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2011

FLIGHTS LONDON TO MUMBAI. TO MUMBAI


Flights London To Mumbai. Student Flights To New York.



Flights London To Mumbai





flights london to mumbai






    flights
  • Shoot (wildfowl) in flight

  • (in soccer, cricket, etc.) Deliver (a ball) with well-judged trajectory and pace

  • (flight) shoot a bird in flight

  • (flight) an instance of traveling by air; "flying was still an exciting adventure for him"

  • (flight) fly in a flock; "flighting wild geese"





    london
  • The capital of the United Kingdom, in southeastern England on the Thames River; pop. 6,377,000. London, called Londinium, was settled as a river port and trading center shortly after the Roman invasion of ad 43 and has been a flourishing center since the Middle Ages.It is divided administratively into the City of London, which is the country's financial center, and 32 boroughs

  • the capital and largest city of England; located on the Thames in southeastern England; financial and industrial and cultural center

  • An industrial city in southeastern Ontario, Canada, north of Lake Erie; pop. 303,165

  • United States writer of novels based on experiences in the Klondike gold rush (1876-1916)

  • London is the capital of England and the United Kingdom. It is the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures.





    mumbai
  • a city in western India just off the coast of the Arabian Sea; India's 2nd largest city (after Calcutta); has the only natural deep-water harbor in western India

  • Mumbai is a upcoming Bollywood Terrorist movie directed and produced by Deepak S. Shivdasani. The film stars Shahid Kapoor, Arjun Rampal and Kareena Kapoor in the film. It also stars Celina Jaitley. The film is being filmed so it will be released in late 2010.

  • A city and port on the western coast of India, capital of the state of Maharashtra; pop. 9,990,000

  • Mumbai (; ?????, ', ), also known as Bombay''' , is the capital of the Indian state of Maharashtra. It is the most populous city in India, and the most populous city in the world, with a population of approximately 14 million.











London WS 11-15-2007-035




London WS 11-15-2007-035





Selfridges Department Store, Oxford Street, London

Selfridges is a chain of department stores in the United Kingdom. It was founded by American entrepreneur Harry Gordon Selfridge. The flagship store in London's Oxford Street is the second largest shop in the UK (after Harrods) and was opened on 15 March 1909. [1]

H. Gordon Selfridge was born in 1858 in Ripon, Wisconsin, and in 1879 joined Field, Leiter and Company (later to become Marshall Field & Company), where he worked under the Chicago retailer of the same name. He worked his way up through the firm, married into the prominent Buckingham family, and amassed the fortune with which he built his new London store.

Selfridge's innovative marketing led to his success. He tried to make shopping a fun adventure instead of a chore. He put merchandise on display so customers could examine it, put the highly profitable perfume counter front-and-centre on the ground floor, and established policies that made it safe and easy for customers to shop — techniques that have been adopted by modern department stores the world over.

Either Selfridge or Marshall Field is popularly held to have coined the phrase "the customer is always right",[2] and he did use it regularly in his extensive advertising. The phrase, however, predated Selfridge by centuries; he may have assimilated it while purchasing Persian rugs in Mumbai.[citation needed]

He attracted shoppers with educational and scientific exhibits. He was himself interested in education and science, and believed that the displays would introduce potential new customers to Selfridges, generating both immediate and long-term sales.

In 1909, after the first cross-Channel flight, Louis Bleriot's monoplane was exhibited at Selfridges, where it was seen by 12,000 people. The first public demonstration of television was by John Logie Baird from the first floor of Selfridges from 1-27 April 1925.


Oxford Street store in London.A Milne-Shaw seismograph was set up on the Selfridge store’s third floor in 1932, attached to one of the building's main stanchions, unaffected by traffic or shoppers. It recorded the Belgian earthquake of 11 June 1938 which was also felt in London. At the outbreak of war, the seismograph was moved from its original site near the Post Office to another part of the store. In 1947, the seismograph was given to the British Museum.

The provincial stores were sold to the John Lewis Partnership in the 1940s. The remaining Oxford Street store was acquired in 1951 by the Liverpool-based Lewis's chain of department stores, which was in turn taken over in 1965 by the Sears group of Charles Clore.[3] Between 1998 and 2003, the store supplemented its 540,000-square-foot (50,000 m?) main store with a 150,000-square-foot (14,000 m?) store at Trafford Centre in Manchester, a 125,000-square-foot (11,600 m?) store in Exchange Square, also in Manchester, and a 200,000-square-foot (20,000 m?) store in the Birmingham Bull Ring shopping complex. In March 1998 Selfridges had acquired a new logo at use to the present which came in tandem with the opening of the Trafford Centre outlet and Selfridges demerger from Sears.


Selfridges in Birmingham.Selfridge stores are known for architectural excellence. Their main store was designed by Daniel Burnham, who also crafted Marshall Field's main store in his home town of Chicago. The London store was built in phases, the first phase consisting only of the nine-and-a-half bays closest to the Duke Street corner.[4] A scheme to erect a massive tower above the store was never carried out.[5] Also involved in the design of the store were the American architect Francis Swales, who worked on decorative details, and the British architect Frank Atkinson.[6] The 160,000-square-foot (15,000 m?) Birmingham store, designed by architects Future Systems, is covered in 15,000 spun aluminium discs. The store is highly distinctive for its yellow carrier bags.

In 2003, the chain was acquired by Canada's Galen Weston for ?598 million. Weston, a retailing expert who is the owner of Canada's major supermarket chains Loblaws and No Frills among others, has chosen to invest in renovation of the Oxford Street store, rather than to carry out planned expansion to Leeds, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Bristol, and Glasgow which appears to have been abandoned due to plans for stores at the locations having been suspended since 2003 and the planned construction of the Glasgow store having not commenced as of 2007 even though Selfridges own a site in the city.[7] The Chief Executive is Irish retailer, Paul Kelly. Kelly has worked for the Weston organisation since the mid-eighties

Photo taken by E. Kotun, November 1950.












Last photo




Last photo





my very last photo from Super Adventure Times in India.

I kinda lost the will after this point.

about 5 hrs in and only one more day to Glasgow I was getting figgety.

This the same meal from before, same flight.

Got to London totally outta whack, saw Hot Fuzz in the only DigiPlex in the UK. Got sick of English accents and longed to be home with agressive Weigies. and aggressive kt!

the flight from London to Prestwick felt longer than it ever shoulda. The Train from Prestwick to Glasgow was like a never moving queue of death. Fidggyitis was gripping my soul and twisting!

then i got home and it was all good! yay!

4 days of planes trains and automobiles and I hadn't killed almost anyone. i rock.









flights london to mumbai







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