3 DAY MINI BLINDS

21.10.2011., petak

METAL CAR CANOPY. CAR CANOPY


Metal car canopy. Remote shutter release canon 5d. Shade ceiling fixtures.



Metal Car Canopy





metal car canopy






    canopy
  • Cover or provide with a canopy

  • the umbrellalike part of a parachute that fills with air

  • cover with a canopy

  • the transparent covering of an aircraft cockpit





    metal
  • Gold and silver (as tinctures in blazoning)

  • Broken stone for use in making roads

  • A solid material that is typically hard, shiny, malleable, fusible, and ductile, with good electrical and thermal conductivity (e.g., iron, gold, silver, copper, and aluminum, and alloys such as brass and steel)

  • metallic element: any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.

  • cover with metal

  • metallic: containing or made of or resembling or characteristic of a metal; "a metallic compound"; "metallic luster"; "the strange metallic note of the meadow lark, sesting the clash of vibrant blades"- Ambrose Bierce





    car
  • a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"

  • a wheeled vehicle adapted to the rails of railroad; "three cars had jumped the rails"

  • the compartment that is suspended from an airship and that carries personnel and the cargo and the power plant

  • A railroad car of a specified kind

  • A road vehicle, typically with four wheels, powered by an internal combustion engine and able to carry a small number of people

  • A vehicle that runs on rails, esp. a railroad car











metal car canopy - DISNEY PIXAR




DISNEY PIXAR CARS TENT TODDLER BED


DISNEY PIXAR CARS TENT TODDLER BED



BB87072CR The Disney Cars Toddler Bed with Tent is perfect for transitioning your little speed racer from crib to big boy bed. The bed is built low to the ground for easy child access and comes with side rails for safe and secure sleeping. A cheerful Cars inspired design theme featuring your child's favorite Cars characters on the headboard and footboard making it a must have. Complements other Cars item sold separately online by Delta Children's Products. Features: -Constructed of high quality plastic and metal frame. -Sturdy steel frame provides strength and stability that will last. -Bright colors and cheerful Cars themed design. -Comes in a non-toxic finish. -Two removable safe sleep bedrails for safety. -Meets all JPMA safety requirements. -Uses a standard crib mattress (sold separately). -Recommended for 18 months to 5 years of age. -Weight limit up to 50 lbs. -Some assembly required.










88% (6)





A. T. Demarest & Company and Peerless Motor Car Company Buildings




A. T. Demarest & Company and Peerless Motor Car Company Buildings





Theater District, Midtown, Manhattan

Midtown Manhattan

The A.T. Demarest & Company and Peerless Motor Car Company Buildings, located in the heart of the "Automobile Row" section of Broadway in Manhattan, were used by the automobile industry for over six decades. They were constructed in 1909 to the designs of eminent architect Francis H. Kimball, in collaboration with consulting engineer Purdy & Henderson and George A. Fuller Co., builders. Kimball had emerged in the forefront of early skyscraper design in New York City, particularly during his collaboration with G. Kramer Thompson in 1892-98. A.T. Demarest & Co., started in 1860 by Aaron T. Demarest, was a carriage manufacturer that also ventured into the production of automobile bodies around 1902. The Peerless Motor Car Co. of New York was a branch of the Cleveland luxury automobile manufacturing firm. Though architecturally harmonious, the two buildings were constructed separately for these firms - the Peerless building was L-shaped in plan and wrapped around the corner Demarest building - and have subtly different ornamental schemes. Incorporating neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque stylistic references, they were designed to relate to the mammoth neo-Gothic style Broadway Tabernacle then located next door to the south. Kimball employed the technology of contemporary skyscrapers for these buildings. Nine stories in height (plus a partial tenth story and two-storv tower on the Peerless building), they are of steel-frame curtain wall construction above concrete piers and are almost entirely clad on the principal facades in white matt glazed terra cotta (now painted) manufactured by the New York Architectural Terra Cotta Co., the only major architectural terra cotta firm in New York City. This represents an early and significant use of terra-cotta cladding for tall buildings in New York. These buildings had ground-story automobile and carriage showrooms (among the earliest surviving in New York), with repair shops and warerooms above. Both structures were acquired in 1918 and combined into one office building by the recently-formed General Motors Corporation for its initial major corporate headquarters. The building was used by General Motors for over fifty years, until its purchase in 1977 by the Hearst Corporation to house offices of its Hearst Magazines division.

The A.T. Demarest & Company and Peerless Motor Car Company Buildings, located at the southeast comer of Broadway and West 57th Street, were constructed in 1909 as separate structures, though architecturally harmonious incorporating neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque stylistic references. They were combined internally as an office building for the General Motors Corp. in 1917-19. Nine stories in height (plus a partial tenth stoiy and a two-story tower on the east side), the building is of steel-frame curtain wall construction above concrete piers. It is almost entirely clad in white matt glazed terra cotta (now painted) on the two principal (northern and western)
facades and a (now) partially visible southern facade. The Broadway and 57th Street facades are each articulated horizontally with a two-story base (originally for showrooms), and vertically with five three-bay sections that join in a canted two-bay comer. The building also has a visible, partially articulated eastern facade. The building originally had one-over-one double-hung wood sash windows; some of the original windows survive, while others have been replaced with anodized aluminum. The building formerly carried a large metal framework with automobile advertising signs on the roof and a large vertical neon sign on the Broadway facade. Base (ground and second stories) The five wide bays of each principal facade are framed with two-story pilasters capped by shield cartouches. The original arrangement of most of the ground-story bays was a tripartite storefront window above a bulkhead (several bays had pedestrian or automobile entrances), surmounted by a tripartite transom and terra-cotta spandrel. The ground-story bulkhead is currently clad with a non-historic granite veneer. The current non-historic single-pane storefront windows are surmounted by non-historic metal spandrels and commercial signage (c. late 1970s). Each bay of the second story originally consisted of a central window flanked by metal mullions and one-over-one windows, above and below painted and riveted steel beams. 57lh Street facade: The easternmost ground-story section has five metal and glass entrance doors with a five-pane transom, flanked by bronze plaques with the inscription "Argonaut Building 224 West 57th St". A decorative metal canopy, held by cables anchored to a metal spandrel panel, is located above this. The second section from the east has a non-historic door, vehicle doorway, metal panel and louvers. Corner: The comer entrance originally had two doors with glass panels, a fanlight, and a decorative spandrel panel. There











The A.T. Demarest & Company and Peerless Motor Car Company Building




The A.T. Demarest & Company and Peerless Motor Car Company Building





Midtown Manhattan

The A.T. Demarest & Company and Peerless Motor Car Company Buildings, located in the heart of the "Automobile Row" section of Broadway in Manhattan, were used by the automobile industry for over six decades. They were constructed in 1909 to the designs of eminent architect Francis H. Kimball, in collaboration with consulting engineer Purdy & Henderson and George A. Fuller Co., builders. Kimball had emerged in the forefront of early skyscraper design in New York City, particularly during his collaboration with G. Kramer Thompson in 1892-98. A.T. Demarest & Co., started in 1860 by Aaron T. Demarest, was a carriage manufacturer that also ventured into the production of automobile bodies around 1902. The Peerless Motor Car Co. of New York was a branch of the Cleveland luxury automobile manufacturing firm. Though architecturally harmonious, the two buildings were constructed separately for these firms - the Peerless building was L-shaped in plan and wrapped around the corner Demarest building - and have subtly different ornamental schemes. Incorporating neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque stylistic references, they were designed to relate to the mammoth neo-Gothic style Broadway Tabernacle then located next door to the south. Kimball employed the technology of contemporary skyscrapers for these buildings. Nine stories in height (plus a partial tenth story and two-storv tower on the Peerless building), they are of steel-frame curtain wall construction above concrete piers and are almost entirely clad on the principal facades in white matt glazed terra cotta (now painted) manufactured by the New York Architectural Terra Cotta Co., the only major architectural terra cotta firm in New York City. This represents an early and significant use of terra-cotta cladding for tall buildings in New York. These buildings had ground-story automobile and carriage showrooms (among the earliest surviving in New York), with repair shops and warerooms above. Both structures were acquired in 1918 and combined into one office building by the recently-formed General Motors Corporation for its initial major corporate headquarters. The building was used by General Motors for over fifty years, until its purchase in 1977 by the Hearst Corporation to house offices of its Hearst Magazines division.

The A.T. Demarest & Company and Peerless Motor Car Company Buildings, located at the southeast comer of Broadway and West 57th Street, were constructed in 1909 as separate structures, though architecturally harmonious incorporating neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque stylistic references. They were combined internally as an office building for the General Motors Corp. in 1917-19. Nine stories in height (plus a partial tenth stoiy and a two-story tower on the east side), the building is of steel-frame curtain wall construction above concrete piers. It is almost entirely clad in white matt glazed terra cotta (now painted) on the two principal (northern and western)
facades and a (now) partially visible southern facade. The Broadway and 57th Street facades are each articulated horizontally with a two-story base (originally for showrooms), and vertically with five three-bay sections that join in a canted two-bay comer. The building also has a visible, partially articulated eastern facade. The building originally had one-over-one double-hung wood sash windows; some of the original windows survive, while others have been replaced with anodized aluminum. The building formerly carried a large metal framework with automobile advertising signs on the roof and a large vertical neon sign on the Broadway facade. Base (ground and second stories) The five wide bays of each principal facade are framed with two-story pilasters capped by shield cartouches. The original arrangement of most of the ground-story bays was a tripartite storefront window above a bulkhead (several bays had pedestrian or automobile entrances), surmounted by a tripartite transom and terra-cotta spandrel. The ground-story bulkhead is currently clad with a non-historic granite veneer. The current non-historic single-pane storefront windows are surmounted by non-historic metal spandrels and commercial signage (c. late 1970s). Each bay of the second story originally consisted of a central window flanked by metal mullions and one-over-one windows, above and below painted and riveted steel beams. 57lh Street facade: The easternmost ground-story section has five metal and glass entrance doors with a five-pane transom, flanked by bronze plaques with the inscription "Argonaut Building 224 West 57th St". A decorative metal canopy, held by cables anchored to a metal spandrel panel, is located above this. The second section from the east has a non-historic door, vehicle doorway, metal panel and louvers. Corner: The comer entrance originally had two doors with glass panels, a fanlight, and a decorative spandrel panel. There are currently non-historic aluminum a









metal car canopy







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3 DAY MINI BLINDS

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