2011 INVESTMENT BANKING ASSOCIATE BONUSES

subota, 05.11.2011.

CHINESE OIL INVESTMENT : CHINESE OIL


CHINESE OIL INVESTMENT : INVESTMENT PROPERTIES OF AMERICA



Chinese Oil Investment





chinese oil investment






    investment
  • The action or process of investing money for profit or material result

  • An act of devoting time, effort, or energy to a particular undertaking with the expectation of a worthwhile result

  • outer layer or covering of an organ or part or organism

  • investing: the act of investing; laying out money or capital in an enterprise with the expectation of profit

  • the commitment of something other than money (time, energy, or effort) to a project with the expectation of some worthwhile result; "this job calls for the investment of some hard thinking"; "he made an emotional investment in the work"

  • A thing that is worth buying because it may be profitable or useful in the future





    chinese
  • Belonging to or relating to the people forming the dominant ethnic group of China and widely dispersed elsewhere

  • Of or relating to China or its language, culture, or people

  • any of the Sino-Tibetan languages spoken in China; regarded as dialects of a single language (even though they are mutually unintelligible) because they share an ideographic writing system

  • Taiwanese: of or relating to or characteristic of the island republic on Taiwan or its residents or their language; "the Taiwanese capital is Taipeh"

  • of or pertaining to China or its peoples or cultures; "Chinese food"





    oil
  • Petroleum

  • Any of various thick, viscous, typically flammable liquids that are insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents and are obtained from animals or plants

  • cover with oil, as if by rubbing; "oil the wooden surface"

  • A viscous liquid derived from petroleum, esp. for use as a fuel or lubricant

  • a slippery or viscous liquid or liquefiable substance not miscible with water

  • anoint: administer an oil or ointment to ; often in a religious ceremony of blessing











Ladd-Gilman House (1721) & Folsom Tavern (1775) (pano)




Ladd-Gilman House (1721) & Folsom Tavern (1775) (pano)





Built 1721 as one of NH's earliest brick houses, and enlarged and clapboarded in the 1750's, this dwelling served as the state treasury during the Revolution. Here were born John Taylor Gilman (1753-1828). Who was elected Governor for an unequalled total of 14 years, and his brother Nocholas Gilman, Jr. (1755-1814), a signer of the U.S. Constitution. The house has been maintained since 1902 by the Society of the Cincinnati.

In October 2004, the Folsom Tavern (right side of photo) was moved to its current location on Water St. in downtown Exeter. Restoration of the building has included installing a new roof and clapboards and removing a 1950's-era kitchen and bathroom.

Interior restoration began in January 2006. On May 8, 2006, the museum received $100,000 from New Hampshire's Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP) to complete interior restoration of the tavern. The project was completed in Spring 2007.

The Folsom Tavern was built c. 1775 by Colonel Samuel Folsom, brother of General Nathaniel Folsom. The tavern stood facing the square, located on the corner of Court and Mill streets (now Front and Water streets).

--------------------------------------------- -----------------------------------

George Washington’s Visit
Revolutionary officers met at the Folsom Tavern on Tuesday, November 18, 1783, and formed the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Hampshire. President George Washington stopped by the tavern on the morning of November 4, 1789 to ‘partake of a collation’ during his tour of New England.

Widow Folsom’s Inn
After Samuel Folsom’s death in 1790, one-third of his estate with half-part of the ‘mansion’ was bequeathed to his wife Elizabeth, and the remaining two-thirds of his estate went to his three daughters. Elizabeth continued to run the tavern until her death in 1805 as “Widow Folsom’s Inn.” The historic structure stayed in the family until 1856 when it was sold to George Washington Dearborn, a retired drist who kept a “curiosity” antiques shop in the building.

A Tavern Transformed
In May 1869, approval for the widening of Water Street was granted to alleviate the traffic congestion in the center of town, and the tavern was set back closer to Sleeper’s jewelry store. During the first move, the original chimneys were removed and the building was put on a high foundation that allowed for shops beneath.

Upon Dearborn’s death in 1896, he bequeathed his ‘corner estate’ to Elizabeth Ewer, an unmarried local woman who was known as “Miss Lizzie Ewer, Inspirational Lecturer and Test Medium,” a mystic and landscape painter.

Folsom Tavern on its original foundation,
c. 1860
Folsom Tavern, c. 1910
Folsom Tavern, c. 1930
Exeter bandstand with tavern to right, c. 1917
The Museum uses the Tavern mostly for special events and programs.

The Exeter, Hampton and Amesbury Street Railway began in 1897 and the lower floor of the tavern became the passenger station waiting room. The upper floors of the building held apartments and offices, including the headquarters for the Exeter and Hampton Electric Co. In the basement at various times were a shoe repair shop, a Chinese laundry, a millinery shop operated by Nellie Rollins, and the passenger waiting station. Oliver R. Yeaton and his wife, Augusta Cenith Beardslee ran the streetcar waiting station and opened their restaurant, later called “Washington’s Lunch,” in the waiting room around 1907.

Building Lot to Gas Station
The tavern was purchased from Elizabeth Ewer on November 4, 1909, by John Scammon. Twenty years later, Scammon sold the Folsom site to the Standard Oil Co. and “with a fine appreciation of the niceties” gave the building to the Society of the Cincinnati.

The Tavern’s New Home
Society members raised the funds needed to move the tavern to its third foundation at 21 Spring Street. The old tavern site became a Standard Oil filling station. The Folsom Tavern remained empty until 1947 when Foster and Martha G. Stearns moved into the tavern after a major renovation and modernization by Boston architects Downer & Root. The kitchen of the Folsom Tavern was in an ell and this was not moved when the tavern was brought from its original location. After Foster Stearns died in 1956, Martha moved to a suite in the Exeter Inn, and the tavern subsequently housed four more tenants off and on until 1992.

(Middle background, a glimpse of Phillips Exeter Academy)












Folsom Tavern (1775)




Folsom Tavern (1775)





In October 2004, the Folsom Tavern was moved to its current location on Water St. in downtown Exeter. Restoration of the building has included installing a new roof and clapboards and removing a 1950's-era kitchen and bathroom.

Interior restoration began in January 2006. On May 8, 2006, the museum received $100,000 from New Hampshire's Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP) to complete interior restoration of the tavern. The project was completed in Spring 2007.

The Folsom Tavern was built c. 1775 by Colonel Samuel Folsom, brother of General Nathaniel Folsom. The tavern stood facing the square, located on the corner of Court and Mill streets (now Front and Water streets).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

George Washington’s Visit
Revolutionary officers met at the Folsom Tavern on Tuesday, November 18, 1783, and formed the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Hampshire. President George Washington stopped by the tavern on the morning of November 4, 1789 to ‘partake of a collation’ during his tour of New England.

Widow Folsom’s Inn
After Samuel Folsom’s death in 1790, one-third of his estate with half-part of the ‘mansion’ was bequeathed to his wife Elizabeth, and the remaining two-thirds of his estate went to his three daughters. Elizabeth continued to run the tavern until her death in 1805 as “Widow Folsom’s Inn.” The historic structure stayed in the family until 1856 when it was sold to George Washington Dearborn, a retired drist who kept a “curiosity” antiques shop in the building.


A Tavern Transformed
In May 1869, approval for the widening of Water Street was granted to alleviate the traffic congestion in the center of town, and the tavern was set back closer to Sleeper’s jewelry store. During the first move, the original chimneys were removed and the building was put on a high foundation that allowed for shops beneath.

Upon Dearborn’s death in 1896, he bequeathed his ‘corner estate’ to Elizabeth Ewer, an unmarried local woman who was known as “Miss Lizzie Ewer, Inspirational Lecturer and Test Medium,” a mystic and landscape painter.

Folsom Tavern on its original foundation,
c. 1860
Folsom Tavern, c. 1910
Folsom Tavern, c. 1930
Exeter bandstand with tavern to right, c. 1917
The Museum uses the Tavern mostly for special events and programs.

The Exeter, Hampton and Amesbury Street Railway began in 1897 and the lower floor of the tavern became the passenger station waiting room. The upper floors of the building held apartments and offices, including the headquarters for the Exeter and Hampton Electric Co. In the basement at various times were a shoe repair shop, a Chinese laundry, a millinery shop operated by Nellie Rollins, and the passenger waiting station. Oliver R. Yeaton and his wife, Augusta Cenith Beardslee ran the streetcar waiting station and opened their restaurant, later called “Washington’s Lunch,” in the waiting room around 1907.

Building Lot to Gas Station
The tavern was purchased from Elizabeth Ewer on November 4, 1909, by John Scammon. Twenty years later, Scammon sold the Folsom site to the Standard Oil Co. and “with a fine appreciation of the niceties” gave the building to the Society of the Cincinnati.

The Tavern’s New Home
Society members raised the funds needed to move the tavern to its third foundation at 21 Spring Street. The old tavern site became a Standard Oil filling station. The Folsom Tavern remained empty until 1947 when Foster and Martha G. Stearns moved into the tavern after a major renovation and modernization by Boston architects Downer & Root. The kitchen of the Folsom Tavern was in an ell and this was not moved when the tavern was brought from its original location. After Foster Stearns died in 1956, Martha moved to a suite in the Exeter Inn, and the tavern subsequently housed four more tenants off and on until 1992.











chinese oil investment







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2011 INVESTMENT BANKING ASSOCIATE BONUSES

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