of this, a question I was never quite able to answer loomed larger and larger each day: "Why did I get into this profession?" Cranky customers whose only questions seem to involve their insurance co-pays. Pointless paperwork. People begging for early narcotic refills. Staff cuts. That was my workday. The strle to get people the medicine and information they needed seemed almost futile at times. Then one day I got the answer. It hit me like a ton of bricks while driving home one spring evening along the California coast. I was born again, but it had nothing to do with Jesus. It did have a lot to do with a little plastic motorcycle. And I did become the pharmacist who saved Christmas. I absolutely know now why I became a pharmacist.

I still don't know why your co-pay is so high.










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